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Electric furnace/heater pump/fan unit won't shut off

Even after preset temp is reached, with thermostat set to "emergency/aux heat", electric furnace/heater pump/fan unit won't shut off unless manually shut. The unit is less than 5 year old and is a TRANE.

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There are dip switches on the main board.. When you remove the lower panel on the air handler there are instructions to where the dip switches should be for your units fan control. if the switches are in the correct configuration.. The Thermostat may be malfunctioning or not wired properly. and last.. and most expensive.. the motherboard may also be failing.

Posted on Jan 12, 2009

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Hey, I purchased your Honeywell RTH2510 Thermostat, but I didn't even think to label the wires when I took the old thermostat off. Upon installation of the new Thermostat (2510) the Air Conditioning...


The connections that you really need to reference would be at the air handler itself. That would tell you which wires go outside to the heat pump and which wires go to the air handler. I can however give you some basics that may help.

Heat Pump Wiring
Terminals/Colors/Function
R- Red- 24v power supply. (Usually a jumper between RC/RH)
G- Green- Fan
W- White- Heat (Sometimes W1-W2, first or second stage heat)
Y- Yellow- Cooling (Same applies as above i.e. Y1-Y2)
C- Common (Most people use blue unless it is used for B terminal and sometimes cooling on older 4 wire systems.
B/O- Reversing Valve for heat pump. Either powered heating or powered cooling, depending on system installed.
Aux- Also used for heat.

Note: Considering that the installer had their own way to run all wires, use different wires, connections, etc. This is just a reference to common wiring in the field.

How the most common system is hooked up:
Thermostat:
Red wire goes to R terminal
Yellow wire goes to Y1 or Y2 terminal
Green wire goes to G terminal
White wire usually goes to W1 or W2 terminal
Orange or Black wire goes to B/O terminal
Brown wire usually goes to Aux terminal
Blue wire goes to C terminal, unless its being used as stated above.

This is without using a fossil fuel kit or zone control board.

Where do they go from the thermostat?
Red
goes to the air handler transformer or board and goes outside to heat pump to power low voltage controls.
Yellow wire goes straight outside to Y terminals on heat pump unless going to a board inside first.
Green goes to the air handler fan relay.
Common goes to the air handler and outside to heat pump.
Black or Orange will go outside to heat pump terminals for reversing valve.
White usually goes outside to heat pump,and inside to air handler. Will explain reason further down.
Brown will go to the air handler to the heat relay for the emergency heat.

On a call for heat, with a powered cooling system (more common).
The R, Y, and G terminals energize, sending a signal to start the blower and pull in the contactor outside. Note that the Y terminal is usually cooling, but since this is a powered cooling system, the reversing valve is not energized, causing the system to run in heat mode. If you have powered heating, the reversing valve terminal will energize also. Depending on thermostat, if you set the temp substantially higher than room temp, it may kick on the emergency/aux heat to quickly raise the room temp. On a call for emergency/aux heat, the R, G, and E/Aux terminals are energized, turning on the electric/gas heat instead of the heat pump. This comes in handy since the heat pump can only pull so much heat from outside before its not enough to properly warm the house, usually around 30 degrees outside temp. If you are running the heat pump and the system goes into "defrost", the outside unit will send a signal back to the air handler, through the white wire I mentioned earlier, to tell the emergency/aux heat to come on while it is in defrost mode, providing heat whenever needed.

Again, this is just a reference guide to some basic wiring, but hopefully it will tell you where the problem is or at the least, give you a good start. There are variables in which things can change the wiring like a zoning system or fossil fuel kit. Even then, you should be able to get pretty close. Hope this helps and Happy Holidays!

Dec 07, 2013 | Honeywell Programmable Thermostat Heater

1 Answer

I JUST BOUGHT THIS UNIT IT HAS THE OUTSIDE UNIT AND THE INSIDE UNIT AND I WAS TOLD THAT THE HEAT PACKS IN THE INSIDE HANDLER IS FOR EMERGENCY HEAT ONLY...IS THIS TRUE?


Yes, if you are talking about a heat pump. It you have an electric furnace inside, the electric elements are for emergency heat. Otherwise, unless you switch it manually at the thermostat, the heatpump (outdoor unit) will run all year around. If you want to use your inside heater (electric heater) just switch your thermostat to "emergency heat" and it will turn on the electrical elements instead of the outdoor unit. This way will make your elec. bill higher tho. The heat pump is much more efficient. Hope this helps you , have good day

Jul 21, 2011 | Goodman Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

With my thermostat on auto and on heat, and the furnace turns on, the fan will not turn on with it. If I switch the fan to on it will run after I repeat back and forth from auto to fan on several times...


Well, here is the deal: unless you rewired from two wire to multiple (usually 4 to 10 wires) wires, the fan cannot be controlled from the thermostat, even though the thermostat indicates that it can > it is a physical wiring and fan administration issue.

Unless you have a newer furnace, the fan is controlled by plenum temp. Works like this: burner turns on, no fan until the plenum temp reaches set temp,....then burner off, and fan keeps running until pelnum temp drops, and often the fan may kick on a few more times as this temp depletes.

Oct 03, 2010 | Honeywell Electronic Programmable...

1 Answer

Rheem RHQA Heater:Blower works but no heat.


Is there a setting on the thermostat for Auto or Fan? If so, make sure it is in the Auto setting. You will have a contactor that turns on the elements and a relay for the fan. Follow the wiring diagram to see which relay energizes the fan then unplug it to see if the fan stops.

Nov 02, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

My heater will kick on right away but after 3-5mins it stops producing heat then a few mins later it will start heating again. Why?


The furnace could be shutting off on High Limit ...means your furnace is running too hot...check your filter and make sure return air vents are clean and clear....also it can be the Heat anticipator in your thermostat...which controls how many times your furnace cycles...basically your furnace should come on and off 5-6 times/hr ....need more info on your type of furnace and type of thermostat

Oct 19, 2009 | Holmes Products HCH4062 Ceramic Compact...

5 Answers

What's the difference between EM HEAT and AUX HEAT?


Sorry, neither of these answers are completely correct.
You have a heat pump (or the wrong thermostat). Let's assume you have a heat pump.

In air conditioning mode, it works like every air conditioner you have ever had, but...

In heat mode, it reverses its operation. Have you ever felt the air coming out of the outdoor unit of your A/C unit? It's hot, isn't it. And the air coming out of the indoor unit (out of the registers) is cold. Now for a heat pump to produce heat it simply runs the air conditioner in reverse and the heat comes out in the house and the cold is released outside. Neat, huh!

Here's the problem with heat pumps...when it is really cold outside the heat pump can't produce enough heat to heat your home. So it has an additional heat source called "Auxiliary Heat". This heat comes on automatically when the house doesn't get warm enough. The source of this heat is based on the region of the country you are in. North/Northeast generally have oil heat, other regions have gas, and still others have to use electricity to heat. In Texas, we usually use electricity as the supplementary heat on heat pumps. VERY EXPENSIVE!

Now the "Emergency Heat"...this is exactly as stated in Solution #2. This is manually turned on by YOU at the thermostat when your heat pump fails. This turns on the auxilliary heaters and turns off the heat pump (remember, the reverse air conditioner). Again, this can be quite expensive to run if your heat source uses electricity! Gas and oil may be cheaper. The emergency heat is only designed (normally) to keep the house livable (not comfortable) until the Heating Tech can get out to you and fix your heat pump.

Something else you should know. It is normal for a heat pump's outdoor coil to frost up during heating mode. It will detect this and go into DEFROST mode and melt the frost off the coil. While it is doing this, it will turn on the auxilliary heater to keep the air blowing in the house at a reasonable "warm" temperature, but it will not be as hot as normal. In fact, heat pumps produce a lower temperature heat than traditional heaters. So the air may feel cooler during heating than you are use to anyway. This is normal and is not a sign of a problem.

So what do you do: Set your thermostat to the temperature you want and set the controls for HEAT/COOL and FAN-AUTO/ON and leave the EMERG HEAT off unless your heat pump breaks.

As always, keep your filters clean and your outdoor unit's coils clean and free of debris.

Hope this explains your question for you!

Oct 16, 2009 | Ruud Central System Air Conditioner

2 Answers

My air handler comes on ,not the outside unit when my thermostat is in the off position even if i turn the thermostat down to 50 and have it turned off the air handler comes on for about 5 to 10 minutes...


If you have a standard thermostat the fan switch is for the air handler only. It completely over rides the thermostat for most settings. Now lets see this is what I'd expect:
fan switch on Indoor fan runs all time
Fan switch auto Indoor fan only runs when thermostat is set to cool or heat and the thermostat is turned up above room temp for heat or below room temp for cooling. In both of these modes the furnace blower comes on and stays on til the room temperature is satisfied. The outdoor unit only comes on for AC the out door unit will not come on for heat or the "on" setting on the thermostat. See exception 1 & 2 below...

Exception 1- (in a heat pump the out door unit runs in both heat and cool mode unless it has emergency heat turned on then it will not come on outside in the heat mode, and depending on the type of heat pump and furnace or air handler it is). A heat pump thermostat usually has "backup heat" and an "emergency heat" setting switch on the thermostat.
Exception 2 - On some thermostats they are made to cycle on the heat if the temperature reaches a preset temp (around 50'f usually but definitely by 40'f). This mode prevents freezing when if instance the homeowner is away or while the home is under construction. In this mode the fan inside can run but the heat usually comes on with it.
Exception3 - On some electric furnaces the heating strips may be individually controlled and thus not all come on at one time. This may give the feel of no heat especially if the room is cold.

Now there may be other exceptions but Ive tried to give you a heads up on some of the most common ones.
If you need more help please post more specifics about your unit/system as to for sure what switches are set to what setting and what is happening with each. My first though was that maybe your system is OK and you needed to know if the thermostat was working properly.

If this helpd you understand your problem would you please give me as hifgh a mark as you can. Thnaks for using fixya and good luck.

Mar 28, 2009 | Carrier Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

Heat pump works in emergency heat, but not in auxiliary heat


I set the thermostat for 70 degrees. It comes on always in auxillary heat and does not shut off when it reaches 70 degrees. It is a heat pump, I am assuming, it might be the thermostat? But when the air conditioner is on, it turns off when it reaches it's temperature.

Jan 20, 2009 | Amana PTH123B25AJ Heat Pump Air...

1 Answer

Electric furnace won't shut off


It sounds like a bad or badly miswired T-stat

Jan 20, 2009 | Goodman CLQ36AR49 Air Conditioner

1 Answer

Heater running continuously


Sounds like you have a problem with your heat pump. Your aux heat is a electric coil. how old is the unit when was the last time it was serviced? How cold is it out side?

Jan 15, 2009 | Honeywell Programmable Thermostat Heater

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