Question about Mitsubishi WS-55613 55" Rear Projection HDTV

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Does it make a difference what type of cable I use for my HDMI to DVI. I used a HDMI to DVI D 28 AWG. The DVI was for a sigle not dual connection.

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The Digital Visual Interface (DVI) is a video interface standard designed to maximize the visual quality of digital display devices such as flat panel LCD computer displays and digital projectors. It was developed by an industry consortium, the Digital Display Working Group (DDWG). It is designed primarily for carrying uncompressed digital video data to a display. It is partially compatible with the HDMI standard in digital mode (DVI-D). So yes it should work fine

Posted on Jun 04, 2007

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Dvi hdmi

Some more information is needed on what you are trying to do.
Usually you can buy a HDMI to DVI cable to do the job. This may also be referred to as a PC to monitor cable.

This image may help in identifying what type of connector you have...

Feb 03, 2014 | RCA D52W20 52" Rear Projection HDTV-Ready...

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HDMI and DVI use the same encoding scheme for video purposes- the only difference is HDMI can carry audio signals and therefore have different connectors- so it is not like the lack of a picture signal is because you are using two different cables (HDMI and DVI). In theory the DVI to HDMI adapter should work.
Is there a possibility that the adapter is defective? Any bent or missing pins?
How long are the cables? If they are of poor quality, a digital signal can be lost at 20 feet. Again, in theory.
The only other thing I can thing of, off the top of my head is to ask, did you change the input selection on your t.v.'s display screen to go from the input source that you get your t.v stations from... to the input source of the Play Station?

Nov 27, 2013 | Toshiba 50HDX82 50" Rear Projection...

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I have a Zenith R57W46 TV, I am trying to connect the HDMI (From a Dish Network VIP211), to the DVI connection on the rear panel of the set, I purchased a cable that is HDMI on one end and DVI on the...

You are infact doing everything correct. More to the point and sad to say, it is the HDCP which is causing your problem. There are long drawn out explanations regarding upscaling and resolutions regarding your TV set, but to be brief, there is no proof that connecting via HDMI or DVI will actually produce any better a picture on your set than component cables. I have a sort of similar issue with my samsung 65 rear projection Tv and my PS3. The ps3 has HDMI out and my TV had DVI in, but it actually has a better picture without using those connections. I tired with an adapter for HDMI to DVI and it did work, but nothing of great quality that I had expected. With the right component cables and the correct set up on your TV, your picture should still look very sharp. I hope this helps and good luck.

Oct 27, 2009 | Zenith R57W46 57" Rear Projection...

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No picture

The model you mentioned does not have an HDMI input. Are you using a convertor from HDMI to DVI? If so there are several types of DVI cables/ inputs make sure you use the right one.

Jan 03, 2009 | Hitachi 51SWX20B 51" Rear Projection...

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Philips 60

There will be a big difference in video quality between HDMI and S-Video. If you happen to have a DVD player that uses HDMI you can upconvert your movies to 1080i if your DVD player allows it. The only problem that you might run into is your audio. HDMI has audio built into the cable and DVI does not, with the HDMI to DVI cable you are going to have to find an alternate source for your audio to travel through. If you are looking for video quality get the HDMI to DVI cable.

Dec 14, 2008 | Philips 60PW9363 60" Rear Projection...

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Sony KF50we60 hdmi-dvi sound cuts when plugging into a ht-sf2300

DVI = HDMI without the audio connectors. So basically you need to connect your audio in some different way, PS3s allow you to keep your video signal as HDMI and change the Audio signal to component, so that is one way or doing it, not sure if the blue ray players allow you to do this though.

Nov 22, 2008 | Sony Grand WEGA KF-50WE620 Television

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Hdmi and dvi

No sir, there is not such switch in menu to change input from S video to HDMI or something. Here is one suggestion, Use 3 RCA pins cable (Audio L/R & Video) to connect both unit and check/ remember TV input and same should be selected in TV menu.

Jul 29, 2008 | Hitachi 51F500 51" Rear Projection...

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HD 1080p TV

Hey peterman,

Depending on the TV model that you purchased, you may have four to five different options that you can use to make the necessary connections for your home theater: composite, component, S-video, DVI and HDMI cabling.

Composite cabling may often be considered to be the "lowest quality" type of cable that you can use to connect two devices in your home theater, and generally consists of three color-coded cables: one yellow, one red and one white. While the yellow cable is typically used to transmit the video signal to your TV, the red and white cables transmit the right and left audio channels respectively. Composite video is somewhat limited in the fact that it is primarily intended for use with analog TV sets - by using composite cabling you may limit the quality of picture your HDTV is able to display.

Analog component cabling then can be viewed as a “step up” from composite cabling. Rather than transmitting video information over a single cable, component cabling instead uses three. Each of these cables transmits a different portion of a video image, and can often be found in bundles with one red, one green and one blue cable. Please keep in mind that component cabling still requires the use of a secondary cable to carry an audio signal, which may need to be purchased separately.

The primary benefit of using component over composite cabling is that many users may report a cleaner, more brilliant image on their TV as a result. This is not a guarantee however, as picture quality is often based as much on personal preference as it is the actual configuration and settings of the equipment used.

Often considered “in-between” composite and component cabling is S-video. Like component video, S-video cables split the information sent to your TV into multiple analog signals…two signals, to be precise. Unlike component video however, these two separate signals are sent using the same cable. Again, when using this type of connection a separate cable for audio signals is necessary.

DVI cabling is the first truly digital option available to most consumers. While it only carries a video signal (like its analog counterparts), DVI cabling can frequently be found connecting computers to monitors or digital projectors. These types of cables will have a unique shape that prevents them from being used as anything other than a video connection, and were designed to optimize signals transmitted from external devices to a visual display.

HDMI on the other hand, is another widely available digital alternative. Unlike DVI, HDMI cables support both video and audio signals, allowing consumers to avoid the proverbial “rat’s nest” behind a home theater system that one might encounter when using multiple cables.

Because HDMI cabling was developed to be backwards compatible with DVI, HDMI and DVI connections may often be able to be used interchangeably using special adaptors. Essentially, if your HD receiver/Blu-ray player only has DVI outputs and your HDTV only has HDMI inputs, you may still be able to connect those devices to your HDTV using the proper accessories.

While some major retailers may recommend using HDMI cables first and foremost over the other alternatives, this does not necessarily always make them the best choice to use. The quality of an image displayed on an HDTV will always be dependent as much on the TV itself, as it is on personal preference and other external devices. Yes, the type of cables used does play a part, but they should never be treated as the only factor to consider when setting up your home theater.

Should you have any questions or lingering doubts, I would strongly suggest speaking with a Magnolia Home Theater agent at your local Best Buy™ store for more information. Most stores will have similar TV's on display using more than one type of connection, and sales associates are always able to provide additional suggestions if desired.

Hope this helps you out.

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Jun 24, 2008 | Projection Televisions

1 Answer

Ps3 hdmi to dvi on mitsubishi wd52327

What brand DVI connector and how many pins are on the connector. try a different cable

Dec 25, 2007 | Mitsubishi WD-52327 52" Rear Projection...

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