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Increaseing sshutter speed when using flash

I am using a SB900 speedlight with a D2Xs body and 85mm 2.8D lens. As soon as I switch the flash on it defaults to 1/60 shutter speed and I can't set it hight to avoid camera shake. I want to set the shutter at 1/125 but still use TTL. Is it possible and can someone tell me how please. Thanks Michael from Yorkshire

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Michael,
Make sure of the compatibility of the flash unit and the camera body, The D2X is a pro camera that came out in 2005 and it was the flagship for DSLR's at the time,the camera should very well sync to the flash as long as the camera and flash can communicate. There shouldn't be an issue with a newer Nikon flash unit unless there was a change in the hotshoe connection, bring both in to a reputable camera shop and compare the hotshoe with a newer Nikon.

randy320sgi

Posted on Jan 07, 2009

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Camera not recognizing speed light


There can be so many things you changed. The Nikon camera, can be set to TTL, DTL and several manual settings for the optional speed light. Then you can switch the flash off, so It would be very difficult to see what went on in your camera. Try making a picture with the camera in full automatic. (green camera logo on the main dial) If that works, go into the menu and check the settings. (use the manual.)

Feb 03, 2014 | Nikon D5100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Nikon d700 hotshoe missfire with flash nikon sb900


Probably a loose hotshoe. This is a common problem with the D700 hotshoe and SB900 combo. The weight of the SB900 eventually loosens the hotshoe, meaning the internal screws holding the hotshoe in place loosens.

Nov 13, 2012 | Nikon D700 Digital Camera

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Hi I have used my canon camera eos 400d with the 17-85 mm canon lense for nearly 2 years. Since last week i am encouttering the error 99 < replace the battery and try again>.I did this...


The lens most probably has dirty contact between the lens and camera body. It only worked with the "default" lens because you disturbed the dirt removing the 17-85 lens.

Here is what I'm suggesting, seeing you said the problem was solved by changing out the lens.

Clean the contact both on the lens and camera body with a pencil eraser, hold the camera body so the lens cavity is pointed downward and lightly polish the contacts don't use a puffer to clean the area you will just blow dirt into the camera.

Do the same with the lens contacts and you will be good to go

Mar 30, 2011 | Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera with 17-85mm...

1 Answer

Canon on nikon


The Canon lenses are FD mount which means that you will need to get an adaptor to convert the FD mount to fit the F mount on the Nikon. An example of the mount can be seen here:

http://www.rugift.com/photocameras/canon-fd-nikon-adapter.htm

As for the speedlights the hotshoe mount will accept them on your Nikon, put them on with fresh batteries and try them out.

Jan 13, 2010 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

1 Answer

I have a Nikon D2Xs with a 2.8 17-55 lens. I cannot get clarity and sharpness for football games on the field and/or cheerleading in the gym and on the football field. My daughter is a high school...


Depending on how far away you are from the action, the flash is most probably not strong enough to be effective...in fact, it's probably making your camera underexpose every shot. Turn off the flash and turn up the ISO to 400 or even 800.

Sep 13, 2009 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

Sometimes when i'm taking picture my flash wont stop blinking for a few seconds.


The 400D uses flash assisted focusing. In low light conditions the auto focus cannot get a focus lock so it pops the flash a few times so the lens has a chance to focus. You will notice this will go away when in the manual focus mode (the switch on the side of the lens).

The only way around this problem (as people in a photo think the photo has already been taken and looks away when the camera actually takes the picture) is to use a hotshoe mounted TTL Canon Speedlight (430ex or 580ex) which use an infra-red focussing beam.

Sep 04, 2009 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera

2 Answers

Error 99


the lens contacts are dirty - get a pencil with an eraser on the end, just a regular old pencil with a red rubber eraser. Detach the lens from the camera, hold it so that the lens’ gold contacts are pointing down and lightly erase their exposed surface, cleaning them of any hand oil that might have gotten on them. Do the same thing with the gold contacts inside the camera body. This is a bit harder but it’s doable: just hold camera so lens opening points down so no gunk falls in. Erase lightly. I've used a lens cloth and dabbed at the contacts rather than blow them so as not to blow the erasings inside the camera.
Works well for me....let me know how you fair!

Mar 16, 2009 | Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera with 17-85mm...

1 Answer

Taking dark pictures, any suggestion, advise on setting?


Press i think it is upwards on your little d-pad.
put the exposure up more.
May let more light in?

Jan 08, 2009 | Canon EOS-20D Digital Camera with 17-85mm...

3 Answers

No Flash & "Speed light is in the close position"


I had the same problem and found a solution at http://photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg?msg_id=0089WF

It worked for me.

There are 3 simple solutions which will not cost you anything. I used the first method for 1+ years till I discovered the 2nd and 3rd method just now, which should solve your problem easily for good (hopefully).
1. After the speedlight pops up, use your hand to touch (depress softly and let go softly) the button that normally locks the speedlight. To find this button/protrusion, look carefully in the region from which the light pops up. You will see a tiny black piece protruding out. This piece matches the cavity on the back of the speedlight. So it should be easy to find. Try pressing the button and then letting it go. If the error message doesn't go away, try pressing it once again and then check the monitor again. This method may take several tries.
2. A simpler solution is to use your hand to slow down the speedlight as it pops up. The goal is to prevent a violent shake when the speedlight unit pops open. So use your hand to let the unit slowly come to open.
3. A more permanent fix is to put something in the camera to cushion the shake as the speedlight pops open. If you look carefully how the speedlight opens, you will see that there is a plastic rod, one end of which is attached to the speedlight and the other end glides along a track/groove as the unit opens. Just put some sticky soft substance at the end of groove where the rod will come to rest when the unit opens. Put such substance there so it will "permanently" cushion the opening. One such substance you can find easily is the type of glue many magazines use to stick ads/CDs,etc. to the pages. As far as I know, you CANNOT get such glue easily in stores, but those used sticky glues in magazines are good enough and you just need a tiny bit. I happened to have bought some such glues recently from http://www.gluefast.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=21_27&products_id=28
for no other reason than that I have always been fascinated by such glues. You really don't need to buy these because they come in large quantities and you can just use the magazine glues I mentioned. (some call these "peel and stick glue" and some call it "fugitive glue".) Yet another possibility that should work but might not provide as much buffering/cushioning power is to cut a tiny piece of eraser that fits tightly into the end of the groove.
Hope these belated tips help you somehow.

Jan 31, 2008 | Nikon Coolpix 4500 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Shadow on image when using built-in Speedlight


The built-in Speedlight on many Nikon cameras is designed to be a convenient way to either light up a dark subject or to add fill light to a daytime scene. The built-in Speedlight cannot replace a full size, external speedlight which should be used when more power or coverage are needed. Because the built-in Speedlight is compact and close to the camera it cannot be used under all conditions. When using a lens that is physically very long, a subject that is very close, or a wide lens hood it is possible that a shadow may be cast upon the subject. Notice, in the sample below, the round shadow in the bottom center of the photo. When the lens is too long or the coverage is too wide with a close subject a shadow of the lens itself is cast. In figure "A" below the lens is casting a shadow. Switching (or zooming) to a shorter lens (figure "B") prevents the shadow and allows even illumination. If your lens, subject, or lens hood choice create a shadow, an external flash (either on the camera's hot-shoe or connected to the camera by a wire or wirelessly) should be used to fully light the subject.

Aug 30, 2005 | Nikon D70 Digital Camera with 18-50mm Lens

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