Question about ASUS M2N-E SLI (M2N-E SLI GREEN) Motherboard

1 Answer

Can not get into setup; shuts down when trying...

Well, I appreciate the help, but sad to say it did not work. I have changed the position of the ram, cleared the cmos by using the jumper and removing the battery, did a barebones check, took the board out of the case, had only the MB, power supply, and video, tried a known working IDE hard drive with Windows XP and still no luck. When it prompts me to press the DEL key to enter setup, it will attempt to enter the setup (with a rare quick split second sight of the setup screen), then the machine will shut down. I would think that you could access the BIOS setup without all the fancy gizmos attached. Allowing to get to the screen with the options of Safe Mode, Last known good configuation, start windows normally, I have tried all of the options, but all it does is sits there with the Windows XP screen and the bar moving. I removed the CPU, put new heatsink on it and secured it tight, still nothing. I have spent hours searching for a similar problem and have followed the given advice where I find it, but still nothing. I have swapped several keyboards and hard drive power cables, plugging it in every conceivable place I could find, but still the same results.

Was wondering if I should add the water cooling fan that says, ''for use in junction with Passive Cooler or Water Cooler ONLY'' to the top of the square ''snowflake'' on the MB (if that is where it goes), but on the fan package it says that installing the optional fan with an active CPU cooler will interfere with internal CPU cooler airflow and endanger system stability''. Looking through the MB box it came in, I notice a flat ribbon with ASUS stamped on it, about 3 inches long and about 1 inch wide with a rectangle box type connection at each end with slots for some sort of connection. Does this need to be installed??

Questions, questions. Such trouble just for what I thought would be a halfway decent computer that was given to me...now I know why it was replaced. At this point I am beginning to think I have a bad motherboard. I also gave thought to a bad power supply (400 watt), but not totally convinced on that, even considered a 600 watt replacement. So, with all this in mind should I just junk out the MB?

Thank you again in advance for your patience and help.

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  • skidoonordic Jan 11, 2009

    Thank you very much for your solution! I did get a 700w ($169) PSU at Best Buy and it worked!! My hat's off to you and this site!

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After all you have tried, I would not bother with the water cooling. If the board does not work with air cooling, water cooling won't bring it around.

And in my opinion 400w is too small. I would not power the board with anything smaller than 750w, and don't use a cheap $29 power supply either. Power is the lifeblood of your system. Stick with good quality name brand power supplies.

Posted on Jan 06, 2009

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How to clear an unknown BIOS password.


<span><span>Clear using jumper (recommended)</span><br /> <p><b>Precaution:</b> When inside the computer please be sure you're aware of the potential damage that can be caused by <a href="http://www.computerhope.com/esd.htm">ESD</a>.<br /> <p><img src="jumper.jpg" />On the computer <a href="http://www.computerhope.com/help/mb.htm">motherboard</a> locate the BIOS clear / password <a href="http://www.computerhope.com/help/jumpers.htm">jumper or dipswitch</a> and change its position. This jumper is often labeled CLEAR, CLEAR CMOS, JCMOS1, CLR, CLRPWD, PASSWD, PASSWORD, PSWD or PWD as shown in the picture to the right. To change the jumper simply remove it from the two pins its currently on so that it covers the pin that is not covered. For example, in the picture to the right pins 1 and 2 are covered, you'd remove the jumper and put it on pins 2 and 3.<br /> <p>Once this jumper has been changed, turn on the computer and the password should be cleared. Once cleared, turn the computer off and return the jumper or dipswitch to its original position.<br /> <p>The location of the jumpers or dipswitches are dependent on the manufacturer of the computer and motherboard. However, below are some general ideas on where to find it. Remember that most motherboards could have dozens of different jumpers, make sure you're changing the CMOS jumper and not something else. If these general suggestions do not help refer to your motherboard / computer documentation or skip to the next step.<br /> <ol> <li><b>On the edge of the motherboard</b> - Most jumpers are located on the side of the motherboard for easy accessibility, verify by looking at all visible edges of the motherboard.</li> <li><b>By the CMOS battery</b> - Some manufactures will place the jumper to clear the CMOS / BIOS password by the actual <a href="http://www.computerhope.com/jargon/c/cmos.htm">CMOS</a> battery.</li> <li><b>By the processor</b> - Some manufactures will place the jumpers by the processor of the computer.</li> <li><b>Under the keyboard or bottom of laptop</b> - If you are working on a <a href="http://www.computerhope.com/jargon/l/laptop.htm">laptop computer</a> the location of the dipswitch (almost never a jumper) can be under the keyboard or on the bottom of the laptop in a compartment such as the memory compartment.</li> <li><b>Other visible location</b> - While it is possible that the jumpers / dipswitches may not be in a visible location, most manufactures try to make things easier by placing the jumpers / dipswitches in another visible location.</li></ol><span>Remove CMOS battery</span><br /> <p><img src="cmos.gif" />Removing the CMOS battery like the one shown in the picture to the right will cause the system to loose all CMOS settings including the password. To do this locate and remove the <a href="http://www.computerhope.com/help/cmos.htm">CMOS battery</a> on the<a href="http://www.computerhope.com/help/mb.htm">motherboard</a> for at least five-minutes. After this has been done put the battery back into the computer and turn it back on.<br /><span>Jump the CMOS solder beads</span><br /> <p>Older computers and especially older laptops don't have jumpers or dipswitches and require the user to jump a pair of solder beads on a circuit board. The identification and location of these solder beads can vary and if not available in computer documentation is only obtainable through the computer manufacturer.<br /> <p>If you've identified the solder beads they can be jumped by placing a flat-head screwdriver over the two beads and leaving it on those beads while turning on the computer. Once the computer has booted turn off the computer and then remove the screwdriver.<br /></span>

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JBAT1 is right next to the SATA2 connector.

Clear CMOS Jumper: JBAT1
There is a CMOS RAM on board that has a power from external battery to keep the data of system
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You can clear CMOS by shorting 2-3 pin while the system is off. Then return to 1-2 pin position.
Avoid clearing the CMOS while the system is on; it will damage the mainboard.

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Try using generic CMOS passwords. A complete listing of these passwords can be found on document CH000451.
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There are utilities designed to help bypass CMOS passwords. An example of a great utility to decrypt / bypass BIOS passwords is the PC BIOS Security and Maintenance toolkit, which is available by clicking here.
Clear using jumper (recommended)

Precaution: When inside the computer please be sure you're aware of the potential damage that can be caused by ESD.

jumper.jpgOn the computer motherboard locate the BIOS clear / password jumper or dipswitch and change its position. This jumper is often labeled CLEAR, CLEAR CMOS, JCMOS1, CLR, CLRPWD, PASSWD, PASSWORD, PSWD or PWD as shown in the picture to the right. To change the jumper simply remove it from the two pins its currently on so that it covers the pin that is not covered. For example, in the picture to the right pins 1 and 2 are covered, you'd remove the jumper and put it on pins 2 and 3.

Once this jumper has been changed, turn on the computer and the password should be cleared. Once cleared, turn the computer off and return the jumper or dipswitch to its original position.

The location of the jumpers or dipswitches are dependent on the manufacturer of the computer and motherboard. However, below are some general ideas on where to find it. Remember that most motherboards could have dozens of different jumpers, make sure you're changing the CMOS jumper and not something else. If these general suggestions do not help refer to your motherboard / computer documentation or skip to the next step.

  1. On the edge of the motherboard - Most jumpers are located on the side of the motherboard for easy accessibility, verify by looking at all visible edges of the motherboard.
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  4. Under the keyboard or bottom of laptop - If you are working on a laptop computer the location of the dipswitch (almost never a jumper) can be under the keyboard or on the bottom of the laptop in a compartment such as the memory compartment.
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Remove CMOS battery

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Older computers and especially older laptops don't have jumpers or dipswitches and require the user to jump a pair of solder beads on a circuit board. The identification and location of these solder beads can vary and if not available in computer documentation is only obtainable through the computer manufacturer.

If you've identified the solder beads they can be jumped by placing a flat-head screwdriver over the two beads and leaving it on those beads while turning on the computer. Once the computer has booted turn off the computer and then remove the screwdriver.

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