Question about RCA RT2390 System

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Rca rt 2870 surround sound system

When using the digital coaxial cable input it sounds like the people and sounds are missing words or phrases maybe talking under water. tried new dvd player. tried new coaxial cable.

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6 Suggested Answers

SOURCE: Connecting my Medion surround sound to my Sony dvd recorder

u need an amplifier (5.1), u put the two outputs in, and then theres loads of outputs coming out of yer amp. hey presto, im doing the same thing at my uni flat, but i need the amp. peace out x

Posted on Jan 02, 2008

Testimonial: "Excellent help Thanks"

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: rca rt 2500

do you have antennas hooked up to the back? if you do, make sure they reach a high place.

Posted on Feb 29, 2008

johwros
  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: RCA RTD 215 audio input

After posting my question on Fixya, I went to www.cnet.com and found reviews on 3 systems $100-200 which had coaxial digital audio inputs.

Posted on Oct 08, 2008

  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: RCA RT2280 surround sound mode button wont select 5.1 dolby digital mode.

I had the same problem and this is what I did to fix it. Assuming that all of your equipment is powered on, (tv, blu-ray/dvd, rca receiver) you'll need to go into your dvd players audio menu and select the dolby digital audio.
Once you do this, the digital signal is sent to your receiver from the dvd. The receiver should automatically set itself to the dolby digital preset. If it doesn't, press the surround button until you reach it. I found part of this information here. And the rest was personal experience.
Also, it depends on if the disc format is in dolby 5.1. I hope this helps you.

Posted on Dec 28, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Hooking up the RT 2600

I dont know ware or what to hook up and how

Posted on Jan 02, 2009

  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have a new 52"

I have the same situation....what I have done is connected my Blue ray to the TV via the HDMI connection and the audio to the RTDVD1 via an Optical cable. I find this is the best connection and sound reproduction so far. The input of the RTDVD is the SAT/Optical input and then switch the source to SAT/OPT. You will have to make adjustments in the BlueRay player's audio setup to enable the 5.1 DB digital sound etc.

Posted on Feb 28, 2009

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Adding another device to the system


Well, if analog works for you connect the CD player's analog RCA cables to the VCR inputs.

Can you imagine why you NEED to have the TV audio coming into the receiver from the TV? Are the TV's audio system or speakers superior to the audio section of every other source of TV-related programming? We hope not. Does the TV receive any programming that the receiver can not? Maybe games. I imagaine this MIGHT justify running analog TV audio back to the receiver.

Your cable box and your DVD player have both digital and analog audio outputs. The gray area is what your TV has for audio inputs. It could survive with simple RCA analog audio in from both and none to or from the receiver. Then you could watch Lo-Fi cable and DVD's without the receiver turned on.

That would free up the TV analog audio input for other things.

I imagine your DVD player is using one of the digital inputs on the receiver. If you have one each optical and coaxial audio output among your DVD and Cable Box you could place them in the two available diigital inputs.

Now, what about the CD's digital output? For stereo music you're not likely to be able to hear any difference between it and the analog input BUT it can still be connected digitally IF it has a coaxial output. Coaxial digital inputs can be shared.

Get an RCA-splitter and join the two units entering the coaxial audio input just before they enter that connection. Either will work just fine if you TURN THE OTHER ONE OFF when you want to us it.

Mar 19, 2010 | RCA RT2760 System

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DVD PLAYER to TV HOOKUP


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Basic DVD player hookup to TV cable diagram. RCA cable (yellow) video and RCA cables (white and red) audio. This is all you need for picture and sound. If your TV only has a single RF input, then you need a RF modulator. RF modulators accept the yellow, white and red cables and output a coaxial cable to the TV single input jack. Usually the TV is tuned to channel 3 or 4 to pickup the RF modulators output.

Alternative connection options are many and include HDMI for HDTVs, component video and for sound, surround sound digital audio connection using optical or coaxial digital audio cable.

Surround sound requires a decoder such as a A/V receiver with Dolby Digital 5.1 or DTS 5.1 or more. 6 speakers connected to the A/V receiver surrounds the listener.

Bluray players will play DVDs and Bluray discs. Bluray gives you High Definition video and typically connects to a HDTV using a HDMI cable.
dvd_howtoconnect.htm
for more information and pictures on DVD player hookups.

on Aug 17, 2010 | Home Theater Systems

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How to set up a seven-speaker home theater system


Set up a home theater

How to connect your speakers

In order to deliver surround sound, home theater systems require 5, 6, or even 7 speakers--and that's not even counting the subwoofer. Connecting all those speakers together can be quite a challenge, so here's a quick overview of the basics.

If you don't have an all-in-one, home-theater-in-a-box system, you'll probably need to supply your own speaker cables. There are several different types available--they vary in terms of wire size (or gauges) and termination types. Make sure you pick cable that's a good match for your speakers and receiver. And make sure they're long enough; the rear-channel cables in particular will be stretching all the way around the room.

Once you've selected your system and have all your speakers ready to set up, begin by placing each speaker at or near its intended location. Then, attach the cables to them one by one. After securely fastening one end of the cable to the speaker, connect the other end to the appropriate speaker output on the back of the A/V receiver. Be sure to connect the cable to the correctly labeled output.

For instance, the front-right speaker wire needs to go to the terminal labeled front-right. Also, make sure that each speaker connection is in phase, meaning negative to negative and positive to positive. Otherwise, your system's sound will sound out of whack. Repeat the process for every speaker in your system. Note that the subwoofer uses a coaxial-style RCA cable instead of standard speaker wire.

Once all the wires are connected, you should test the system with several DVDs and CDs, to ensure that everything is in working order.

For our first example, we used an elaborate 7.1-channel system, so it may have 1, 2, or several more speakers than your system. Some systems even employ wireless rear speakers, or virtual surround-surround modes that simulate multichannel experience from 3, 2, or even 1 speaker. And some listeners still prefer good old stereo sound from 2 speakers. No matter what type of speaker setup you prefer, however, the wiring basics remain the same.

How to position surround-sound speakers and a subwoofer
To get the best performance from a surround-sound speaker system, you must install each speaker in the correct location. There are three basic types of surround-sound speaker systems.

  • The 5.1-channel system has five satellite speakers and a subwoofer.

  • 6.1-channel systems have six satellites and a subwoofer.

  • And 7.1-channel systems have seven satellites and a subwoofer.

Start by placing the center speaker either directly above or directly below your TV. The center speaker can be perched atop a direct-view TV or mounted on the wall. Aim the center speaker at ear level.

In most cases, the front-left and front-right speakers can be wall mounted or placed on stands. However, if your speakers have rear-panel bass ports, they should not be wall mounted. Space your front-left and front-right speakers the same distance apart as the distance between your center speaker and your listening position. Position the front-left and front-right speakers no more than two feet above or below the front-center speaker. The tweeters in the front-left and front-right speakers should be roughly at ear level relative to your seating position.

Ideally, the surround-left and surround-right speakers should be mounted on the side walls of your room, slightly behind or parallel to your listening position. If your speakers have rear-panel bass ports, place them on stands instead. If installing the speakers on the side walls isn't practical, you can mount them on the room's rear wall or place them on stands behind your listening position. The surround speakers can be installed up to two feet above the front speakers.

Also, 6.1 surround systems have a back-center speaker. You'll typically mount this on the rear wall of your room, centered behind your seating position. Position the back-center speaker no more than six feet behind the surround-left and surround-right speakers. If your speaker has a rear-panel bass port or if the rear wall is too far behind your seating position, place the back center speaker on a stand instead. The back-center speaker should be installed at the same height as the surround-left and surround-right speakers.

Instead of a single back speaker, 7.1 surround systems use a back-left and a back-right speaker. These, too, are typically mounted on the rear wall of your room. Position the back-left and back-right speakers so that each is approximately aligned with the left and right edges of your listening position. Place the back-left and back-right speakers no more than six feet behind the surround-left and surround-right speakers. If your speakers have rear-panel bass ports,or if the rear wall is too far behind your seating position, place the speakers on stands instead. Install the back-left and back-right speakers at the same height as the surround-left and surround-right speakers.

A subwoofer is the last component of a 5, 6, or 7.1 system. Because bass frequencies are nondirectional, you can place the subwoofer in various locations. You may get the best performance by installing the subwoofer in the front of the room, approximately six inches from the wall. If you want more bass, try placing the sub near a corner in the front of the room.

Connect your DVD player to your A/V receiver--digitally
To hear a movie's soundtrack in surround sound, you must first connect your DVD player to an A/V surround-sound receiver. You'll need to make what is called a multi-channel-compatible connection.

The easiest way to do this is to use a cable that carries a digital signal. There are two digital options: optical and coaxial.

An optical digital connection, also called TosLink, uses pulses of light to deliver a digital signal. According to some experts, one advantage of optical digital connections is that optical cables don't pick up noise, while lower-quality coaxial cables can. Many, but not all, DVD players have an optical output. Most A/V receivers have at least one and usually multiple optical inputs. Plug one end of the optical cable into the DVDs player's optical-out jack. Plug the other end into the receiver's optical input.

Finally, you need to tell your receiver to use the optical connection whenever you switch to the DVD input. This is called assigning the input. Information about this simple process can be found in your A/V receiver's manual.

A second option is a coaxial digital connection. This type of connection is also used for cable TV, but the connectors are different. This type of coaxial cable has an RCA connector. Coaxial cables are less expensive than optical ones. In fact, you can use any old RCA cable to make a coaxial digital connection, and you won't lose any audio quality.

Most, but not all, DVD players, have a coaxial output. Some have coaxial and optical outputs, so you get a choice. Audiophiles argue over which connection is better, but it's very hard to hear the difference. Most A/V receivers have at least one and usually multiple coaxial inputs. Plug one end of the coaxial cable into the DVD player's coaxial-out jack. Plug the other end into the receiver's coaxial input.

Finally, tell your receiver to use the coaxial connection whenever you switch to the DVD input. Again, your A/V receiver's manual will have instructions for assigning an input.

on Aug 13, 2010 | Home Theater Systems

1 Answer

Why cant I supply my onkyo surround sound system


You need to assign the HDMI input(s) to the functions they represent, using the Front Panel Tuning/Preset control...

If you connect a video component to an HDMI input, you must assign that HDMI Input to an input selector in Setup.
For example, you could assign the “DVD” setting to “IN1”, and assign the
“CBL/SAT” setting to “IN2”.

Likewise if you use digital audio inputs...

Assigning the Digital Input
If there’s no sound, press the [DIGITAL INPUT] button repeatedly until sound is heard. The digital input is now properly assigned.
If you connect your DVD player to the AV receiver’s COAXIAL 1 DIGITAL IN, and your cable/satellite receiver
to the COAXIAL 2 DIGITAL IN, as shown, it’s not necessary
to assign the digital input.

Feb 12, 2010 | Onkyo HT-S5100 Theater System

1 Answer

Jvc no sound when i have tv on


If your using a cable box or dss or fios, use whatever "input" your system has. preferably optical, or digital coaxial. all cable boxes dss and fios receivers have both optical and digital coaxial outputs as well as standard rca.

If your not using a cable box and are direct from the TV to the stereo, then it depends what the TV has. Most TV's have at least a "monitor out" that's analog rca. If you've got an LCD, Plasma, or digital TV, chances are you have an optical out. All that you really need to make sure of is whatever input you use on the JVC, when you want to listen to TV, it's got to be set on that input from the front. ie DVD/DTV/Vid 1/ Vid2/etc showing on the JVC display. That's the input on the back you must use to hear it. If you have any more questions, just post a comment and I can help some more. Hope this helps

Jun 24, 2009 | JVC TH-G30 Theater System

1 Answer

MX 3950D Philips - PS3 no sound


Aside from the xbox360 working via the coaxial digital cable. I got the PS3 to work this way.

I had to use the supplied SCART > (Y-video) (Red-Audio) (White-Audio) cable. Basically plugged this in from the PS3 directly to the MX 3950D Aux (Auxiliary) audio input.

On the PS3 audio settings menu, switched from HDMI to the 3rd option SCART.

Turn on the MX 3950D and set to Aux. Bang, got sound again.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I missed this cause I "assumed" the video/audio cable that came with the PS3 was a HDMI to Audio/Video cable, and didn't even see the SCART port in the back of the PS3. So I thought I didn't want to lose 1080p ..etc etc. Anyways. MX 3950D still good =)

May 18, 2009 | Philips MX3950 System

1 Answer

No sound from speakers


This isn't going to be a one-size-fits-all answer. Nor is the exact cause necessarily going to be one switch setting wrong.

Let's start with something as simple as possible.

Tune an FM station so nothing could possibly be cable-related. Get your sound set up with that in simple Stereo then we can move on to tackling individual source problems and 5.1.

The various other devices you're using for HDMI have menus themselves that could be causing problems with each of them.

For your DVD or Blu-Ray. If it has a Coaxial Digital Output, run it to the Coax In DVD input to test the audio from that device. One conductor of a standard RCA cable will suffice. If it works but the HDMI doesn't we'll deal with it later. If it doesn't work, the device is the problem (setup, most likely).

Try the same with anything else that doesn't work via HDMI, if you have a Coax Digital Output on it.

----
Device doesn't work through HDMI or Coaxial Digital:

I would suggest careful examination of one problematic device's settings, say, the DVD. Debug it using the analog outputs first since they're the simplest. Connect it's L/R output to the AUX input. Once you're sure the program can play and produce audio, go back to debugging the HDMI input and see how that works out.

If it works, use the DVD to test the other non-working HDMI input. Just swing it over there and if the receiver is set up properly you will hear it. If it's good, go to your other HDMI source, say, Blu-Ray or Cable Box, and plug it into the input you just certified to debug it. See?

Note: Don't take the labeling of the HDMI inputs literally. They are not married to the device types their labels imply. Freely interchange among them.

-------
Page 60 of the manual talks about setting the IN MODE:

http://www.retrevo.com/d/df/3296084121.pdf?doc=c1d7943b3452671181ba96ea8d8eb818&ts=1238883549637

Apr 04, 2009 | Sony HT-SS2000 Theater System

1 Answer

No 5.1 surround when adding a Philips upconvert player to the San


Sounds like you are getting analog signals from your componet cables and a true digital input from your HDMI into your tv.

However that unit is Analog audio input x 1 only.
So i dont think your going to get true digital surround sound.
The problem being

Sanyo =

Inputs: Analog Audio x 1 Outputs: Composite x 1 · S-Video x 1 · Component x 1 · Digital Audio Coaxial x

Feb 03, 2009 | Sanyo DWM-2500 System

2 Answers

No Sound In Home Theater with Dish HDTV DVR Dual Mode Remote Connection


HDTV is not carried via coaxial cable from tuner, you need HDMI or the 5 RCA cables that are different colors. I forget if they are called component or composite, I think they are called composite, the R and W are sound. If you run the HDMI or composite cables to your TV, there should be a variable out or audio out on the back of the TV that outputs ANY sound coming into the TV, like Wii, DVD, tv, etc. So if you want to listen to tv sound, just pipe the audio out to the receivers available input and turn it up. Cant be used with mag input (turntable) all others are compatible. Did this answer your question? Sat cables are usually kept under 130 ft from the dish, and the dish receiver can output coaxial signal over 400ft on RG-6 cable. HDMI is limited and can get very expensive. Does your sat box have a coaxial digital out (orange RCA) you can use that if your receiver can read it, usually associated with the DVD input or video input, but only for digital encoded programs.

May 19, 2008 | Insignia 5.1-Ch. Home Theater System with...

2 Answers

Is Sony DAV-S500 optical input compatible with optical output from Pioneer DVD player DV-566K?


I don't think this has an Optical but a Coaxial connection. You might try a coaxial audio cable not optical.

Dec 30, 2007 | Sony DAV-S500 System

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