Question about Canon Zoom Telephoto EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS (Image Stabilizer) USM Autofocus Lens

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Lens stops functioning

Lens arbitrarily stops working for temporary time frames. aperture display becomes "00". shutter display is frozen. stabilizer becomes erratic with large amplitude motions. sometimes camera battery icon shows empty. shutting off the lens stabilizer and/or the lens autofocus doesn't help. camera is canon A2 (film), this doesn't happen with other lenses. problem sometimes disappears after lens is removed from camera and re-attached, can then re-appear. recently the lens PCB was replaced, but phenomenon re-appeared.

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Re: lens stops functioning

Have you tried this same lens with other cameras? Do you have another camera body you can try? or perhaps a friend with a Canon EOS Camera? Also try the following please: Remove the lens. Look at the lens mount contacts, take a Cotton swap with some rubbing Alchol & clean the contacts very well, both on the lens and the camera body. Is your camera reading the lens aperture range correctly (at least most of the time)? Also since you replaced the PCB on the lens, isn't it under warranty? Let me know if this works. Thank you, AJ.

Posted on Sep 21, 2007

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Can't change f stop on nikon d5100

Confused. The f stop is changed on the lens unless some auto setting is used. Does camera work with other lens? If so, lens needs to go to a lens shop for repair.

Apr 10, 2014 | Nikon Camera Lenses

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Zenzanon 80

The lens does not have a shutter - that's in the camera body. The lens contains the aperture or f stop adjustment. It is done by injecting or retracting blades in the light stream of the lens barrel between the front and rear optics. Check the aperture blades to see if they move easily and open equally by varying the f-stop ring on the lens while looking through it. If not moving all the blades the same amount or it does not continue to restrict the opening as you increase the f-stop value, there's something wrong with the lens.

Are you sure you haven't accidentally activated any exposure compensation adjustment on the camera body?

Jan 10, 2012 | Bronica 80mm f/2.8 Zenzanon-PS Lens

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I bought this lense and need instant help. I am shooting pics at a high school football game and it gets dark early. What settings do I switch my camera to in order to get sufficient light and capture all...

Shooting sports and the evening can be a compromise between needed s fast shutter to stop action or a longer shutter to allow enough light for a good exposure. Fortunately, you've got a "fast" lens. My suggestions are:

Shoot in "A" mode (aperture priority) and change the aperture of the lens to the lowest number available to make the aperture open to maximum, and increase the ISO to 400 or 800. You may even get satisfactory results at ISO1600, but you should check the results on a computer screen before blindly going out shooting at the level.

By increasing the aperture, two things happen; exposure times are reduced to minimum so that motion is stopped (or blur minimized) and the the depth of field becomes very narrow or "shallow". Depth of field or "DOF" describes the distance in front and beyond the point of focus that will also be in focus. Large apertures (low "f" number s like 1.4 to 2.8 ) = narrow DOF and small apertures (high "f" numbers like 16 to 22 and beyond) = wide DOF. An example would be if you took a picture of someone's face from a2 feet away at f 1.4 and focused on the tip of the nose - the eyes would begin to get soft or out of focus - the ears would be even more noticeable - and that background would very blurred. The same picture at f 22 nearly everything would be in focus - except for maybe the background - depending how far behind it is from the subject's head. Check the example below:

Look at the backgrounds of the pictures above. The left is largely in focus at f 8 while the right is blurry at f 2.5. Had left been shot at f 22 or more, more of the background would be in focus.

Increasing the ISO to 400 or 800 increases the camera's sensitivity to light like film. The higher the ISO, the less time it takes to get a properly exposed picture. High ISO are helpful in low light situations or other times you need to have a faster shutter speed (for sports or don't have a tripod for pictures that need long exposures). Assume you want to take a picture of something that the camera tells you won't be exposed correctly unless you shoot at say for example f 2.8 and shutter is 1/30 second. If the camera ISO was set to 100, you could change it to 200. This doubles the sensitivity to light - meaning you need 1/2 the light; you can change the f number from f 2.8 to f 4, OR, leave it at 2.8 and increase the shutter speed to the next faster value 1/60 sec. If you change the ISO to 400, it is now 4x's sensitive than 100 (or 2x's than 200). At ISO 400, you could go two f stops smaller to f 5.6 or stay at 2.8 and increase shutter from 1/30 to 1/125. For ISO 800, you could go three f stops smaller to f 8 or stay at 2.8 and increase shutter from 1/30 to 1/250. You can mix and match, too. Go one up on the speed and two smaller on the aperture. The drawback to higher ISOs is that the pictures become grainier with each increase. Eventually, the pictures don't look good when you get into ISO numbers above 800 (or less on some DSLR cameras - and even less on point and shoot types). You have to experiment to find where your preferences are. See below for Low and High ISO comparison shots:

The left picture above has nice, smooth transitions between shades of colors - the right picture has a grainy appearance called "noise". Some is acceptable but others are not - it depends what YOU can live with. Sometimes it's better to have a grainy shot than nothing at all.

Lastly, you can shoot "S" for shutter mode, to control motion instead of "A" which controls volume of light instead. The same principles apply.

I hope this helps & good luck!

Sep 08, 2011 | Tamron SP AF 70200mm f28 Di LD IF Makro...

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The S and M modes on the black images when taking a pic; any idea why?

I'd say you're severely underexposing. The M mode is for manual exposure. This means you're responsible for setting the appropriate shutter speed and aperture. The aperture controls how much light passes through the lens, the shutter speed controls how long that light hits the sensor. The two of them have to be adjusted properly to suit the amount of light hitting the subject. If the lens doesn't admit enough light and/or the shutter is opened for too short an amount of time, not enough light gets to the sensor and you get a black image.

The S mode is for shutter priority. This lets you set the shutter speed and the camera automatically adjusts the lens aperture for correct exposure. However, the lens has a maximum aperture beyond which it cannot open. If the shutter speed is too fast, again not enough light gets through the lens and you get a black image.

Since you didn't specify the model of your Nikon camera, I can't tell you exactly how to adjust the shutter speed and aperture. If you can't find the procedure in your manual, please feel free to reply to this post, specifying the model.

Feb 24, 2011 | Nikon Camera Lenses

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I have a slightly older version of this lens. It worked perfectly with my pentax KX the first time I attached the lens and powered on. I unattached and reattached the lens, and it no longer functions. The...

Okay did you happen to take the lens off without shutting the camera off? If so that's not a good idea. First thing I'd advise is to clean the lens contacts using a new red pencil eraser, lightly polish the gold contacts and clean the surface off with a lens cloth not a tissue. Next I'm not totally sure of the Pentax camera you have but does the camera control both the shutter speed and aperture? If so then the lens needs to be placed in the I'm going to say stopped down position before locking it to the camera, now that might be wrong so if it doesn't work then shut the camera off remove the lens and open the aperture to its wides point reinstall the lens and turn the camera on and try that. Sorry it's been a year since I used a Pentax and I'm going on memory. Another thing some older lenses although they fit the mount and appear to work may not actually work (depending on how old the 28-200 is) Some older technology in third party lenses can't keep up with the "new" cameras. In short the new camera may be able to look back in technology but the lens may not have the "chip" to look forward and the two are not compatible. I'm not saying this is the case here because you said it worked I'm thinking dirty contacts or the aperture ring was not set correctly.

Jan 20, 2011 | Tamron AF 28-200mm f/3.8-5.6 LD Aspherical...

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For use on a non-Hasselblad camera, can I use the aperture preview button (which locks) to set aperture?

There is no communications between the camera and lens. When using a set up like this everything becomes manual and you must remember to stop down the aperture to your taking aperture before releasing the shutter. I don't know what camera or format you are going to use this lens with but assuming it is a digital "bridge" (a camera that is between an amateur and a pro) or a professional the sequence would be the same.
To view, focus and compose the lens would be set in this case F2, to select the correct light meter reading the lens is set (stopped) down to the taking aperture. The modes I've used for this have been mostly manual but lately I found that "AV" worked equally well and the camera metered to the proper exposure. Most times the camera was mounted on a tripod and the shutter was released with a electronic shutter release.
Sequence for taking a photo for me anyway was/is (with the camera mounted on a tripod) focus, compose, stop down to taking aperture, check metering and release the shutter if in AV mode or manual mode to set the shutter speed and release the shutter.
You will find that all makes of digital cameras will function differently so what sequence works for one won't work on others. This meaning I have had digital cameras that wouldn't meter through anything other then the lenses meant specifically for them.
Problems that I've had. Forgetting to stop down to taking aperture (like Duh), not fine focusing (manual), not trusting the in focus indicator, forgetting that the viewfinder is/was only 94% of the scene. Once a little time has been spent with a lens set up like this the rewards are far beyond the trivial annoyances. Have fun with it

Jan 12, 2011 | Hasselblad 110mm f/2 FE Zeiss Plannar Lens

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00 on the F info (aperture shows 00)

I'll assume the lens is an AF lens? Most of the new Canon bodies require AF contacts. If there isn't the right contacts, it won't work. There are suppose to be AF body mounts that will tell the body that there is an AF lens, then use the old lens in Auto mode.
If it's an AF lens, the internal electronics are toast. You could send it out, but they'll charge you a "look at" fee. That could run into many bucks. Give Canon a call.

Jul 26, 2009 | Canon EF-S 17-55 f/2.8 IS USM Lens

1 Answer

Canon EF-S 17-85MM F/4-5.6 IS USM prevents features from working on 40D

something sounds strange about this. aperture 00 is an invalid aperture value. stands to reason if that is the case the camera would complain about it. via error code. being that its only six mos. old i would give canon a ring.

Oct 11, 2008 | Canon EF-S 17-85MM F/4-5.6 IS USM Lens

2 Answers

Lens won't allow me to change aperture & several other functions on camera

The USM engine may be out of order, or there is a bad contact in the lens.

Oct 11, 2008 | Canon EF-S 17-85MM F/4-5.6 IS USM Lens

1 Answer

NIKON 50mm 1.8 ---"Err" on top panel display if aperture setting is not at f1.8

this same thing is happening to me on my D70s.
i posted about it at and everyone is stumped.
i already returned the lens and got a new one...
same problem. i don't know what's wrong.
does anyone here have any insight?

Aug 10, 2008 | Nikon Normal AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D...

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