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I need a manual to my watch

I've a 7006 Bistec Watch , but I don't know how to use him , I'll happy if someone will can to help me Thanks Amit

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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micromaster
  • 3614 Answers

SOURCE: Montres Carlo Watch

okay.. please wait..

what exactly the model# of the watch..

thanks

micro

Posted on Jun 27, 2008

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  • 6 Answers

SOURCE: Help! I need instruction manual for Fossil watch

If you go to www.fossil.com you can find the manuals for most of their watches.

Posted on May 13, 2009

escapement
  • 2334 Answers

SOURCE: I did not recieve an instruction manual with my Nike Imara watch.

Click on my profile (escapement), then click on Tips and Tricks. There you will find link to all TIMEX watch manuals. Rate me, plz.

Posted on Feb 26, 2010

escapement
  • 2334 Answers

SOURCE: I need a replacement strap

Log in to Nike website and click support button. You should be able to ask them how to obtain the part you are after.

Posted on May 18, 2011

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alpug
  • 1961 Answers

SOURCE: I own UL 1168,

Hello!

This is the closes instruction guide that I found on the internet. Hope this helps! You must have adobe acrobat reader installed in your system to view this manual cause its pdf format.

http://www.genevawatchgroup.com/pdf/unlisted/UNLISTED-ANALOG-DIGITAL-INSTRUCTIONS.pdf



you can search for other possible user guide compatible for your model from the link below.
http://www.genevawatchgroup.com/
select customer service..scroll down below for Instruction Manual..

Posted on May 19, 2011

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1 Answer

How much is it worth


Hi! Which watch brand and model do you have? If you want to evaluate an expensive watch, then you should find an expert that will give you a fair valuation. For example, I needed to evaluate my Rolex and there were several websites, which offered such service. I picked the one called Ermitage Jewelers and they've made an evaluation. Then I've sold them my pre-owned watch and bought a new one :) I don't know if such scheme will work for you. Still you must be careful not to became a fraud victim. Hope it'll help. Good luck!

Jan 12, 2016 | Watches

1 Answer

Need an owners manual for this watch


Sorry Andreas, I can't find an online listing for this watch. Are you sure about the make? Because "bistec" just comes up with beefsteak and variations.

Jun 29, 2015 | Watches

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Just purchased a gold ladies 1928 watch. No instruction manual with it. Is it a manual windup or battery operated watch? Need instruction manual or booklet also.


Hello Ted,

Can you please specify the the Brand and Model of the watch? If you don't know it, just specify all the markings you can read from the watch.

Thanks.

I'll be waiting for your reply.

Nov 16, 2011 | Watches

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Hy! I don't know how to fix the time on adidas adp1158. I hope you'll help me. thanks.


You can get instructions from their web site
(www.adidas.com/campaigns/watches_fw07/content/index.asp?)

Click on "instruction manuals" in the menu on the left, choose your country.

You will be presented with a series of generic instructions from which you
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Aug 05, 2011 | Adidas Chronograph #ADP1158 Watch for...

1 Answer

I have a digital watch SHARP made that says SUNDAY when really it is TUESDAY how can i get watch to say the right day?


Take a look at your watch. While models and brands vary, you'll find a few things in common on almost all of them. First, they'll have different modes of operation. A typical digital watch may have modes for time, stopwatch, date, alarm and timer, to name a few. Look on your watch for a button labeled "mode." Press it several times to see what's available. Typically the watch will display the name of each mode as you push the button repeatedly. When you've found the mode you want to adjust, stop there.

  • 2 Look for a button that is labeled "set" or "adjust" on your watch. The location will vary, depending on the brand of watch you own. Press in and hold this button. After a few seconds, the time (or whatever mode) you have selected will begin to flash. In most cases, you'll need to select the item you want to adjust (minutes or hours) by pressing "mode" again. Once the portion you want is flashing, you're ready to adjust it.
  • 3 Press a button to advance the parameter (hours or minutes) that you've selected. This button may or may not be labeled. If it isn't labeled, you'll have to experiment with different buttons. Once you've set the first parameter, change to the second by pressing "mode." Follow the same routine to adjust. To exit, you'll typically press the "set" button.
  • 4 Use resources available to you. There are thousands of digital watch styles on the market, each with slightly different setting methods. When you buy a watch, tuck the manual away in a safe location for reference. If you don't have the manual, do a website search. Most major manufacturers keep their manuals online for easy future reference.
  • Jun 28, 2011 | Watches

    1 Answer

    CANNOT GET BACK OPEN TO REPLACE BATTERY


    The back of your watch is attached in one of two ways. Look at the watch back. If it's smooth all around the circumference of the back, you have a snap-fit back. If, however, you see little notches cut into the edges--if they were extended, it would make the back look like a pizza that's been cut into slices--then you have a back that screws on and off. Pictures I've seen of your specific watch suggest to me that you have a snap-fit case back, though I'll include instructions about a screw-on back, just in case I'm wrong.

    A snap-fit case back often has a small (very small) raised section at one spot of the rim; this is so you can insert a tool called a case knife and pop the back off. If you don't see that small raised section, you'll need to wiggle the blade of your case knife under the edge and gently apply leverage from there--it's usually easiest by one of the watch lugs, as opposed to near the watch crown. If you don't have a case knife, you can often use a thin (but tough!) knife blade to do the same thing. Remember, though, that applying this much force through a knife blade can distort or take a chunk out of your edge, so be prepared to sacrifice a knife or be prepared to re-sharpen it after this exercise. A screwdriver does not work very well; the blades are typically too narrow to provide good leverage without distorting the case back, and they may even gouge into the watch body. Avoid using them for this purpose. To increase the water resistance of watches, modern snap-fit case backs are often very tightly fitted--they're tough to get off, and even tougher to push back into position. I would not be surprised if you would need a jeweler's press to get the back of this watch back into position.

    If, on the other hand, you have a case back with notches in it, you will need to unscrew the back of the watch. You'll need a special wrench to do this. There are lots of makers and models from a basic $5 "watch crab" to a $100 workbench-mounted device that works on all kinds of watches, including Rolexes. Again, because screw backs are usually tightly fastened to increase water resistance, simply using a pair of needle-nose pliers in the ridges probably won't work. Nor will using a screwdriver in one notch--these backs are designed to move when equal pressure is applied around the edges, and applying force in one area only locks things up. Under no circumstances try to pry off the back if you have a screw back -- this will damage the threads, and you'll probably never be able to get the watch back together again.

    You can find case knives and case wrenches at many jewelry supply stores, mail order supply houses like Otto Frei (http://www.ottofrei.com/store/home.php?cat=296 will take you right to the watch repair tools), and on eBay. However, if you're near a Harbor Freight store, they sell a "watch battery changing kit" and jeweler's press for a pretty reasonable price. These aren't the ultra-high quality tools that a professional jeweler would use, but they'll be perfectly fine for changing the occasional battery for many years. I've probably closed 100+ watches using the inexpensive press I got from there.

    If you can't close the watch case with your bare hands and don't have access to a case press, your safest bet may be to go to a jewelry store or jewelry counter in a department store and ask if they could close the back for you with the proper tool. You may have to tip them a few dollars, but that is still far cheaper than the cost of replacing a broken watch crystal.

    May 29, 2011 | Watches

    1 Answer

    How to open


    The back of your watch is attached in one of two ways. Look at the watch back. If it's smooth all around the circumference of the back, you have a snap-fit back. If, however, you see little notches cut into the edges--if they were extended, it would make the back look like a pizza that's been cut into slices--then you have a back that screws on and off. Pictures I've seen of your specific watch suggest to me that you have a snap-fit case back, though I'll include instructions about a screw-on back just in case I'm wrong.

    A snap-fit case back often has a small (very small) raised section at one spot of the rim; this is so you can insert a tool called a case knife and pop the back off. If you don't see that small raised section, you'll need to wiggle the blade of your case knife under the edge and gently apply leverage from there--it's usually easiest by one of the watch lugs, as opposed to near the watch crown. If you don't have a case knife, you can often use a thin (but tough!) knife blade to do the same thing. Remember, though, that applying this much force through a knife blade can distort or take a chunk out of your edge, so be prepared to sacrifice a knife or be prepared to re-sharpen it after this exercise. A screwdriver does not work very well; the blades are typically too narrow to provide good leverage without distorting the case back, and they may even cutt a gouge into the watch body. Avoid using them for this purpose. To increase the water resistance of watches, modern snap-fit case backs are often very tightly fitted--they can be tough to get off, but they're even tougher to push back into position. I would not be surprised if you would need a jeweler's press to get the back of this watch back into position.

    If, on the other hand, you have a case back with notches in it, you will need to unscrew the back of the watch. You'll need a special wrench to do this. There are lots of makers and models from a basic $5 "watch crab" to a $100 workbench-mounted device that works on all kinds of watches, including Rolexes. Again, because screw backs are usually tightly fastened to increase water resistance, simply using a pair of needle-nose pliers in the ridges probably won't work. Nor will using a screwdriver in one notch--these backs are designed to move when equal pressure is applied around the edges, and applying force in one area only locks things up. Under no circumstances try to pry off the back if you have a screw back -- this will damage the threads, and you'll probably never be able to get the watch back together again.

    You can find case knives and case wrenches at many jewelry supply stores, mail order supply houses like Otto Frei (http://www.ottofrei.com/store/home.php?cat=296 will take you right to the watch repair tools), and on eBay. However, if you're near a Harbor Freight store, they sell a "watch battery changing kit" and jeweler's press for an extremely reasonable price. These aren't the ultra-high quality tools that a professional jeweler would use, but they'll be perfectly fine for changing the occasional battery for many years. I've probably closed 100+ watches using the inexpensive press I got from there.

    May 29, 2011 | Peugeot 194M Wrist Watch

    1 Answer

    I have a ZR11622 I can't get the back off to replace the battery!


    The back of your watch is attached in one of two ways. Look at the watch back. If it's smooth all around the circumference of the back, you have a snap-fit back. If, however, you see little notches cut into the edges--if they were extended, it would make the back look like a pizza that's been cut into slices--then you have a back that screws on and off.

    A snap-fit case back often has a small (very small) raised section at one spot of the rim; this is so you can insert a tool called a case knife and pop the back off. If you don't see that small raised section, you'll need to wiggle the blade of your case knife under the edge and gently apply leverage from there--it's usually easiest by one of the watch lugs, as opposed to near the watch crown. If you don't have a case knife, you can often use a thin (but tough!) knife blade to do the same thing. Remember, though, that applying this much force through a knife blade can distort or take a chunk out of your edge, so be prepared to sacrifice a knife or be prepared to re-sharpen it after this exercise. A screwdriver does not work very well; the blades are typically too narrow to provide good leverage without distorting the case back, and they may even cutt a gouge into the watch body. Avoid using them for this purpose. To increase the water resistance of watches, Relic case backs are often very tightly fitted--they're tough to get off, and even tougher to push back into position. I would not be surprised if you would need a jeweler's press to get the back of this watch back into position.

    If, on the other hand, you have a case back with notches in it, you will need to unscrew the back of the watch. You'll need a special wrench to do this. There are lots of makers and models from a basic $5 "watch crab" to a $100 workbench-mounted device that works on all kinds of watches, including Rolexes. Again, because screw backs are usually tightly fastened to increase water resistance, simply using a pair of needle-nose pliers in the ridges probably won't work. Nor will using a screwdriver in one notch--these backs are designed to move when equal pressure is applied around the edges, and applying force in one area only locks things up. Under no circumstances try to pry off the back if you have a screw back -- this will damage the threads, and you'll probably never be able to get the watch back together again.

    You can find case knives and case wrenches at many jewelry supply stores, mail order supply houses like Otto Frei (http://www.ottofrei.com/store/home.php?cat=296 will take you right to the watch repair tools), and on eBay. However, if you're near a Harbor Freight store, they sell a "watch battery changing kit" and jeweler's press for an extremely reasonable price. These aren't the ultra-high quality tools that a professional jeweler would use, but they'll be perfectly fine for changing the occasional battery for many years. I've probably closed 100+ watches using the inexpensive press I got from there.

    May 26, 2011 | Relic Watches

    2 Answers

    What type of battery does the Fossil Ch2473 use? I called Fossil and they could not help me, instead they insisted I pay them $15 to replace the battery and wait 2-4 weeks for shipping. However, I...


    The vast majority of Fossil analog wristwatches take either a #377 or #379 watch battery. The #379, being slightly smaller, is somewhat more commonly found in women's watches than in men's watches, but I have seen both types used in men's and women's watches alike. However, the Fossil CH2473 includes chronograph functions, which means that you can have multiple motors inside the watch running simultaneously. As a result, it's possible that this watch will require a different / bigger bigger. However, if it's not one of these batteries, or even if it takes a 3-volt lithium battery instead of a 1.5 volt watch battery, it will still be something pretty mundane.

    In general, common batteries like the type I expect you'll find inside your watch are commonly found at many drug stores, jewelry store counters at places like Walmart and Target, and even at some dollar stores. Be aware that cheap dollar store batteries are usually alkaline, not silver oxide, versions of the same size battery. Alkaline batteries may work perfectly well in many watches, but they have a somewhat different energy performance curve over time, and, in general, they won't last quite as long as a comparable silver oxide battery. In addition, for reasons I've never been able to figure out, some of the Fossil watches that I've serviced would not function with an alkaline battery--but would work fine when I put in a silver oxide battery of the same size and voltage. I have not been able to see a pattern to predict when this will and will not occur. Lithium batteries, whether "brand name" or generic, should have the same performance curve.

    If you do open up your watch to change the battery and don't recognize the battery type/code on your battery, don't give up. Watch batteries have different numbering schemes, depending on the manufacturer. Here's a link to a cross-reference chart that will help you "translate" one code into another. I would suggest starting by looking at the #377 line to see if one of those cross-reference codes matches what you have. However, you may need to look around the chart to get an exact match:

    http://www.watchbatteries.com/custom.aspx,,id,,75

    As a final thought, the backs of some Fossil watches are very snugly fitted to their cases. You can generally get them off without too much of a problem, but there's a good chance you may need a jeweler's press to get them to snap back on properly. I've noticed this most with round watch backs; I generally haven't needed a press to close oblong or tonneau-shaped Fossil watches (or some round watches, too). A jeweler's press spreads the pressure evenly around the edges of the watch back and watch case, preventing damaging pressure on the watch crystal, watch movement, and watch back. Clamping the watch in a regular vise to try to press on the back runs a high risk of damaging your watch, and I do not recommend trying that, no matter how frustrated you get. It's much safer (and cheaper, overall) to tip someone with a vise a couple of dollars to close up your watch for you.

    May 15, 2011 | Fossil CH2473 Watch for Men

    1 Answer

    THERE WAS NO MANUAL WITH THIS WATCH OBTAINED FROM WALMART ON 5-7-2011. THE WATCH IS A CASIO DB36-1AV. WOULD YOU MAIL ONE TO: ALLEN BOYD, 1206 INGLESIDE AVE., ATHENS, TN 37303?


    Allen,

    This may be the manual you're looking for....please click on the link below to see if it's similar to your watch. You'll need to have Adobe Acrobat reader installed on your system to view the manual. If you don't, then you can download a free copy at http://get.adobe.com/reader/?promoid=BUIGO.

    http://ftp.casio.co.jp/pub/world_manual/wat/en/qw2515.pdf

    You may also want to check out this link:
    http://world.casio.com/wat/download/en/manual/

    I hope this helps. Enjoy your watch!

    --Sandy

    May 09, 2011 | Watches

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