Question about Pentax *ist DS Digital Camera

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Exposure Everything I shoot is 3 stops overexposed. I've been through all the menus looking for something to address this and haven't found it yet. Going to manual exposure is the only way I've been able to take pictures it so far. Thank god for the old F-16 and 125 in direct sun rule.

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Re: Exposure

NO NO NO, there are the custom settings on this camera that will allow you to set your +/- exposure, go through the manule and make sure all the settings are zeroed out, start fresh, set up a user setting for your style of shooting and ENJOY SHOOTING! These cameras are great for the price and quality of photos they shoot.

Posted on Oct 07, 2009

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Re: Exposure

I think this is one for the Tech Support on the Pentax web site - Mean while you could try aiming a bit higher in the composition then half pressing the release to hold the setting thus forcing a stop down.

Posted on May 23, 2007

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Shoot pictures of the moon best setting for that

Hi. I would recommend first you use a tripod or some stable support, second the best settings would be Aperture priority and use something in the region of f56-f8 or Manual and set f5.6-f8 and use the exposure indicator to adjust the shutter speed, use the spot meter function on the camera if you have it and vary the exposure by shooting at the recommended exposure and also by shooting overexposed and underexposed. Trial and error is really the only way to go.Set the ISO to 100 or 200 to get the best resolution as you will probably have to zoom it up to 200% on your computer screen to have a good image.

Apr 15, 2014 | Canon PowerShot SD1200 IS / Digital IXUS...

4 Answers

Dark Pictures

try reseting the camera back to default settings, there should be a function for that in the menus or a small reset hole somewhere in the camera.

Jul 23, 2008 | Canon PowerShot A640 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Incorrect exposure on NIkon D700

It sounds like you've got exposure bracketing turned on.
Refer to the "Bracketing" subsection of the "Exposure" section of the manual (page 130 in my copy). If you need a manual, you may download a copy here.

Apr 06, 2012 | Nikon D700 Digital Camera

1 Answer


Hi Andrew - look for a "exposure compensation" control on your camera. It may be buried in a menu; or an easily operated dedicated button on the camera body itself. You didn't include the model camera you have - so I couldn't look it up. Try googling: "exposure compensation model" where model is the model number of your camera.

Good luck!

Nov 28, 2011 | Canon Eos Digital Cameras

1 Answer

I am shooting with a Nioon D200 and I have to shoot at 100 iso and 1.8 in the shade in the daytime.If I go over 200 all I have it dark pics no matter my f-stop.Is this a camera malfunction.( my friend...

If you're shooting: ISO 100, f1.4 @ 1/1000 second, it is the same as:
ISO 200, f1.4 @ 1/2000 second, or
ISO 400, f1.4 @ 1/4000 second, etc.. Because each time you double the ISO value, you need 1/2 the light for a proper exposure. The ISO is the camera sensor (or film) "sensitivity to light". The higher the ISO, the more sensitive it is. That's why in the examples above, the shutter is opened 1/2 as long (or it is twice as fast - whichever you like to look at it). But it doesn't stop there..

That same ISO 100, f1.4 @ 1/1000 second picture is also the same as:
ISO 100, f2.0 @ 1/2000 second, or
ISO 100, f2.8 @ 1/1000 second, or
ISO 100, f4.0 @ 1/500 second, etc.. This is because each FULL f-stop (1.4, 2.0, 2.8, 4.0, 5.6, 8.0, 11, 16, 22 and 32) each allow TWICE as much light than the previous (higher f-stop number). f1.4 allows 2x more light than 2.0, which allows 2x more than 2.8 which allows 2x more than 4.0, and so on. So, if you get twice the light from one aperture than the previous full f-stop, and the ISO is the same, then the length of time the shutter is open must be reduced by 1/2. Hence, 1/500 is half as long as 1/1000, which is half as long as /12000, etc.

It can be represented like the exposure triangle below:
All this shows is that all three variables control the exposure. If your main objective is to change the Depth of Field (DoF), adjust Aperture and one or more of the others to get a properly exposed picture. Likewise, if you want to suggest or stop motion, you'd adjust shutter speed first - faster to stop the motion or slower to suggest motion by creating blur. ISO introduces grain to the image. The lower the the ISO value, the finer the grain is (may not even be perceptible). The smoothest color gradients come from the lowest ISO values - but they need to most light. A tripod may be needed unless shooting in direct sunlight or other brightly lit subject. ISO is a lifesaver for poorly lit subjects, night time photography, or other indoor shooting without a tripod or speedlight. The ability to shoot good looking pictures at ISO 3200 means that you need only 1/32 of the light needed when shooting at ISO 100. That means that under the right circumstances, you could hand hold the camera at ISO 3200 when the same picture taken at ISO 100 would take 32x longer. Of course, grain comes into the mix here. It may be too grainy for your likes. Experiment to how high you can set your ISO with acceptable results.

Below is a chart of the full shutter speeds, stops and ISO values. Many cameras break these down further into 1/3 steps for even more minute control. Basically, if you change the value of either shutter speed, f-stop or ISO values 1, 2, 3, 6, 9 - or however many steps - you need to adjust one or both of the others an equivalent amount to compensate to get a properly exposed picture.


Lastly, make sure you haven't set exposure compensation to a negative value. Press and hold the the "+/-" button (has a green dot) on the top panel next to the shutter release button. Spin the rear thumb dial so that it is niether plus or minus. Minus makes the picture dark (underexposed) and Plus makes it brighter (overexposed).

I hope this was helpful and good luck! Please rate my reply - thanks!

Oct 12, 2011 | Nikon D200 Body Only Digital Camera

1 Answer

When I take a picture,then look at the LCD screen,all the white areas flash black then white. If I download the pictures everything is fine. Is something set wrong? Also for no reason the flash stopped...

The blinking indicates blown-out highlights. Those are the areas of your pictures that have been overexposed into pure white. This is generally considered a bad thing, and the correct fix in most cases is to reduce the exposure to bring back details. Losing details in the shadows is generally more acceptable. But this is just a warning: the camera doesn't know what effect you're trying for.

While viewing a picture, pressing up/down on the multiselector cycles through the different available views of the picture.

Aug 30, 2010 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

1 Answer

Overexposed, display is stuck

Just checking. Have you checked the exposure compensation. I apolagise if this is too obvious.

Regards, Tim H

Jan 01, 2009 | Canon Rebel XT / EOS 350D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Background is overexposed

So, the problem doesn't seem to be the flash if the actual subject in the foreground is exposed properly. My guess is that the background is being lit by another light source. Typically, your camera uses a flash for dark areas or what it gauges as a dark area. This doesn't adjust the background for additional light sources. For example, if you're standing outside and there's a tree covering someone that you're taking a picture of your flash will adjust to "properly" light that individual. However, because the flash was used for the main subject, the background is actually now overexposed. The overexposed background will show up as a brightly lit area because the camera had to adjust for the foreground. This will actually reverse itself when it's dark out - meaning if the background and foreground are dark, the flash will expose the foreground, but the background will be black. Hopefully, that helps you understand lighting and exposure. Now, to fix this problem when shooting, you would need to consider several options - 1. SLR camera with aperture and f-stop settings as well as compensation controls. This will allow you to control every element of the exposure, but you still need to be aware of the lighting behind the "subject" to properly expose your shots. 2. backlighting compensation - common settings on both SLR and point and shoot cameras that makes auto lighting conversions for backlighting and other common lighting issues. Test whatever options are on your camera to see what works best for your specific problem. 3. Photoshop retouching - you may take one shot with your subject exposed properly and a second shot with the background then merge the images together. 4. using a tripod to shoot without using the flash - this may give you the closest exposure to exactly what you see when looking at your subject.

Dec 19, 2008 | Polaroid i733LP Digital Camera

1 Answer

Bright white exposure

This may be a ccd problem.
See this link.

Aug 06, 2008 | Canon PowerShot A80 Digital Camera

1 Answer

750z exposure compensation problem

This is normal for the 750z.. a friend of mine has the same problem. If you try to print straight from the camera, everything is too bright. My friend has to manually lower the brighness and raise the contrast on every picture.

Sep 08, 2005 | Pentax Optio 750Z Digital Camera

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