Question about Sony VAIO Digital Studio PCV-RX670 PC Desktop

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Processor upgrade I am wanting to upgrade my P4 1.8 to a P4 2.6 will this work? The buss speeds are both the same 400Mhz but the cache is different. the 2.6 is a 478 pin PPGA FC-PGA2 not sure the exact numbers on the 1.8 other than its also a 478 pin

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Re: Processor upgrade

Not a realistic proposition. So many other parts of the Mother board are 'tuned' the a specific processor Big Name manufacturer- like Sony/Dell etc., tend to design custom MoBos and processors as an integrated unit so the -upgrades are limited to memory or PCI cards etc.

Posted on May 21, 2007

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Processor supporting for SIS M661MX


"In notebook PC live demo area, SiS will showcase numerous notebook PC using Intel Pentium M platform embedded with SiS M661MX. Notebook PC made by Acer, Asus, Clevo, Hitachi, Lenovo, and ECS will be on display."

Here we have learned the motherboard chipset will support the Intel Pentium M platform.

All use the Socket 479 processor socket,

All have 400MegaHertz Front Side Bus support. (400MHz FSB)

-> Voltage Range DOES change, though.

Intel Celeron M?

If you move from a Pentium based Celeron M, to a Pentium M, you are upgrading; with this alone.


Because a comparable Pentium M, has twice the amount of L2 cache, that a Celeron M does.

The L1 cache is hardly ever mentioned.

Processor cache:

1) It is the FIRST memory area the CPU (Processor) accesses.
This is because the L2 cache operates at the same frequency rate, that the CPU does. (Excuse me, 'Speed')

2) It is a small memory area for the Processor (CPU)
(The Ram Memory is next, followed by the Harddrive )

Crude example;
You are writing a paper for college. You need some additional information. Where is it?

Down in the basement in a box of books, last book on the bottom, and the box is under the stairs.
There is NO basement light.

Down you go flashlight in hand. Dig THE book out you need, and head back upstairs. Open the book, and find the page/s you need.

What? Need some more information? Yep. Back down in the basement, flashlight in hand.

You press a few keys on the Keyboard, for the computer you are using, and have your info in seconds.

Less cache = Basement scenario
More cache = Computer scenario

Moving from a CPU that operates at a 1.5GigaHertz frequency rate, ('Speed'), to a Processor that operates at a 1.7GHz 'speed'.

Will you notice it? HARDLY.

In fact I'll go as far as to say NO.

1.5GHz to 2.0GHz? OK. Now you're talking.

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Feb 16, 2013 | PC Desktops

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I have an el1333g desktop it has a amd 64x2 2.4 prosscer in how much bigger can i go

Select the "Start Menu." Click to select "Control Panel." This will open a new window with several clickable options. Choose "System and Maintenance," typically located near the top left-hand corner of the Control Panel Click to select "System" from the new list of options Look for the CPU's stock speed as indicated under the "Processor" heading. This is a ballpark, relatively close estimate of your computer's CPU speed, as provided by the manufacturer. Checking the Stock CPU Speed in Windows XP Click the "Start Menu. Right-click on "My Computer." Select "Properties." By default the Properties window will usually be set to the "General" tab, but if the window is set to a different tab you'll need to click on the "General" tab located near the top of the window. Check the CPU rating as listed underneath the "Computer" heading. b> Determining Real-Time CPU Speed Go to CPU Speed Professional's website (see Below) and download "CPU Speed Professional." While other free CPU clocks exist, many are beta programs with glitches and unwanted bugs. CPU Speed Professional is well-known and reputable, receiving the "Vista 5 Star Software Award" according to its website. Install the recently downloaded " " file by double-clicking on it and following on-screen prompts to complete the automated install procedure. Open CPU Speed Professional. Click "Test Your Speed" on the main program interface. A real-time, active measurement of your CPU speed will appear numerically, and CPU Speed Professional will also display your CPU speed on a stylish meter for easy visual comprehension. Get a Faster Processor b> Start by visiting (see the Below ) to research and figure out which processor you want. Read the page and click on the links to the different processor families. Once inside the processor families you can look at the specifications and speeds of the processors. There are three main ways of determining the speed of a processor. First is the speed, measured in GHz. The higher the speed (example: 2.4 GHz) the faster the processor. Second is the L2 cache, measured in MB (example: 2 MB L2 Cache). The L2 cache is kind of like the CPU's own RAM; the larger the cache, the faster your computer operation will be. Finally, there is the Front Side Bus (FSB) speed. The FSB speed is the speed that bits of data are fed through the processor. FSB is measured in MHz (example: 1066 MHz FSB). Once you have an idea of the processor you want, continue to step two. Ensure that your processor of choice will be compatible with your current system. You can do this by checking the documentation for your motherboard. Look through the manual to find out what its CPU socket type is (example: LGA775). There can and will be different socket types on CPUs so ensure your processor choices match up with your motherboard before continuing. The socket (or package) type will be listed in the specifications of any processor you look at. Worth noting is that some motherboards also impose a limit for how high the FSB of a processor can be. While a higher FSB processor will still work with a lower FSB motherboard, processors have to go by the speed limit imposed by the motherboard. Keeping this in mind, as long as the socket type is the same on both parts, they will be compatible. Visit (see Below) or a similar computer or electronics store of your choice and nose around the processor section of the site. You should be able to find the processor model you are after. Decide on a processor. If you've already done the research suggested in steps one and two, you should have a decent idea of the kind you want. Choose among the models you selected and add it to your cart, ensuring that the socket type of your new processor will match your motherboard. Once purchased, you should receive it within a few days.

Hope this helps.

Jan 21, 2013 | eMachines EL1333G03w (884483010820) PC...

2 Answers

My current data bus speed is 400Mhz I want to upgrade my memory, Can memory of speed 533Mhz work. What changes will I have to make?

It May work but the bus speed is going to stay the same if it is max clcoked at 400 MHZ thats it no faster unless your computer can be jumpered to a higher speed but most you are limited by the clcok speed of the buss.

Mar 26, 2010 | Compaq Evo D510 Minitower (Open Box)...

1 Answer

Yea i need to purchase a new processor chip the motherboard is a 754 socket my pc takes a 3100+ amd sempron processor my pc is 1.8ghz im just not sure what to buy some say they are 64 bit and this one is...

please purchase the processor that is compatible to your motherboard. if the motherboard can be upgrade to a higher speed of processor then purchase it. if not, stick to the required specs. if you still want to upgrade, replace the motherboard, processor and the memory.

Mar 23, 2010 | PC Desktops

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I have intel pentium celeron 1.70ghz 256mb ddr ram, i wana upgrade it to P4, i got 8284g motherboard

8284G tells me nothing unless I want to hazard a guess, and I don't.
I like to post factual information.

8284G could be a pre-built computer manufacturer number on a label, that is stuck upon the motherboard manufacturer's printed model number, on the motherboard.

All pre-built computers have their motherboards made by a motherboard manufacturer, they do not make their own.

Or it could be a printed model number on the motherboard, but refers to the pre-built computer manufacturer model number, that they wanted printed on. Printed on for them by the motherboard manufacturer.

It could be a reference to a part number on a chip of the motherboard. An Intel 8284g which is a graphics controller chip. (Chip and chipset are slang terms for Integrated Circuit, or IC)

However though, the Intel 8284G graphics controller chipset is usually used in conjunction with the Intel i845 chipset family.
(845, 845E, 845GL, 845G, 845GE, 845PE, and 845GV)

The Intel i845 chipset family supports Intel processors that have up to a 400MegaHertz Front Side Bus. (400MHz FSB), and some of the Intel i845 chipsets will support processors with up to a 533MHz FSB.

So now let's look at the Intel Celeron 1.7GHz processor,

1) Based on the Willamette-128 Core
2) Based upon the 180Nanometer architecture. (180nm)
3) Uses a 400MHz FSB
4) Uses 1.7 Volts (DC)
5) Uses the Socket 478 processor socket. (Processor has 478 pins, processor socket has 478 socket holes)

Based upon the processor information, and processor information only, you could use an Intel Pentium 4 that has a maximum frequency rate of 2.0GHz, and uses a Socket 478 processor socket.
I also believe it should be based upon the Willamette Core. Reasoning is that the Willamette Core Intel Pentium 4 processors, use 1.75 volts.

The next generation of Intel Pentium 4's are based upon the Northwood Core, and the 130nm architecture.
They use 1.475 to 1.525 Volts.

I don't know if you would install one of these Intel Pentium 4 processors, and your BIOS would automatically recognize it, and set the voltage to match. If not, the processor would burn up due to too much voltage.

What would you gain if you installed a Pentium 4 2.0GHz processor?

Intel Pentium 4's have twice the cache that a comparable Celeron does.

Cache. Crude explanation:

You are writing a thesis, and you need more information. The information is located in books, which are in the basement in a box, and there is no light in the basement.

Down you go with a flashlight in hand, locate the box, and look through the books until you find the book you need.
Back upstairs you open the book, and find the page/s you need for your information.

You find that not all the information you need is located in that book, and back downstairs in the basement you go, flashlight in hand.

OR, you press a few keys on your keyboard, of the computer in front of you, and have your information is seconds.

Low cache is the basement scenario.
Large cache is the computer scenario.

The processor cache is a small memory area for the processor. It operates at the same frequency rate as the processor, therefore it is the fastest memory area available for the processor. It is also the first memory area the processor 'sees'.

Ram memory is next, followed by the harddrive. The harddrive is slower due to it being a mechanical device. (SSD or Solid State harddrives are faster than the mechanical IDE and SATA harddrives. Still not as fast as Ram Memory though)

The .3GHz increase, and the cache increase will be a slightly noticeable difference.
Enough to "Write home to mom about?"
Nope. Not IMHO.

You probably won't notice any increase when on the internet, or doing school/business work.
You differently won't notice any real increase when gaming.

To summarize:
The amount spent, and the time looking, for an Intel Pentium 4 processor that is 2.0GHz, and based upon the Willamette Core, just won't be worth your trouble.
Unless someone just gives you one.

Mar 22, 2010 | Intel Celeron -D 2.26Ghz Computer System...

2 Answers

How do i change the memory bus speed on my dell optiplex 170l? The CPU is an Intel Celeron 2.4GHz. The mother board processor speed is 400MHz and the Bios indicates a memory bus speed of 266MHz and does...

You checked in the right place as far as looking in the BIOS, however, memory and CPU sockets do not necessarily have the same buss speed. My FSB runs at 1066Mhz and my RAM at 800Mhz, it all depends on what type of RAM you buy as to the bus speed. You can up the bus speed on your RAM if you wish to reduce bottle-necking, but I've only done that a few times. In order to adjust anything, you must set the settings to manual. Be careful when you change this stuff around though, voltages must also be adjusted accordingly.

Feb 28, 2010 | Dell OptiPlex 170L PC Desktop

1 Answer

Best processor for a dell optiplex gx260

whats the current processor installed? it can possible handle P4 procs up to 2.0 to 2.4Ghz..

Feb 14, 2010 | Dell OptiPlex GX260 PC Desktop

1 Answer

Will an Intel E7400 processor work with an MSI P965 Neo F V2?

Your processor "Intel E7400" is listed as a socket 775 Intell core 2 duo processor. Your motherboard "MSI P965 Neo F V2" is listed as an Intell board using a socket 775 processor socket. The front side buss (or fsb) speed capabilities of the mother board, and the buss speed of the processor are compatible They should play nice with each other.

Good Luck!

Jul 27, 2009 | Intel PC Desktops

2 Answers


3.2GHz Intel Xeon processor with 2MB of Level 3 cache

2.8GHz Intel Xeon processors with1MB of Level 3 cache offers a significant performance increase over the 3.06GHz/512MB processor

I assume the higher # is the faster board

Nov 14, 2008 | HP PC Desktops

2 Answers

Emachine T4150 CPU upgrade

Your processor is a Pentium 4 processor that uses there are 3 different type of sockets for Pentium processors. Socket 423, socket 478, and the latest one is socket 775.
Based on the information here:

Your MoBo has a Socket 478 and since it only support 400MHz bus, then your maximum upgrade is 2.0MHz, because all other devices faster than that, need higher bus speed that your Mother Board does not support.

Hope you find the answer useful.

Best regards,

Jan 14, 2008 | PC Desktops

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