Question about Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-T1 Digital Camera

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Images too dark or too bright

My camera has worked great for years and suddenly all the pictures i take outside during the day are too bright and inside or outside at night are too dark. i have read the manual and tried to change the settings and nothing, i have even reset the camera and it still has the problem. please help.

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Re: images too dark or too bright

Metering has gone on the .Can you set the camera to Aperture priority or speed priority?Set to either permanently if you cane then you should get a standard exposure. The inside shots may appear dark, but all the information is there and a treak in an image editor will brighten them up. Cant do the same for too bright images though if they burnout then that's it. a repair is not likely got a birthday any time soon Got some one that luvs you enough to buy you the next one.?

Posted on May 22, 2007

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My Z1275 has developed intermittent horizontal lines on the view screen when the camera is moved, and on images some times. Get good images if I use tripod and shutter delay. Looks like loose connecti

When having bright lights on a dark background, you can have horizontal lines. That is supposed to be normal. but the camera should give good pictures in bright light. Try setting the camera in automatic. most of the time it is the green camera loge on the mail dial.

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6 Ways To Fix Too Bright and Too Dark Photos

Recompose The Photo This is probably the simplest solution. When taking a photo of a scene with very bright and very dark parts, move your camera to eliminate one of the extremes. In the case of the band, I would have either closed the curtains for the shot, or recomposed completely and photographed from the window looking at the band, and the crowd behind.
Use Exposure Lock If you can't recompose the photograph, instead tell the camera what part of the image you would like to see. The rest of the photo will be either over or under exposed (too bright or too dark) but at least you will see your subject. You can dothis by placing the center of the image at your subject; half depressing the shutter to lock the focus and exposure; move the camera to re-compose the image; and fully depressing the shutter.
In the band image, the camera chose to correctly expose the scene outside, but even if the band member had been correctly exposed, the window would have ended up being over exposed and you would just have seen white.
Some cameras have an option called 'spot metering' to set the part of the image you'd like to be correctly exposed. If your camera has this setting, enable it before using the technique above.
Use Fill In Flash If your scene has a sunny background, but your subject is in the shade (or has a hat on), turn on the flash (as I explained way back in tip number 9 - Using Flash During The Day). I know it seems wrong but it really does work! By using the flash, your subject will look as bright as the background. This would have worked well for the child shot above.
High Dynamic Range Imaging This technique is not for the faintof hearted. It requires a subject that does not move; a good camera with the capability to set the exposure and output RAW images. A tripod and image editing software like Photoshop CS3 are also needed.
High Dynamic Range Imaging (or HDR for short) is a technique for placing both very dark and very light areas in the same photo. It requires you to take a number of photographs of thesame scene - each with a different exposure. First take the shot using the camera's recommended settings. Then, in manual mode and keeping the aperture at the same value as the first shot, take a sequence of shots - each shot having a different shutter speed (above and below the original). You'll have 5-9 shots of the same scene all in different exposures.
Merging the three images to the left creates the HDR image below. Thanks to Photomatix for the images.
hdrmerged.jpgNow import these into your favorite paint program. I use Photoshop, but you can as easily use a cheaper program designed specifically for HDR photos like Photomatix. Follow the HDR directions and the paint program will merge these images into one great looking shot!
Use a Filter If your scene is of a brightsky and a dark ground (for instance at sunset, or on a cloudy day), you can use a graduated neutral density filter. This filter cuts out someof the light from one part of the photo (the sky). This will correctly expose the ground and the sky without needing to use HDR. These filterscan be complex to setup, so I don't usually recommend them for beginners.
Fix The Original Photo in an Image Editing Program twobright2.jpgFinally, if you can't take another shot at the same location, you can fix the original image by changing the levels using a paint program. This works best when your subject is darker than the rest of the photo (because cameras lose detail in over-bright areas). I've brightened the band member in the top image using this technique and while it looks okay in thissmall shot, this technique can tend to amplify any noise in the image. The darker the subject, the harder time you will have fixing the image.
I discuss exactly how to use this technique in lesson 2 of my free Image Editing Secrets course. I have a tutorial for Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, Paint Shop Pro and the free Google Picassa.
- See more at:

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Backlight spoilt for dsc t90

When the display is to dark or to light, the manual says:
Adjust the brightness of the backlight (page 18).
On page 18 it says:
This sets the brightness of the LCD screen. When viewing images in bright outside light if [Brightness] is set to [Normal], reset to [Bright]. However, the battery power may decrease faster under such condition.
You also can press the button with the > logo, to change between view pictures and record.

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To autofocus the sensor needs a fair amount of contrast (light and dark eges) to operate. If you're trying to take a photo in a dim room of a dark colored subject for instance the focus won't lock and the camera won't take the picture. Try switching your lens to manual focus and shoot that way.

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The black images with flash mean that the Iris mechanism in the lens is not working properly, and that needs a professional camera repair service.

Best regards,

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Digital camera woes

Hey libra2,
I would try resetting the camera to its default factory settings. Directions on how to do this are on page 20 of your camera manual, and I have included a link to a PDF download of your camera manual in case you need it. I hope this helps!

Go Ahead. Use Us.

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1 Answer

CANON Rebel RTI Outdoor pictures are dark

learning to use light metering correctly can have its challenge.
the manual will guide you on how to set up to read light from the subject. spot metering a dark area will cause general overexposure, or a washed out look. spot metering a bright area will cause a dark image. if you are on spot meter and shoot two people standing together against a bright lit background, your meter will see between them if they are centered, and read all that bright background, setting the camera to a less sensitive combination of aperture / shutter speed, resulting in a dark image. use field averaging meter setting and be sure you are metering the subject and not the background. try shooting a wall that is fairly clear of other colors and uniform it light hitting it, you should have a correctly exposed image. since it works in other modes (at least 1, anyway) then it is unlikely you have an exposure compensation issue. that is the only other non defect issue that would cause your problem.
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