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Brushes spark a lot and big sparks come out of the brushes and commutator when running at high speed but not at low speed

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  • quetranpa Nov 04, 2012

    I'm wondering if the motor is going to eat the carbon brushes like in an hour or so if used like this

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2 Answers

Rival slicer model #65301, sparks when I slice meat, need a new motor ?


possibly not as sparks can be from low brush length or the armature needs a clean up
all brushed motors spark when they run and normally it is a small blue spark the full length of the brush and contained under the brush
If it is a harsh arc like spark then the motor should be looked at by an appliance repair shop

Oct 05, 2015 | Kitchen Appliances - Others

2 Answers

When I run my Makita Impact wrench one of my brushes spark what is the problem


One can expect a small amount of arcing from a carbon brush. If one brush is arcing more than another, or if the arcing is following around the diameter of the commutator toward the other brush, the brushes need to be replaced and commutator cleaned with a commutator stone.

Apr 11, 2014 | Makita 6906 9 Amp 34Inch Impact Wrench

2 Answers

Dewalt DW718 Sparks When cutting . just bought it


The people from Lowes were right.
There are two types of motor designs: Induction motors and brush-type motors.
All electric motors that have brushes make sparks where the brushes contact the rotating commutator. They also run less efficiently but they are a bit smaller than induction motors for equal power output. Brushed motors can also deliver greater power at initial startup.
Because the sparks in brushed motors create heat, the housing around the motors typically have ventilation slots for air to go through to keep the commutator cool. This means you are likely to see the sparks if you look in the right place.
Since it's more difficult to get an induction motor turning, they typically have a "start capacitor" mounted on the side of the motor to give an extra kick to get the stator turning. While induction motors use less power when running, the amperage they use at start-up is typically double the running amperage.

Sep 09, 2013 | Dewalt 12" Beveling Sliding Compound Miter...

1 Answer

Why to much sparks in the brushes


Low power and lots of sparks from the brushes is usually indicative of a damaged commutator (the ring where the brushes contact the armature) or burnt or broken windings on the armature. The only fix for either of these problems is to replace the armature.

Apr 28, 2012 | Clarke Power Products 7 in 9 in Angle...

1 Answer

Kitchenaid ksb465 electrical noise.


Arcing at the brushes is normal although if worn down enough, they can skip since their travel is limited to avoid damaging the copper commutator.Look at the brush guides closely; the simple spring that supplies a little tension to the brushes will 'bottom out' on a slot in the guide once the brushes get too short.

The skipping might be due to the type of speed regulator that is used; an older type was mechanical and didn't regulate well at low speeds.

Dec 30, 2011 | KitchenAid KSB465ER 4Speed Blender

1 Answer

Hoover ac120 , the washer will not get up to full spin speed, have just changed the carbon brushes on the motor, it does spin but struggles is there any other problem that could cause this?


Hi from retired Englishman in SW France,
Here is an extract from my guidance notes on no/poor spinning. The new brushes are probably not contacting the commutator properly, not without the commutator being skimmed ;-0(

It is not uncommon to find that the brushes are worn sufficiently for them to not make perfect contact with the commutator at the higher speeds- bouncing and sparking. Now, a word or two of advice from this retired Englishman in SW France. It might be suggested that just the brushes on the motor want changing; experience (of others) suggests that they may only last months rather than many years UNLESS the motor itself is refurbished. Refurbishment includes skimming the commutator on which the brushes run. Without skimming the brushes do not sit cleanly on the commutator (like the worn ones!), often causing excessive sparking and excessive wear on BOTH. Alternately a new motor! I changed the motor on our 19+ year-old Bosch at a cost of GBP250 ;-0(
The choice of course is entirely up to you- but do not forget that it is not an uncommon fault, especially if the washer is not exactly new. Others I have given this advice to have chosen new brushes and I don't blame them!


If this has assisted you please consider a 4 thumbs up for the rating.
Thanks and good luck!
John C

Jul 23, 2011 | Hoover Washing Machines

1 Answer

The spin cycle is essentially broken. The tumbler will not go into the high speed centifugal spin mode to partly dry out the clothes before they go into the drier. Is this caused by a failed electronic...


Hi from retired Englishman in SW France,

It is possible that the motor is malfunctioning, particularly when called upon to run the spin cycle. It is not uncommon to find that the brushes are worn sufficiently for them to not make perfect contact with the commutator at the higher speeds- bouncing and sparking. Now, a word or two of advice from this retired Englishman in SW France. It might be suggested that just the brushes on the motor want changing; experience (of others) suggests that they may only last months rather than many years UNLESS the motor itself is refurbished. Refurbishment includes skimming the commutator on which the brushes run. Without skimming the brushes do not sit cleanly on the commutator (like the worn ones!), often causing excessive sparking and excessive wear on BOTH. Alternately a new motor! I changed the motor on our 19+ year-old Bosch at a cost of GBP250 ;-0(
The choice of course is entirely up to you- but do not forget that it is not an uncommon fault, especially if the washer is not exactly new. Others I have given this advice to have chosen new brushes and I don't blame them!


If this has assisted you please consider a 4 thumbs up for the rating.
Thanks and good luck!
John C

Apr 16, 2011 | Maytag Neptune MAH5500B Front Load Washer

1 Answer

Whirlpool AWO / D4213671, no 859248910000 mostly does not go to hi spinning RPM but sometimes it does. Service technician means there is a wromg motor, however I doubt the motor could be sometimes good...


Hi from retired Englishman in SW France,
It does sound as if the motor requires replacement. It is not uncommon to find that the brushes are worn sufficiently for them to not make perfect contact with the commutator at the higher speeds- bouncing and sparking. Now, a word or two of advice from this retired Englishman in SW France. It might be suggested that just the brushes on the motor want changing; experience (of others) suggests that they may only last months rather than many years UNLESS the motor itself is refurbished. Refurbishment includes skimming the commutator on which the brushes run. Without skimming the brushes do not sit cleanly on the commutator (like the worn ones!), often causing excessive sparking and excessive wear on BOTH. Alternately a new motor! I changed the motor on our 19+ year-old Bosch at a cost of GBP250 ;-0(
The choice of course is entirely up to you- but do not forget that it is not an uncommon fault, especially if the washer is not exactly new. Others I have given this advice to have chosen new brushes and I don't blame them!
Good luck,
John C

Mar 23, 2011 | Whirlpool AWOE8748 Front Load Washer

1 Answer

Eureka canister vacuum cleaner Model 6865


The 6865 has a high rpm AMTEK Lamb motor, Brushes will seldom solve the problem at this stage.
Once the sparking and burning starts the conectiion between the brush and commutator is arcing and burning. If the sparks are blue, save your time.
A good service tech will run in brushes with a seating stone and a low voltage setup to allow new brushes to seat, but this is generally best accomplished on heavy duty , lower rpm motors.
IF YOUR ARMATURE IS SCRATCHY LOOKING OR WORN LIKE AN APPLE CORE,OR THE SEGMENTS ARE NOT PARALLEL IN THE SPACING YOU WILL NEED A NEW MOTOR.

Oct 16, 2009 | Vacuums

3 Answers

My Dewalt chopsaw is loosing power and sparks heavy in brushes


I worked at a tool rental center while attending college and learned to repair tools such as yours. Damage to the armature occurs mostly during low power situations or overloading the motor. The damage is usually visable. Notice burned looking copper windings or commutator bars. You can test with growler or meter. We would turn the commutator on an armature lathe to true the surface of the bars. If the commutator is not perfectly round the brushes will bounce thus cause the sparking that you see. Also you must clean the groves between the bars with a blade to clean out all metal filings that can cause short between bars. (Broken hacksaw blade ground to fit the groves will work fine)Sanding with sandpaper may not be perfect enough to stop sparking assuming the armature is not shorted. Moisture will not effect the brushes, and sanding them square is ok but you can put the curve back by cutting fine sandpaper into strip and wraping it around commutator and insert brush into holder against sandpaper. Not necessary thou because all new brushes are square. New brushes however will increase the tension of the brush against the commutator preventing bounce due to new spring and longer carbon. Good luck enjoy

Dec 15, 2008 | Dewalt Chop Saw D28700

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