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Can a damp basement ruin a washing machine?

My house is a rental and the floors and walls in the basement are damp year round, especially near the washer and dryer hook ups. Sometimes little rivers of water can even be seen. The washer and dryer we owned before moving in have both broke since living here. Now the washer that was with the property has broken. 3 machines broken in 3 years makes me nervous to purchase another of my own. Can the dampness be doing this or just bad luck?

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  • Contributor
  • 35 Answers

YES IT CAN

Posted on Nov 02, 2012

  • susanhank
    susanhank Nov 02, 2012

    Can you tell me how it damages it, so I can bring this up with my land lord? Thanks!

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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ginko
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SOURCE: Intermittent water on floor

Check the inlet valve hoses, even if inlet is at the back, the water may drip down and flow on the front part on the machine. There you also have the PUMP, a faulty pump may leak intermittently.
Here you get all diagrams and parts for your appliance.

Posted on Sep 25, 2009

vostendorp
  • 347 Answers

SOURCE: While finishing a load of laundry, during the

Yes I do know unfortunely the basket support broke. This support is mounted on to the back of the basket and goes through the rear bearing and the back half of the outer tub. This is a very extensive repair .the unit has to be totally disassembled ,if it only broke the support it is about 100.00 , but if the rear tub bearing is also damaged you may consider replacing the unit with a new one either way this is an expensive and extensive repair...

Posted on Sep 17, 2010

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My washing machine when it's changing cycles and water is going into the wall it overflows onto the floor how can I fix it


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This mold is from dampness in the basement.

Often this is a result of no vapor barrier installed when the insulation is put into the walls. Moisture is allowed to seep through the walls and gets into anything, even concrete.

The other problem may be from a lack of weeping tiles outside the house.

When the contractor formed the foundation walls, he was supposed to install weeping tiles to keep moisture out from outside.

Most older houses don't have this, and I'm seeing it more and more.

I would advise contacting a general contractor and getting some advice from them. You may have to have weeping tiles installed, which consists of tearing up the ground around the foundation to do so.

Then you may have to remove the flooring and wall panels as well as the drywall to install a vapor barrier.

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From an energy perspective, you may want the humidity set NOT below 50%. This will keep humidity below the level mold desires, but prevents the dehumidifier from doing more work and eating more energy than needed. A cheap battery powered temp/humidy meter left in your basement will help. Sources that include the "mold triangle" (temperature, water & food) often separate fact from expensive hype.

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