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Gas odor and smell coming from sink - Washing Machines

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  • Washing Mach... Master
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Pour some hot water into the sink and then some sanitizer.

Posted on Oct 30, 2012

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: odor coming from washing machine

The odor coming from your washing could indicate a problem with your
hot water heater or possibly your city's cold water supply line.
In some cases the odor might be originating from the drain located adjacent to
the washing machine. During long periods of inactivity, if no water is flushed
down the drain, a sewer smell will be emitted from the drain. To alleviate
this condition, just flush water down the drain.
I hope this helps you solve your problem.

Posted on Jan 17, 2011

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What does a freon leak in a deep freeze smell like?


Freon is odorless. A sewer odor could be caused by an unused sink, tub, or floor drain trap where the water has evaporated. A gas odor is a very serious issue that should be checked immediately by the gas company or the fire department. Gas can seep in from a leak outside the house or accumulate in a wall if a fitting fails.

Aug 26, 2014 | Kitchen Appliances - Others

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Smelly kitchen drain


Copy following link for sewer smell:
http://waterheatertimer.org/Plumbing-Vents.html
Copy following link if drain is clogged, and that appears to be source of smell: Use white vinegar and or hydrogen peroxide:
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-repair-and-install-Garbage-disposal.html#tubular
Copy following link if rotten-egg odor is coming from hot water:
http://waterheatertimer.org/Replace-anode-rod.html#smell
Add a comment... and it is possible that fixya will sent me note, and I can answer further questiions

Jul 05, 2013 | Home

1 Answer

GAS Odor? Gas dryer smells of gas after it runs a cycle, just replace ignition gas valve assembly, still has gas smell?


Did you also replace the coils on the valve assembly?
Which parts did you replace exactly?

Nov 07, 2012 | Dryers

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I smell an odor possibly electrical but I was unsure and had the gas company come and check. The gas company serviceman states the gas connections are good, nos gas smell in any areas of the house. The...


You should have an Amp draw on the system and it's motors. Your nose will be your guide in figuring out what component is getting hot. Smell circuit board and electric motors.

Jan 16, 2011 | Ruud UBHC Air Conditioner

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I have just remodeled a old condo with new toilets and I am getting a strong gas smell. How can I get rid of it. I am in Thailand and the building is 22 years old.


jajoy,

Did you connect the sanitary pipe stack to the sewer line that takes away the flushed effluent? Check to see that the pipe is connected, not leaking sewer gas, not plugged up with an animal carcass, and that the pipe extends through your roof three feet past the roof line (keeps smell out of house).

Nov 29, 2010 | Air Purifiers

1 Answer

Foul Odor


Odor from the water softening system can be attributed to several causes.
The best way to see if it is coming from the softener is to by-pass the softener and run the COLD water only for several minutes and see if the smell continues. Now run the HOT water and see if smell is coming from the water heater.
Some causes may be:
1. Hydrogen sulfide in the water supply (the water chemistry can change)
2. Sulfate reducing bacteria. Almost all water supplies have sulfates and if bacteria gets introduced into the plumbing system it acts with the sulfates to create sulfate reducing bacteria. Which creates a rotten egg smell in the water.
3. Salt additives can have many different affects on water chemistry and organics in the water causing musty, fishy, swampy type smells.
4. If you have a system for Tannins using salts with additives will always cause foul smells as it harms the Tannin media.
5. The ANODE rod in the water heater degrades and gives off a sulfur type, rotten egg smell.
RJ

Jul 22, 2010 | Culligan Under Sink Water Filter

1 Answer

When machine pumps out the smell comes through the sink


All plumbing drains whether under a sink or the stand pipe drain, for a washer, are required by LAW to have a trap to prevent the sewer gases from entering a home.

Sewer gases are dangerous in many ways, not the least of which is the terrible smell. Sewer gas can build up and if allowed to accumulate near an appliance that operates on gas (LP or natural) can combust and cause a fire and/or an explosion.

Yes, if you can do the installation youself, do it ASAP, or contact a licensed plumber and have installed a proper drain trap for the sink and also make sure the drain that the washer is draining into, also has a trap in it.

This will have a profound impact on the smell and will help alleviate foul odors from your sewer lines.

Hope you found this Very Helpful and best regards!

Sep 22, 2009 | Whirlpool AWM5145/2 Front Load Washer

1 Answer

Had standing gray water under house got the water out and fixed the drain problem but still have the smell How do we get rid of the smell of the stagnent water its bad. Thanks


Many commercial cleansers are good for neutralizing odors, but several common household products can be used as well. Vinegar is an extremely versatile grocery item that neutralizes many odors, including those left behind by pet accidents and skunk sprays.

Baking soda, whether applied dry to an area or mixed and sprayed with warm water, is another effective way to absorb and neutralize household odors. Baking soda carries the added benefit of absorbing moisture, so it often makes a good secondary application for a moist stubborn stain causing an odor. Citrus fruits like lemon and oranges deodorize and leave a pleasant smell behind. Using citrus juice on fabrics is not usually recommended, but they are good for things like running through garbage disposals.

May 11, 2009 | Dishwashers

3 Answers

Foul odor coming from kitchen sink/dishwasher area????


Hi Jenny - I had a terrible smell coming from under my sink, and I too thought it was a dishwasher/garbage disposal drainage issue. I used vinegar, baking soda, bleach and hot water on a daily basis. When I cut out the wallboard from under the sink and the smell got even worse, however, there was no sign of any water leaks or evidence of a dead animals. Come to find out, when I had a "friend" cut out a pass through from my kitchen (above the sink) into the den, he cut the pvc exhaust pipe and didn't re-route it nor cap allowing the fumes to escape outside via the attic. Thus, the fumes had no place to go other than down. The smell confused me because I thought it was rotten food or most likely a dead mouse trapped between the wall. The smell was actually causing me to get headaches. It's been almost 24 hours that this was repaired and I already can "smell" the difference. I hope this helps! Good luck.

Mar 30, 2009 | Tappan MDB531RF Dishwasher

2 Answers

Burning smell from AC Unit


http://www.hannabery.com/faq14.shtml

"Odor problems can be as serious as a gas leak or as simple as a dirty air filter. But remember, a good mechanic doesn't just use his hands. He uses his ears and nose. Unusual odors could indicate a serious problem and should not be ignored. 

We will go through each of the five categories and list the possible causes and things to check.


1. Electrical odor - Electrical odors are usually caused by parts overheating. Indoor blower motors are a common example. If there is a mechanical failure such as the bearings seizing up, the motor over-heats and the insulation on the wires and the motor windings themselves start to melt, causing the odor. 
Sometimes loose electrical connections cause wires or plastic relays to overheat causing electrical odors. 

It is possible for a very dirty air filter to cause the odor. If the airflow is restricted enough, it could cause electric resistance heaters to overheat, even burn-out. 

If you smell an electrical odor, check your air filter. If it is not blocked, shut off equipment at the breaker if possible and call for service. 


2. Burning odor - This is similar to an electrical odor only worse. It is also sometimes accompanied by smoke. Once again, this can be caused by parts or wiring burning-up. 

It can also be debri such as plastic getting into the ductwork and melting on the electric resistance heaters or heat exchanger. 

If you smell a burning odor, check your air filter. If it is not blocked, shut off equipment at the breaker if possible and call for service.



3. Gas odor - First of all, if you really smell gas and suspect a gas leak, you should open the windows, get out of the house, then call the gas company. 

Now excluding that "worse-case" scenario, if you notice an odor that smells like gas and it seems to be coming out of the supply vents, it usually isn't gas. Sometimes dust that settles on the heat exchanger during the summer months burns off at the beginning of each heating season and it smell just like gas. 

If the odor doesn't seem to be coming from the vents, try to pinpoint where the smell is coming from. Use your nose. If it is gas, it usually would be from a leak in a pipe fitting or at the equipment itself. 

Gas odor is the one that causes the most fear. People think of gas explosions or carbon-monoxide poisoning. Well, gas explosions are very rare and carbon-monoxide for the most part is odorless. 

Having said that though, don't take a gas odor lightly. If you can't locate the source of the odor and you are worried you have a gas leak, remember, open the windows, get out of the house, then call the gas company. 


4. Oil odor - Oil odors are usually caused by one of two things. An oil leak/drip or an oil burner that is not working properly. 

The oil leak is usually easy to spot. Just look for oil. Check the burner itself, the oil tank, filter and oil line. Sometimes it is just a matter of tightening a fitting. If there are no signs of an oil leak then it is most likely a burner problem. 

This can be caused by many things, too many to list. It could be a minor adjustment to the burner to a faulty or blocked chimney. From a bad fuel pump to a plugged oil nozzle. Listen for any unusual rumbling or banging sounds or smoke or soot while the burner is running. If you notice any of these things and/or you have an oil odor, you should call for service immediately. 

One other common problem today is that new houses are insulated so well and are built so tight that they run out of combustion air, causing odor problems. In this case it is just a matter of bringing in a fresh air for the burner. Call your local Heating Company to assist in a proper diagnosis. 


5. Damp and musty odor - This is more common in the air conditioning mode. Sometimes attic units or very damp basements have this problem. Check for air leaks in the return ducts. Check for water damage to the ducts or air handler itself. Possibly consider having your ducts cleaned. Run a dehumidifier and see if the odor goes away. 

But this odor problem is almost never due to a problem with your equipment. 

 


Final Tips:

Keep in mind that almost all heating systems cause an odor the first time they are fired-up. And the first few times at the beginning of each heating season. Brand new furnaces are coated with oil to keep the heat exchangers from rusting. This burns off, creating a bad odor - even smoke. But it usually only lasts for about 20 minutes. Opening the windows usually solves the problem. And the first few times the backup heat on a heat pump kicks on, it smells like an electrical smell. This might last for a few days but isn't that bad. If you are worried, call for service. 

Remember to check for a clean air filter and that your vents are opened. Check to see if the fan is working which mean your motor hasn't burned-up. 

Check for air leaks in damp areas, oil stains or rumbling sounds, strong gas odors - these all indicate problems. Do not ignore them. 

Hope this helps, remember - these are just rough guidelines and not all possible situations are covered."

Jul 28, 2008 | Sharp CV-P09FX Air Conditioner

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