Question about Briggs & Stratton 66set Panzer Tractor Decal 6hp 1960s

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Valve timing for B & S 10 hp side valve engine

Inlet valve is very slow to close, not fully closed until almost at TDC on compression. is this normal and if so how can compression be obtained.
Also splutters through carb when starting

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  • caird Feb 01, 2009

    Thanks.

    I have since found out the inlet cam has a decompression device that aids starting by reducing compression untill the engine fires and revs increase.This is why the inlet valve timing seems so slow. Centrefugal force overcomes the device, when the engine is running, and valve timing adjusts to normal.



    thanks for trying

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1 Suggested Answer

01fordeb
  • 1033 Answers

SOURCE: What would make B&S 15 hp engine constantly go

Sounds like the gas and carb needs a cleaning. The gas may smell alright, but if it's not strong fuel it will cause alot of this. Also the carb needs to be cleaned, such as the bowl and etc. I use starter fluid to clean these.

Posted on Apr 24, 2010

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