Question about Jandy LXI 400 NATURAL GAS POOL HEATER -

1 Answer

Fusible Link/vent switch circuit is open - Jandy LXI 400 NATURAL GAS POOL HEATER -

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Top Expert:

    An expert who has finished #1 on the weekly Top 10 Fixya Experts Leaderboard.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Jandy Master
  • 4,292 Answers

Heater overheated check gas pressure and make sure plenty of fresh air to burn check for sooting that will make it overheat then replace the fusible link if it opens again call a professional

Posted on Jan 30, 2016

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

No power in the swith starter


I'll guess that what you mean is there is no power to the starter switch. It would help, always, to know what you are working on, but in general, most cars have fusible links to protect major circuits. Yours may have blown a fusible link powering the ignition switch, or if you meant the starter solenoid, perhaps the link to it. If you are unfamiliar with these links, google "fusible links".

Jul 14, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Rollout switch open displays


Fusible link or the Roll out switch are one and the same...
if it burns out, or provides 'Open Circuit', then you had heat or flame exit the front of the heater instead of up!
This is a problem that needs correction.
Most common reason, Sooted Heat Exchanger / Tube Bundle.
dissassemble and clean it - not with a brush!!!
2nd possibility, especially if outdoor installation is a 'Downdraft'.
Don't just replace rollout switch - FIX the reason it burned out!

May 24, 2015 | Raypak Rp2100 Pool & Spa Heater Lonox 407k...

1 Answer

Power windows wont go up, abs light stays on, 4X4 light stays on, power door locks, sunroof won't oper, doors not opening from inside


When electrical stuff doesn't work it is a switch, fuse or fusible link. When you have multiple circuit failures it is likely a bad fusible link. Get out your shop manual for the car and check which fusible link feeds power to these devices; then, test it. If the fusible links all check good, it may be a major connector plug in the electrical harness that is loosing contact. Good luck.

May 14, 2015 | 1996 Ford Explorer

1 Answer

Fusible link / vent swich circuit is open


reset vent limit switch then check gas pressure if tooo low it will overheat and pop that if continued to reset and use without finding cause you will ruin heater you might need a vent stack if gas pressure is correct

Feb 15, 2014 | Jandy LXI 400 NATURAL GAS POOL HEATER -

1 Answer

I have an 84 impala and my alternator belt snapped off. Once i replaced the alternator belt, the car started and drove fine except my horn, interior lights, head lights, and tail lights don't work. I...


Circuit Breakers

Print
One device used to protect electrical components from burning out due to excessive current is a circuit breaker. Circuit breakers open and close the flow path for the electricity rapidly in order to protect the circuit if current is excessive. A circuit breaker is used on components which are more likely to draw excessive current such as the breaker found in the light switch that protects the headlight circuit. A separate 30 amp breaker mounted on the firewall or fuse block protects the power window and seat circuits, as applicable.

Fusible Links

Print
A fusible link is a protective device used in an electrical circuit and acts very much like a standard fuse. The major difference lies in that fusible links are larger and capable of conducting a higher amperage than most fuses. When the current increases beyond the rated amperage for a given link, the fusible metal of the wire link will melt, thus breaking the electrical circuit and preventing further damage to any other components or wiring. Whenever a fusible link is melted because of a short circuit, correct the cause before installing a new one. Most models have four fusible links.
REPLACING FUSIBLE LINKS

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable, followed by the positive cable. If the link is connected to the junction block or starter solenoid, disconnect it there as well.
  2. Cut the wiring harness right behind the link connector(s) and remove.
  3. Strip the insulation off the harness wire back 1 / 2 in (12.7mm).
  4. Position the clip around the new link and wiring harness or new connector and crimp it securely. Then, solder the connection, using rosin core solder and sufficient heat to guarantee a good connection. Repeat for the remaining connection.
  5. Tape all exposed wiring with electrical tape or use a heat shrink tube, if available. Where necessary, connect the link to the junction block or started solenoid. Reconnect the positive, followed by the negative battery cables.

Oct 21, 2013 | 1984 Chevrolet Impala

1 Answer

Changed ignition switch on 88 mustang after it wouldnt start. was also having issue with the blinkers not working unless the switch was exactly in the right position. battery is good. there is no...


If there is no power going INTO the ignition switch, you most likely have a burned fusible link. The ignition switch gets its power from fusible link "A" It is a 16 Gauge, BLACK fusible link connected to the YELLOW wire for circuit #37. The fusible link is connected to the starter relay located on the left fender apron between the washer fluid reservoir and the strut tower.

Circuit #37splits into 3 "legs" at splice #S105. One leg of this circuit goes to the fuse block where it feeds fuse #1 (15 Amp) and fuse #2 (10 Amp).

The other two legs of this circuit BOTH go to the ignition switch. (you should have TWO large yellow wires connected to the ignition switch.)

Aug 11, 2011 | 1993 Ford Mustang

1 Answer

Minimax NT error code E03 which indicates an open circuit at the fusible link. Q; where is the fusible link located? What would cause the link to overload? You are appreciated!!


The fusible link is the small skinny part in the center front of the cabinet behind the main access panel. It is 4" long, skinny and black. There are two wires. one going in, and one going out.
This part fails when there is a flame rollout. A flame rollout can be caused by many, many things and will take some digging to figure out. Some of the things that can cause this are:

1. Incorrect venting.
2. Incorrect gas pressure, or gas valve calibrated incorrectly.
3. Blockage in the venting.
4. Spider webs in gas manifold.
5. Leaking heat exchanger
6. soot build up on the burner tray.
7. soot build up on the heat exchanger
8. cracked or broken refractory kit.

Long story short, there is no easy answer to this problem. The fusible link is very cheap and easy for any person to replace. But the heater must be monitered afterward, and if you see ANYTHING out of the ordianry, I highly suggest a proffessionals help in the form of a service call.

The part number for the link is: 075173
It may be found on any online pool parts store. You should purchase 2 just in case it trips the link again immediately.

Jul 18, 2011 | Pentair Minimax NT Heater

1 Answer

Where is the fuse for the clutch inhibit relay


There is only a "fusible link" near battery(green wire). Circuit is as follows: Battery to Fusible link to ignition switch to interlock relay (right side fender under hood) to clutch switch to ground(Left kick panel)

May 11, 2011 | 1997 Nissan Pickup

1 Answer

Have a 2004 taurus.no owners manual. cig lighter fuse blew,dont know which one it is.


Fuses, Switches, Circuit Breakers And Relays Most vehicles use one or more fuse panels. This one is located on the driver’s side kick panel tcca6p01.jpg

It is possible for large surges of current to pass through the electrical system of your vehicle. If this surge of current were to reach the load in the circuit, this surge could burn it out or cause severe damage to the vehicle’s electrical system. It can overload the wiring, causing the harness to get hot and melt the insulation. To protect vehicle wiring, fuses, circuit breakers and/or fusible links are typically installed into the power supply wires throughout the electrical system. These items are nothing more than a built-in weak spot in the system. When an excessive amount of current flows through a circuit it causes an increase in heat throughout the wiring. Fuses and circuit breakers are designed as the weak link in the system and will disconnect the circuit to prevent damage to the components contained within that circuit. Components are equipped with connectors so they may be replaced in situations where they were damaged due to a power surge.
The following are descriptions as to how fuses and circuit breakers protect the electrical system:
  • Fuse- A fuse is a weak link in the system designed to create an open circuit when the amperage flowing through that circuit exceeds the limits of the fuse. As the amperage increases, the conductor within the fuse heats up and eventually melts and breaks apart. This open circuit interrupts the flow of current and protects the components in the circuit.
  • Circuit Breaker- A circuit breaker is a "self-repairing" fuse. It will open the circuit in the same fashion as a fuse. The surge creates heat the same way that a fuse is affected. When the surge subsides and the circuit cools down, the circuit breaker will reset and allow current to flow through the circuit. Typically circuit breakers do not need to be replaced.
  • Fusible Link- A fusible link (fuse link or main link) is a short length of special, high temperature insulated wire that acts as a fuse. When an excessive electrical current passes through a fusible link, the thin gauge wire inside the link melts, creating an open to protect the circuit. To repair the circuit, the link must be replaced. Some newer type fusible links are housed in plug-in modules, which are simply replaced like a fuse, while older type fusible links must be cut and spliced if they melt
CAUTION
Always replace fuses, circuit breakers and fusible links with identically rated components. Under no circumstances should a protection device of higher or lower amperage rating be substituted.
---
I would get a fuse tester that can test fuses while still installed and powered up. It will light if the fuse is blown when applied to the two tabs that are exposed on fuses that are installed in your Ford product.

Check the fuse box under the dash on the driver's side, and check to see if there are any fuses under the hood.

If you don't have the tool, try to look for stickers or download the manual from ford.com.

http://www.ford.com/owner-services/customer-support

Jul 31, 2010 | 2004 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

Power windows wont work what fuses can i check i have replaces the driverside switch.


Fuses, Switches, Circuit Breakers And Relays
Check under hood and under the dash driver's side.
There may be a sticker on the inside of the panel cover that tells you the legend. Otherwise, it requires testing each and every one of those fuses, preferably with a fuse tester that can do it more expediently than pulling each one out and looking for a broken conductor.


Most vehicles use one or more fuse panels. This one is located on the driver’s side kick panel tcca6p01.jpg

It is possible for large surges of current to pass through the electrical system of your vehicle. If this surge of current were to reach the load in the circuit, this surge could burn it out or cause severe damage to the vehicle’s electrical system. It can overload the wiring, causing the harness to get hot and melt the insulation. To protect vehicle wiring, fuses, circuit breakers and/or fusible links are typically installed into the power supply wires throughout the electrical system. These items are nothing more than a built-in weak spot in the system. When an excessive amount of current flows through a circuit it causes an increase in heat throughout the wiring. Fuses and circuit breakers are designed as the weak link in the system and will disconnect the circuit to prevent damage to the components contained within that circuit. Components are equipped with connectors so they may be replaced in situations where they were damaged due to a power surge.
The following are descriptions as to how fuses and circuit breakers protect the electrical system:
  • Fuse- A fuse is a weak link in the system designed to create an open circuit when the amperage flowing through that circuit exceeds the limits of the fuse. As the amperage increases, the conductor within the fuse heats up and eventually melts and breaks apart. This open circuit interrupts the flow of current and protects the components in the circuit.
  • Circuit Breaker- A circuit breaker is a "self-repairing" fuse. It will open the circuit in the same fashion as a fuse. The surge creates heat the same way that a fuse is affected. When the surge subsides and the circuit cools down, the circuit breaker will reset and allow current to flow through the circuit. Typically circuit breakers do not need to be replaced.
  • Fusible Link- A fusible link (fuse link or main link) is a short length of special, high temperature insulated wire that acts as a fuse. When an excessive electrical current passes through a fusible link, the thin gauge wire inside the link melts, creating an open to protect the circuit. To repair the circuit, the link must be replaced. Some newer type fusible links are housed in plug-in modules, which are simply replaced like a fuse, while older type fusible links must be cut and spliced if they melt
CAUTION
Always replace fuses, circuit breakers and fusible links with identically rated components. Under no circumstances should a protection device of higher or lower amperage rating be substituted.
Switches Switches are used in electrical circuits to control current flow. The most common use of relays and switches is to open and close circuits between the battery and various electrical loads in a circuit. loads are rated according to the amount of amperage they can handle. All of the current that the controlled load uses flows through a switch. Using a switch with an amperage rating lower than what the circuit is rated for could overload and cause damage to the components located on that circuit. Relays
The underhood fuse and relay panel contains fuses, relays, flashers and fusible links tcca6p02.jpg

Relays are used to control high-current loads with lower currents. Since these some loads require a large amount of current, the thickness of the wire in the circuit is also greater. If a switch were used to control the circuit, all of the current required to power the high-current load would have to pass through the switch. From a design standpoint, relays are used to limit current through switches and reduce the amount of heavy gauge wiring in the vehicle.
Relays are constructed of a set of switch contacts and a small electro-magnetic coil. When current flow through the coil a magnetic field is created. This field causes the contacts to touch, in turn completing the high-current circuit. Typically, relays are constructed so that the secondary contacts are open when the relay is de-energized (turned off). Circuits where relays are used include, but are not limited to, the horns, headlights, starter motor, electric fuel pump, blower motor and cooling fan motor.
Relays are composed of a coil and a set of switch contacts. The large wires connect a high current power source to one side of the relay switch contacts and from the other side of the relay switch contacts to the load. The smaller wires connect a low current power source to the relay control coil and from the control coil to the control switch and then to ground. tcca6g02.gif

Load Every electrical circuit must include a "load'' (something to consume voltage from the power source). Loads are resistances included in circuits to limit current flow. Loads are the components installed in circuits, such as headlights, wiper motors, door lock solenoids. Without a load, the battery would flow all of its energy through a circuit directly to ground. This is called a "dead-short to ground". The unchecked flow of electricity would cause a great amount of damage to the circuit by developing a tremendous amount of heat. Short circuits can develop sufficient heat to melt the insulation of surrounding wires, even reducing a multiple wire cable to a lump of plastic and copper.

Jul 26, 2010 | 2001 Ford Taurus

Not finding what you are looking for?
Jandy LXI 400 NATURAL GAS POOL HEATER - Logo

Related Topics:

64 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Jandy Pool & Spa Experts

David Spradling
David Spradling

Level 3 Expert

4292 Answers

Pj Kiley
Pj Kiley

Level 1 Expert

21 Answers

Bill Jordan

Level 2 Expert

372 Answers

Are you a Jandy Pool and Spa Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...