Question about Nikon D80 Digital Camera

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Nikon d80 viewfinder no digital displays

The exposure metre, number of photographs remaining, shutter speed and aperture settings do not display in my viewfinder anymore. other features are fine. is this something i accidently turned off or is my camera faulty?

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  • Nikon Expert
  • 305 Answers

Turn them on in the menu

Posted on Aug 06, 2014

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Nikon D50 LCD Display does not work

NatD, The D50 and indeed most SLR digital cameras [ I have a D40 ] does not allow you to take pictures using the LCD display ... this is by design, you are meant to use the viewfinder and the image you see through it is straight through the lens via a mirror block [ called a reflex pentamirror or prism ]. When the mirror is down such that you can see the image in the viewfinder it is obscuring the sensor [ the bit that takes the picture ] and when you take a shot the mirror lifts and the picture is recorded. Its this reason that DSLR's dont use the LCD to shoot, however there are a few now available that do let you do this, such as olympus, new panasonic one and higher end Nikon and Canon cameras. Hope this explains it without getting too detailed!

Posted on Dec 06, 2007

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Aperture and Shutter Speed for the Nikon Coolpix s550

Go to the shooting menu and then press the ISO sensitivity option

Posted on Feb 22, 2009

  • 7 Answers

SOURCE: fEE error code on nikon d80

To solve this all you need to do is turn the lens' aperture ring (the one nearest the camera body) to the smallest number (probably 22 or 32).

Posted on Jul 05, 2009

BubbaGuru
  • 70 Answers

SOURCE: F-- on Nikon D90's display

Lense and body connection problem...Try removing and replacing he lens. Also you can try to gentley turn the lens on the body to make the contacts touch better...

Posted on Jul 05, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: shutter speed on my nikon d80 is to slow

Try CUSTOM SETTINGS MENU 31. (turn off EXP. delay mode).

Posted on Dec 11, 2009

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The light meter is not working, in AV mode the shutter speed constantly remain at 30 seconds.


It would be nice to know what camera make and model you have. However in AV mode the photographer inputs the aperture (AV meaning Aperture Priority). If you then have the aperture set at (for example) F11 and dim lighting conditions the shutter speed will be long in an attempt to give the correct exposure. If you have a meter reading you see in the viewfinder the needle will be way to the - side of the scale it may be dim enough that attempting to adjust the Aperture a few stops makes no difference in this reading. My though is, if the meter is working in "P" program and you are getting correct exposure then it's user input error rather then meter malfunction.

Jan 07, 2011 | Canon Cameras

Tip

How does aperture setting affect a photograph?


The aperture is the opening in the lens through which light passes to the image sensor. Changing the aperture setting allows you to control the depth of field of a photograph. When the aperture is opened to a widersetting, (indicated by a lower f-stop number) more light is passed to the imagesensor, creating more shallow depth of field. Closing the aperture (indicatedby a higher f-stop number) allows less light to pass to the image sensor,creating wider depth of field.

NOTE: The aperture setting is one of three primary settings usedto control the overall exposure of a photograph. The other two primary settingsare ISO and shutter speed. Because the three settings work together to produce the overall exposure for a photograph, changingthe aperture setting will require complimentary changes to either the ISO or shutter speed to produce a properly exposed photograph. These changes will bemade automatically by the camera in the Auto, Program, Aperture-priority andShutter-priority modes.

There are two ways tocontrol the aperture setting on the camera:
  • Aperture-priority mode (A) - When shooting in Aperture priority mode (A), you set the aperture value and the camera automatically sets the optimum shutter speed for you.
  • Manual mode (M) - When shooting in Manual mode (M), you control both aperture and shutter speed, which gives you maximum creative control to achieve the exact results you want.

on Jan 08, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

Assistance in using the P for taking pictures How do you use the dials to determine a good picture.


The settings depend on what you're trying to say with the picture. You probably wouldn't want the same settings for a portrait as you would for a landscape. Two photographers at the same place and time with identical cameras probably wouldn't use the same settings, as each photographer has his/her personal style.
In the Program mode the camera select the shutter speed and aperture it deems optimal. You can turn the command dial to adjust the exposure, increasing the shutter speed and opening up the aperture, or decreasing the shutter speed and closing down the aperture by turning it the other way. Either way, the exposure itself remains the same.
If you're taking a landscape picture, you'd probably want a small aperture to get the maximum depth of field. If you're taking a portrait, you'd probably want a large aperture to blur the background. If you're taking an action picture, you'd probably want a fast shutter speed to capture the action. Of course, those are just guidelines. Sometimes you want to blur the action, or throw some portion of the picture out of focus. It's up to you. You use the settings to take YOUR picture.

Oct 24, 2010 | Nikon D90 Digital Camera with 18-105mm...

1 Answer

I'm getting the F- - code in the screen of my Nikon D80 SLR. Also, when I press down on the button to take a picture it shows r11 where it shows the number of photos available to take.


i think the f-- code means its not recognizing your lens correctly. make sure all the contacts on lens and camera are clean. the r11 is the buffer. nothing to worry about. The number of images that can be stored in the memory buffer at current settings is shown in the exposure-count displays in the
viewfinder and control panel while the shutter-release button is pressed. This number is updated as photographs are transferred to the memory card and more memory becomes available in the buff er. If 0 is displayed, the buff er is full and shooting will slow. Shooting can continue up to a maximum of 100 shots.

you can get the d80 manual here if you dont have it
http://www.nikonusa.com/pdf/manuals/dslr/D80_en.pdf

Mar 29, 2010 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

1 Answer

I have a Nikon D80 SLR camera, and have purchased an Opteka 650 x 1300 mm zoom lens (fit on). I have changed the setting on the camera to manual, and it will now take photographs, however the images are...


You can't meter through that lens. If the images are too dark, either slow down the shutter speed or open the aperture. Keep going until the picture looks okay on the monitor. If you know how to use the histogram, that's even better. If you go too far and get images too light, reverse the process (faster shutter speed or smaller aperture).

If you have another light meter, you can use that to get a ballpark exposure to start with. Alternatively, take a reading with your other lens at the longest zoom.

Jun 15, 2009 | Nikon SLR D80 Digital SLR Camera Digital...

1 Answer

How to KNOW the light is right 4 an Olympus OM20 Manual camera?


OM-20 was basically a upgraded OM-10 with the manual adapter built in and a number of other refinements.

The viewfinder has LED's to show the shutter speed recommended by the camera's lightmeter for the ISO and aperture selected. It also has an exposure compensation indicator (the +/- symbol) and an indicator for flash ready which doubles up as a post-exposure flash confirmation. There is also the indicator lamp to show manual mode has been selected. OM-10 lacks the manual mode lamp and the +/- indicator.

Like the OM-10, the OM-20 is primarily an aperture priority automatic camera. In this mode you set the ISO film speed, choose which aperture you wish to use (with the ability to use the lens depth of field preview button) and then the camera selects the correct shutter speed. The +/- exposure compensation control allows the user to tell the camera to modify the recommended shutter speed by up to two stops either way.

In manual mode, there is no manual metering. The light meter behaves exactly as it does in aperture priority mode and the viewfinder shows the recommended shutter speed and not the manually selected one. Correct metering is therefore a case of adjusting the aperture first, and then choosing the correct shutter speed indicated in the viewfinder. If the user then decides to select a different shutter speed, then the aperture ring must be adjusted to maintain the correct exposure. For example the aperture is set to f8 and the camera recommends 1/60th of a second. The user decides that a faster shutter speed is required and chooses 1/250th, but the viewfinder remains showing 1/60th. In order to keep the same exposure value the user must open the aperture by two full stops to f4. The camera's light meter will detect the new aperture setting and providing the light on the object is unchanged the viewfinder shutter speed display should now show 1/250th as well to confirm the correct adjustment. Alternatively, the user can choose the shutter speed first by looking at what has been set on the control ring (or by turning the ring to the end of its travel and then counting the clicks from there as all experienced OM users do) and then turning the aperture ring until the shutter speed shown in the viewfinder matches what's been manually set.

It all sounds clumsy and complex but is done far more quickly than I've taken to type this and becomes second nature.

Aperture priority metering is selected on the camera by choosing AUTO on the mode selecter. In this mode the shutter speed ring has no effect and the viewfinder always displays the automatically selected shutter speed.

May 09, 2009 | Olympus OM-2000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Blue corners when shooting in BULB


With the same exposure settings, you should get the same result. When using Bulb in Manual mode, you also need to be sure you have set the lens aperture to the largest opening (lowest number). And don't forget to set ISO to 1600. Since the D80 has shutter speeds as long as 30" (minutes) I recommend you use them instead of Bulb, unless you need longer.

The blue areas are heat noise from long exposure -- other electronic components near the sensor are generating heat from the constant current flow. Be sure you check your Shooting Menu settings to set Long Exposure NR to ON and also High ISO NR to HIGH.

Apr 02, 2009 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

1 Answer

Black area in photograph


Unless you are using high-end Nikon Speedlights with camera and flash set for Auto FP High-Speed Sync, your top flash sync shutter speed on the D80 is 1/200 second. The black band you are seeing at faster shutter speeds is because the second curtain of the shutter begins to close before the first curtain reaches the fully-open position (which is when the flash fires). The higher the shutter speed, the shorter the gap between first and second curtains. To get full exposure with flash, there must be an instant when the shutter is fully open -- first curtain completed travel, second curtain not started yet.

"As the speed increases the final image should get lighter" applies to ISO speed. Higher shutter speeds mean less light reaching the sensor, but that's not the cause of the black bands.

Mar 22, 2009 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

1 Answer

I have a d80 and I have two problems: 1) I can't get the monitor to work while I am taking the picture, I can only review it. 2)Whenever I take the aperture out of the locked position of 22, the aperture...


1) The D80 does not have a Live View capability, you must use the viewfinder. The display is for menus and reviews.

2) Leave the lens locked at the smallest aperture (highest number). Change the aperture using the command wheels.

The r11 is not an error, it's simply an indication of how many more pics you can take in a burst before the buffer fills.

Aug 15, 2008 | Nikon Cameras

1 Answer

Nikon D80 Camera


During shooting, or when the shutter-release button is pressed halfway, the number of images that can be stored in the memory buffer at current settings is shown on the exposure-count displays in the control panel and viewfinder. "r06" indicates that six images can fit in the camera's buffer, "r08" would indicate eight frames. Any other number could be displayed as well. Burst mode is used when you want to hold down the shutter button and continuously shoot. You are probably shooting in burst mode and your buffer is full, set the camera to single shot and see if that helps.

Jul 02, 2008 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

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