Question about Heaters

1 Answer

Electric baseboard heat not getting hot

I just installed electric baseboard in my cabin. There is 20ft (1-8', 2-6') of baseboard on 1 electric thermostat in my living/dining room. Each additional room has either 8' or 6' of baseboard with their own electric thermostats. All the zones are fed with their own 20amp breaker and when tested with a meter, they are not overdrawing. The baseboards fins get warm to the touch, but never hot where you cant touch the fins. Can anyone offer suggestions? I want to add, that they are all 240 volt heaters and are all on their own 20amp breakers.

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that gotĀ 5 achievements.

    Novelist:

    An expert who has written 50 answers of more than 400 characters.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 20 times.

  • Expert
  • 189 Answers

Is your fuse box and main power source large enough to handle the full load if all are turned on at the same time? Are you uses two pole breakers? you might only be feeding with 110 volt. This would prevent them from getting very hot.

Posted on Mar 08, 2009

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

My electric baseboard heaters make a pinging sound which drives me nuts when I am trying to sleep! Any suggestions other than changing the unit? Thanks


Electric baseboard heaters heat by radiant heat. This mean the heater is heating the metal of the heater first which causes expansion of the metal. This will cause popping metal sounds becouse it is heating up. When it kicks off, by the thermostat, it starts to cool which causes contraction of metal. This will also cause noise. Most all base board heaters I have installed and worked on does this. Sorry there is little to nothing you can do. :)

Jan 25, 2011 | Marley HBB1004 Electric Baseboard Heater

1 Answer

Heat


What is it that you are trying to do? Do you have a piece of hot water baseboard heater and you want to 'power' it with an electric hot water heater?

Codes aside, I don't see why it would not work. You will have to put a circulator (and a temp control device) on it to move the water.

This is not going to be a very economical heating system.

Feb 05, 2010 | Marley Electric Hydronic Baseboard Heater,...

2 Answers

IS A HYDRONIC ELECTRIC BASEBOARD MORE EFFICENT THEN THE STANDARD ELECTRIC BASEBOARD HEATER


I have some confusion about what you are asking......

There is no such thing as "Hydronic Electric Baseboards"......

I am assuming you are referring to the oil filled baseboard heaters. If so....

The same amount of btu's required to heat a space remain the same whether the elements heat a liquid to warm the air or whether they heat the air directly, the same amount of wattage will be consumed. So, their is no more or less efficiency between the two.

If you are referring to "Hydronic Baseboard Heaters" (these baseboards are fed from a boiler with a pump) Then....I will assume that it is a gas boiler. In which case, the gas boiler would be more cost efficient to operate. If it is an electric the same rule applies as above......the cost is the same.

Oct 04, 2009 | Fahrenheat FBE15002 Baseboard Heater

3 Answers

How do you reduce an electric bill in a all electric house?


The biggest wasters of electrical energy are Heat and A/c, water heaters,dryers and ranges. The more you insulate the less you have to cool or heat. If you live in a warm climate, consider installing an attic fan that runs on a thermostat or timer. During the summer allow it to run, during winter turn it off. Ceiling fans in rooms that are occupied create the illusion of being cooler, allowing the thermostat to be turned up.I'm not sure of the exact numbers but any thermostat setting on your a/c below 78 is more inefficient so try kicking the a/c up and the heat down. I'm a Florida boy so I can't tell you much about baseboard heaters. I know that anything that heats things up cost a lot in energy.

Consider installing a hot water heater timer. Commonly called a "Little Grey Box". Whenever your water heater is not actually being used it is still heating the water. A big waster. Once installed set the timer to cycle the water heater off during times when you commonly don't use it. Overnight,when your at work etc....

Somewhat antiquated, but a clothesline always uses 100% less energy than a clothes dryer. :) Short of this, try to fill the dryer all the way and make sure your dryer vent and lint trap are clear.

Microwaves draw 1/3 the energy of a range and run for 1/10 of the time. Microwave as many things as you can. In our house we have started microwaving canned veggies and boxed side dishes and such.

These are the big ones I've done at my house. A lot of the other things seemed to be more work than they are worth. Some actually end up costing you more if you don't own the house for decades.

There are many sites you can visit such as your local power company and possibly your local government pages.

Good luck. I'm in the same boat with the high power bill.

Mar 24, 2009 | Fahrenheat F2543 Baseboard Heater

4 Answers

Installing hot water baseboard heater


IF THEY COME WITH THE COVERS SET THEM AGAINST THE WALL WHERE TO BE INSTALLED, THERE ARE MOUNTING BRAKETS INSIDE THE WALL PLATE AND THE PIPE SHOULD SIT ON THE BRACKETS,, APROX 3-4 INCHES OFF FLOOR,

Jan 04, 2009 | Marley Electric Hydronic Baseboard Heater,...

1 Answer

Electric baseboard heaters


measure the room, then multiply the length by the width to get the square feet you want to heat. multiply this by 10 and that is the watts you need to heat the room assuming you are using standard 220/240v baseboards.

Dec 25, 2008 | Marley Electric Hydronic Baseboard Heater,...

1 Answer

Electric Hydronic Baseboard Heater Under Electrical Recepticle


Hello,
I believe you interpretation of the code is a bit skewed in that the fundamental concern is to not route power cords over a heat source which might cause the insulation on that wire to exceed its rated operating temp and fail. The heaters themselves have shrowds over them so there are no exposed surfaces hot enough to melt wire insulation and when you think about it ..2000 watts disipated over a long baseboard section is not that hot. If I were you, I would go ahead and install them and not worry about the warning.. The warning also removes any liability from the heater manufacturer in the event something happens.. Common sense would dictate that you wouldn't intentionally drape power cords all over the heaters... Just use common sense and not worry about it..
Regards,
Rick

Dec 01, 2008 | Marley Electric Hydronic Baseboard Heater,...

1 Answer

High Altitude Electric Heaters


I have never heard of altitude effecting the electric. Watts amps and volts are different than burning a gas, like propane. The high altitude has less oxygen thus requiring the combustion to be effected. If your wires are over heating when you use maximum wattage (amps) you need to install larger wire with the correct size breaker. Look up ohms law. Its a basic electrical formula and will help you get this right.

Dec 26, 2007 | Dayton Electric Heater

Not finding what you are looking for?
Heaters Logo

Related Topics:

663 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Heaters Experts

paulcarew

Level 3 Expert

1875 Answers

Dan Webster
Dan Webster

Level 3 Expert

8147 Answers

Mack Baxter

Level 3 Expert

379 Answers

Are you a Heater Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...