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Clicking noise from front valves

I replaced lower intake gaskets retorqued rocker arms and now sounds like a lifter tick from front end never did before though

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2 Answers

If ticking sound don't go away after flushing oil change is there a need to repair engine


Ticking sound is typical of slack in the valve train. Try using a wood dowell "stethescope" and touch it to the rocker arm cover over each cylinder. If a rocker arm adjustment is too slack, you'll hear a clicking sound rather than a muted murmur. If you find the noisy lifter you will need to remove the rocker arm cover and adjust it. CAUTION NOTE - It is possible that a hydraulic lifter may have some grit in the internal valve. That would stop the lifter from functioning properly.

Mar 06, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Ticking sounds engine


Without hearing the noise I can only guess. Probably a hydraulic lifter. Many 50s, 60s and 70s engines had this problem. Varnish builds up in the lifter body. If it's just a SLIGHT tick, I wouldn't worry about it. You could try a different brand of oil and some engine cleaner.

As an aside, I personally own a 91 GMC pick-up with a 4.3. It had a clicking lifter on start up and 10 min after. I always used Castrol oil, supposedly one of the best. Switched to Penzoil, it was on sale. No more click!

If you want to try and un-stick it, try this. Be forewarned, it WILL make a mess! Try and locate which side of the engine the noise is coming from. Remove the valve cover. Inspect for bent pushrods and rocker arm stud pulling out of the head. If you find either of these problems, disassemble the whole valve train and inspect/replace worn parts. Back then, Pontiacs and SBCs were notorious for studs pulling out of the head if you ran them hard.

Start engine. Oil will spray/mist everywhere. You were warned. LOL
Watch the rocker arms as it idles. If one does not move as far as the others, and the click is more of a bang, you have a collapsed lifter. A worn cam lobe will be much more quiet than a collapsed lifter, but you will see decreased movement of the rocker arm. Replacement is the only option on both.

Take a RUBBER (not metal ) or plastic dead-blow hammer and rap the rocker arm(s) several times where the pushrod mates with it. Over the years I have used this method with approx 60% success.

May 04, 2013 | 1967 Pontiac GTO

3 Answers

I have a loud ticking under my valve cover. 97 ford escort. I think its a loose valve but is it some thing i can fix. I know a little about cars. but not an expert


not a valve, but a lifter. I will paste procedure below. You judge if you can do it or not. Recommend you replace them all while you're in there. If you let this go, the lifter will wear out the camshaft. Lifters are $22 each, and you have 8 of them. You will also need a new valve cover gasket.
Please let me know if you have questions, and thanks for using FixYa.

2.0L Engine
SOHC engine
See Figures 6, 7, 8 and 9
  1. Disconnect the engine air cleaner-to-valve cover hose from the cover by compressing the hose clamp with pliers and sliding the clamp back, then separate the hose from the cover.
  2. Remove the spark plug wire separators from the valve cover and set the wire assemblies aside.
  3. Unfasten the three valve cover retaining bolts.
  4. Remove the valve cover and gasket from the cylinder head.
WARNING Do not use any abrasive grinding discs to remove gasket material. Use a plastic manual gasket scraper to remove the gasket residue. Be careful not to scratch or gouge the aluminum sealing surfaces when cleaning them.
  1. Remove the old gasket material from the cylinder head and valve cover mating surfaces.

jturcotte_163.jpg

Fig. Fig. 6: Remove the spark plug wire separators from the valve cover

jturcotte_164.jpg

Fig. Fig. 7: Compress the engine air cleaner-to-valve cover hose clamp with pliers, and slide the clamp back ...


jturcotte_165.jpg

Fig. Fig. 8: ... then disconnect the hose from the valve cover


jturcotte_166.jpg

Fig. Fig. 9: Unfasten the valve cover retainers and remove the valve cover-2.0L SOHC engine


If removing more than one valve lifter (tappet), mark the lifters and their locations as they must be installed in their original bores.

  1. Remove the rocker arm(s).
  2. Unfasten the lifter guide plate retainer.
  3. Remove the guide plate and the lifter.


To install:
  1. The oil feed hole in the lifter must face away from the oil feed hole in the cylinder head.
  2. Lubricate the lifter(s) with clean 5W-30 engine oil and install them in their original bores.

Make sure the lifter guide plate retainer tabs are towards the rear of the cylinder head, and the lifter guide plate tabs are towards the front of the cylinder head.
  1. Install the lifter guide plate and tighten the retainer.
  2. Install the rocker arms.
Do not use any sealer with a silicone type gasket.
  1. Install a new gasket and the valve cover.
  2. Install and tighten the valve cover retainers to 71-97 inch lbs. (8-11.5 Nm).
  3. Attach the spark plug wire separators to the cylinder head.
  4. Connect the engine air cleaner-to-valve cover hose and engage the hose clamp

Jan 19, 2011 | Ford Escort Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

A ticking sound comming from the lower end of the moter


mcdevito75 here, Not really a lifter as much as could be a rocker arm, check for proper oil level. No way to test without removeing the valve cover., If high mileage, it"s not worth it, once you change 1 rocker you"ll have to change them all approx $20.. each rocker arm part.

Jun 18, 2010 | 2004 Hummer H2

1 Answer

Valve train noise


The ticking sound is most likely caused by uneven wear on the cam lobes. The next time you've got the valve covers off, take a look at the cams and you will likely see scuff marks on one or more of the high-points of the camshaft lobes. This can cause a ticking sound each time that part of the lobe comes in contact with the rocker arm. The only cure for this would be to replace the cam and rocker arms - which is not worth the many $$ it will cost. The noise may be annoying, but isn't anything to worry about. My Goldwing started making a ticking sound at about 90,000 miles - and continues to this day, now with more than 169,000 miles on the engine.
Uneven cam lobe wear can also cause lateral movement of the rocker arms - and a ticking sound as the rockers move slightly sideways on their shafts (note the springs on the shafts that hold the rockers lightly to one side).
I should also mention that pitted valve stem tips can also cause a ticking noise. In any event, do not run the engine with less than the specified .004" valve tappet clearance as this can cause valve damage and compression loss.

May 28, 2010 | 1981 Honda GL 1100 Innerstate Gold Wing

1 Answer

Lifters are knocking and there is a missing in


lifters tick and noise is upper end of engine if lifters are making noise could be from a bad valve,bad lifter ,push rod ,oil pressure,rocker arm - need to take do compression test find out if valve problem and which cylinder is problem also take off valve cover and check for proper oiling of valve head and look to see if and are damaged or loose-------a knocking sound usually comes from lower end of engine,rod knock etc.and thats usually rebuild of engine

Nov 22, 2009 | 1994 Isuzu Trooper

1 Answer

I had the valve cover gasket changed on my 1996


on a v6 ? Low on oil? rear cam plugs leaking? The lifters are on the end of the rocker arms and may get clogged. I have had some luck running 0w30 mobil synthetic for about a week or so with a new oil filter [Not a fram filter] and after that put 10w30 synthetic oil back in and a new filter. Check for oil leaking at other locations. If the noise is at the front of engine near water pump it may be the hydraulic timing belt tensioner.

Oct 06, 2009 | 1996 Isuzu Rodeo

2 Answers

There is a ticking sound coming from teh drivers side of the motor top end when i start it up when i drive it goes away but its there when i start it or ideling


In order to give you a solution to your problem, I need to explain a little bit about the valve train in your engine, the engine itself, and how it works.

1.You have an Internal Combustion engine. It is a Four Stroke engine. The engine has a Cylinder Block with cylinders inside. There is a piston for each cylinder which goes up, and down. The piston/s are connected to a crankshaft. The crankshaft turns the transmission, which in turn turns the driveshaft, to the rear differential. The rear differential has axles, which the rear wheels are bolted to. The four strokes are , Intake Stroke, Compression Stroke, Combustion Stroke, and Exhaust Stroke.

The piston goes down the cylinder drawing the fuel/air mixture in. (Intake Stroke) The Intake valve opens. The piston comes back up the cylinder, and Compresses the fuel/air mixture. (Compression Stroke) Both the Intake and Exhaust valve are closed. The spark plug fires igniting the fuel/air mixture, and shoves the piston down. (Combustion Stroke) Finally the Exhaust valve opens, and expels the burnt gases. (Exhaust Stroke)
This page on Wikipedia.org, may help explain the process. The third 'photo' down on the right is an animation showing the process.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internal_combustion_engine
The animation shows an engine with an Overhead Camshaft. Your camshaft is located in the Cylinder Block, and not in the Cylinder Head, as shown.

2.Your Camshaft is a shaft with egg shaped lobes on it. As the tip of the egg shape comes to the top, it pushes up on a Hydraulic Lifter. This lifter in turn pushes up on a Pushrod, which pushes up on a Rocker Arm. The Rocker Arm in turn pushes down on either the Intake Valve, or the Exhaust Valve, opening them.

A Rocker Arm is shaped a lot like a See-saw. Just like the one's at a child's playground. As one side goes up, the other side comes down. The Pushrod pushes up on one side of the Rocker Arm, and the other side of the Rocker Arm pushes down on the valve, opening it.

A Hydraulic Lifter is a small cylinder that has a piston in it. Oil goes through a tiny hole in the side of the lifter, and this keeps the piston in a certain position. (That's why this lifter is named 'Hydraulic', because it uses oil inside) The Pushrod rests on this piston. The hydraulic action of the Hydraulic Lifter, keeps slack out of the valve train. The pushrod to rocker arm distance, and the rocker arm to valve distance.

What you are hearing, is a clicking sound from clearance being created, in-between the pushrod to rocker arm, and/or rocker arm to valve stem. A metal to metal clicking sound.

Solution? Depends on how mechanically inclined you are, or you may want to refer this job to an auto repair shop. The valve cover needs to be removed, and the nut on each rocker arm needs to be adjusted. Adjusting the nut down, (Clockwise), pushes the rocker arm down on the rocker arm stud, a little. This removes the slack, and makes things nice, and quiet again. Your engine will also run better, and you'll get better gas mileage.

DON'T do this, or have it down, and eventually the slack that is in there will increase. This will break parts! There IS a technique in doing this. If you know of someone who is good at adjusting valves, they can do it. They MUST be good however. If you adjust the Rocker Arm Nut too far down, you will lose power, and the exhaust valve face will burn. Not far enough down, and you get the clicking sound you hear now. About 1/4 turn down, to 1/2 turn down, should do it.

Jul 26, 2009 | 1998 Chevrolet S-10 Pickup

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