Question about AMD Athlon 64 X2 3800+ Dual Core Processor - Socket 939 (AMDX23800)

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Motherboard I have a amd athon 64x2 4200 and Im looking for a good replacement motherboard. Im building up a used computer.The box is a build albe box no name. I have looked into asus boards and have come up with a few, asus a8nla ge-force,or msi k9n platinum,or the one i like is new kind of, m2n32-sli deluxe, But I dont know if the cpu is to small for the last one..Where can I go to find a good replace or can you help me, Im stating from scratch, and Im not cheep. Good stuff.

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  • royboysjoys Jan 03, 2009

    Thanks so much but do you think the m2n32-sli deluxe is to much board...?I can always up grade chip later. I just like the reviews that is has and it also looks cool for a clear sided box. I'm trying to go for looks as well as grade of components and parts.is there any other good looking boards that you can suggest. Or I guess I should ask if the chip will work in the m2n32 board. Or do you think it is not recommended to use this chip in that board.

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A8n5 board would wooks as well jim

Posted on Nov 25, 2011

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New computer build will not POST


Check your hard drive and weather or not you have the drive set to IDE or ACH

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Tip

How to Build a Computer


Have you ever thought about building your own computer? Actually buying a motherboard and a case ­along with all the supporting components and assembling the whole thing yourself?
Here are three reasons why you might want to consider taking the plunge:
  1. You will be able to create a custom machine that exactly matches your needs.
  2. It will be much easier to upgrade your machine in the future because you will understand it completely.
  3. You may be able to save some money.
And, if you have never done it before, you will definitely learn a lot about computers.
­In this article, we'll take you through the entire process of building a computer. You'll learn how to choose the parts you will use, how to buy them and how to put them all together. When you're done, you will have exactly the machine that you need. Let's get started.
The first step in building a computer is deciding what type of machine you want to build. Do you want a really inexpensive computer for the kids to use? A small, quiet machine to use as a media computer in the living room? A high-end gaming computer? Or maybe you need a powerful machine with a lot of disk space for video editing. The possibilities are endless, and the type of machine you want to build will control many of the decisions you make down the line. Therefore, it is important to know exactly what you want the machine to accomplish from the start.­
­ Let's imagine that you want to build a powerful video editing computer. You want it to have a dual-core CPU, lots of RAM and a terabyte of disk space. You also want to have FireWire connectors on the motherboard. These requirements are going to cause you to look for a motherboard that supports:
  • Dual-core CPUs (either Intel or AMD)
  • At least 4GB of high-speed RAM
  • Four (or more) SATA hard drives
  • FireWire connections (possibly in both the front and back of the case)
­ Then it all needs to go in a case with enough space to hold multiple hard disks and enough air ­flow to keep everything cool.
With any computer you build, knowing the type of machine you want to create can really help with decision-making.

Choosing a Motherboard Choosing a motherboard is the most interesting part of any building project. The reason it is so interesting is because there are hundreds of motherboards to choose from and each has its own advantages and disadvantages.
One easy way to think about motherboards is to break them up into a few categories. For example:
  • Cheap motherboards: Generally in the $50 range, these are motherboards for older CPUs. They are great for building inexpensive machines.
  • Middle-of-the-road motherboards: Ranging in price from $50 to $100, these are one step up from the cheap motherboards. In many cases you can find motherboard and CPU combos in this price range, which is another great way to build a cheap machine or an inexpensive home/office computer.
    -->

  • High-end motherboards: If you are building a powerful gaming machine or video workstation, these motherboards give you the speed you need. They range in price from $100 to $200. They handle the latest CPU chips at their highest speeds.
  • Extreme motherboards: Falling into the over-$200 range, these motherboards have special features that boost the price. For example, they might have multiple CPU sockets, extra memory slots or special cooling features.
You need to decide whether you are building a "cheap machine," a "high-end machine" or a "tricked-out super machine" and then choose your motherboard accordingly. Here are some other decisions that help narrow down your motherboard choices:
    CAPTION
    -->
  • Do you want to use an Intel or an AMD processor? Making this choice will cut the number of motherboards in half. AMD chips are often cheaper, but lots of people are die-hard Intel fans.
  • What size motherboard do you want to use? If you are trying to build a smaller computer, you may want to look at micro ATX cases. That means you will need to buy a micro ATX motherboard. Otherwise you can use a normal ATX motherboard and case. (There are also smaller motherboard form factors like mini-ITX and even nano-ITX if you want to go really small.)
  • How many USB ports do you want? If you want several, make sure the motherboard can handle it.
  • Do you need FireWire? It's nice if the motherboard handles it (although it is also possible to add a card).
  • Do you want an AGP or PCI Express graphics card? Or do you want to use a graphics card on the motherboard to keep the price and size down? If you want to go the cheapest route, make sure the motherboard includes a video card on-board (easiest way to tell is to see if there is a DVI or VGA connector on the motherboard). PCI Express is the latest/greatest thing, but if you want to re-use an AGP card you already own, that might be a reason to go with AGP.
  • Do you want to use PATA (aka IDE) or SATA hard disks? SATA is the latest thing, and the cables are much smaller.
  • What pin configuration are you using for the CPU? If you want to use the latest CPUs, make sure that your motherboard will accept them.
  • Do you want to try things like dual video cards or special high-speed RAM configurations? If so, make sure the motherboard supports it.
If you don't care about any of this stuff (or if it all sounds like gibberish to you), then you're probably interested in building a cheap machine. In that case, find an inexpensive motherboard/CPU combo kit and don't worry about all of these details.
Installing RAM and the Microprocessor But before we start building, we need to say one thing about static electricity. Most of the parts you will be handling when you assemble your computer are highly sensitive to static shocks. What that means is that if you build up static electricity on your body and a shock passes from your body to something like a CPU chip, that CPU chip is dead. You will have to buy another one.
The way you eliminate static elec­tricity is by grounding yourself. There are lots of ways to ground yourself, but probably the easiest is to wear a grounding bracelet on your wrist. Then you connect the bracelet to something grounded (like a copper pipe or the center screw on a wall outlet's face plate). By connecting yourself to ground, you eliminate the possibility of static shock.
Each combination of parts is unique. But in general, here are the basic steps you will need to follow when you assemble your machine:
­First, you'll need to unwrap the motherboard and the microprocessor chip. The chip will have one marked corner that aligns with another marked corner of its socket on the motherboard. Align the corners and drop the microprocessor into the socket. You don't need to apply any pressure - if it's aligned correctly, it should fall into place. Once you have it in, cinch it down with the lever arm.
Now, you need to install the heat sink. The CPU box will contain a manual that tells you how to do it. The heat sink will contain either a heat sink sticker or heat sink grease to use when mounting the heat sink on the CPU. Follow the instructions closely to install it. To install our heat sink, all we had to do was put it in place, cinch it down with flanges on either side and lock it with a cam. Connect the power lead for the heat sink to the motherboard.
Next, you'll install the RAM. Look on the motherboard for the slot marked "one" and firmly press the RAM module into it. It will probably take more pressure than you'd think to get the RAM into place. Each side of the module should also have a rotating arm that will lock the RAM down.
Now your motherboard is ready to put in the case.

on Dec 27, 2009 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I just did a complete new build of a computer using the Elitegroup ECS A885GM-A2 board. It powers on, shows an LED on the board, but does not beep and there is no display whatsoever. All the fans ar


usually this means that the board is powered on, but that the cpu hasn't been initialized. make sure your cpu pins are clean of thermal grease and that it is properly seated. make sure your board is compatible with the cpu and if you can get a spare (known good) cpu to boot the board with, see if it starts, and see if you can update the bios.

again, basically the issue is CPU related. at some point you may have to just RMA the processor since it is a possibility that it might be DOA. good luck!

Feb 17, 2012 | EliteGroup ECS A885GM-A2 (V1.1) AM3 AMD...

1 Answer

I have a copy of windows vista . its on my computer but i added windows7 upgrade. can i use vista on another computer i am going to build for my son?


Legally you cannot do this as the license is being used on your original computer, Sorry. You can try and see if it activates. You may be lucky. Good Luck.

Jan 21, 2012 | Foxconn A88GMV AM3 AMD 880G HDMI Micro ATX...

1 Answer

I am building a computer using the MSI 890fxa-gd70 mb, amd 1100t phenom x6, ballistix 1333mhz 4x2 gb ram, and an antec 750watt psu. Among the rest of the parts those are the ones im trying to post with,...


Hi icforet...
Nice machine...try this:
If you have a spare video card that you know is working put it in and connect your monitor to it...it will tell you if the motherboard video is good or not.
If it works then the motherboard is good
Then you can make an honest decision to send it back or keep it.
Please take time to rate me

Sep 04, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Im looking for the motherboard costs of a zt affinity laptop.


Look on e-bay I have found soe rel good dels on there for motherboards lately

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2 Answers

What pcu


Both the K9AGM2-F/L and the               K9AGM2-FIH model both take the (AMD) AM2 socket CPU just like is stated on the box.

http://global.msi.com.tw/index.php?func=searchresult&keywords=+K9AGM2

Feb 08, 2009 | MSI K9AGM2-FIH - Motherboard - micro ATX -...

1 Answer

I am planning ASUS motherboard.


Based on your previous Motherboard which i assume is the M2N-MX, it seems you are looking for a AMD board.

I would recommend the ASUS M3A78 or M3A78-T, both can be had for less then 130$ and offer support for the new Phenom II 45nm chips as well as the older 65nm and 90nm socket AM2 chips (ala the AMD 64 X2 chips).

I have used 4 or 5 of these boards for new pc builds lately and have been very impressed with them.

Hope this helps.

Jan 21, 2009 | ASUS M2N-MX Motherboard

1 Answer

Choices in building gaming computer on a budget


The best for a good gaming computer without breaking the bank would be a system using the AMD Phenom cpu. I hope this helps.

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1 Answer

I know its amd and a athon with 4 pci and 1agp slot ,buildin sound card but dont know the wiring settings for the power switch


download this you will find the information about your motherboard & chipsets .....
http://www.cpuid.com/cpuz.php


thank you
bye

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