Question about Konustart 700 (120 x 60mm) Telescope

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Need manual for konustart 900 telescope.

Need help on how to select correct eyepiece for viewing clear moonlit sky?

Posted by Anonymous on

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  • 2 Answers

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

SOURCE: instruction book and battery

Here is a retailer for this telescope--- email them to find out the proper battery--

There is a Beginner's Astronomy section also on their web site--

http://www.uk-telescopes.co.uk/Konus%20Konustart%20700%20telescope.htm

Posted on Jan 11, 2009

SOURCE: I recently acquired a Konustart

You will not find a manual for this small telescope. Even if you did it only contains assembly instructions. It will NOT teach you how to be an amateur astronomer.

Here is a free star chart you can download every month:
http://www.skymaps.com/downloads.html

Buy these two books-- Turn Left at Orion and Nightwatch.

Watch these video:
http://vimeo.com/channels/tas

and install this free planetarium software:
www.stellarium.org

Posted on Aug 28, 2010

SOURCE: I have lost the manual for konustart 700

No manuals for that imported telescope on the internet. Sorry. Try to locate a local Astronomy club. The members will help you with the telescope.

Posted on Sep 27, 2010

SOURCE: I bought a Konus Telescope

Objects in the sky are very tiny -- smaller than the tip of your finger held at arm's length.

Read my tips on my profile page-- The moon should be your first target at night, since it is llarge and easy to find.

Posted on Dec 26, 2010

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1 Answer

How many kilometers would be possible to view in land by konustart 700


That would depend on the terrain (and weather). If you're deep in a valley, you won't be able to see very far, no matter how clear the sky is. If you're on an isolated mountaintop, you could see for hundreds of kilometers if the sky is clear.

Sep 01, 2016 | Optics

1 Answer

A lens is missing


This telescope uses 1.25 inch eyepieces. Comes originally with a 20mm and a 4mm (probably cheap modified acromats) The 4mm would exceed the maximum practical magnification. 50x per inch. Many eyepieces available on Ebay and telescope vendors. If the 20mm is missing, buy a 20mm Plossl. I prefer other designs focal lengths under 12.5mm because of the eye relief. Agenaastro makes great, inexpensive ($55). I like the Sterling Plossls from Smartastronomy too Eyepieces for planetary viewing I suggest the 5.2mm for your high power or a TMB planetary (Astronomics has them for $50 Get the 5 or 6mm

Clear Skies!

Oct 04, 2012 | Bushnell NorthStar 78-8831 (525 x 76mm)...

1 Answer

How I know the red dot is working ok, is


This is a 60mm telescope not much bigger than a 10x50mm pair of binoculars. Your maximum magnification will be about 100 power. Yes I know they said 200-300 power on the box. This was a lie.

Do not use the 2x barlow. Probably be just too much magnification. Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the telescope; then try the same eyepiece with the 1.5x barlow. That is probably all the magnification the scope can handle.

Stars are always pinpoint light sources, no matter how large the telescope. They are hundreds or thousands of light years away.

The "red dot" should be pointed at exactly the same spot as what is in the eyepiece. Center a bright star in the eyepiece, then without moving the telescope... center the red dot on the star. Now you can use the red dot to POINT the telescope exactly to a sky object.

This web site may also help you:
http://www.cloudynights.com/item.php?item_id=810

Dec 28, 2009 | Konustart 700 (120 x 60mm) Telescope

1 Answer

Science Tech 262 telescope image problems.


TOO much magnification! Hate to tell you but the MAXIMUM magnification for any telescope (all things being perfect-- like optics, and sky conditions) is 50 times aperture. So max for you is about 125 power.

Normally only about 30-40 times aperture is possible. So about 90 power is your normal max magnification.

We see this every Christmas. People buy scopes that say 275 power or 500 power on the outside of the box. It's a LIE!

Even in my 8 inch LX90 I rarely go above 200 power, and only when the sky is clear and very stable. Use the eyepiece with the largest number written on it which will be your lowest magnification.

Dec 27, 2009 | Optics

1 Answer

I can't see anything but white light from my Konustart 700.


Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the telescope. DO NOT USE the 2 x barlow if you have one. Go out side during the day time and practice focusing on a distant object.

This may also help you--

http://www.deepastronomy.com/your-first-telescope.html

Dec 25, 2009 | Konustart 700 (120 x 60mm) Telescope

1 Answer

Telescope instructions


You will not find a manual for these simple telescopes-- sorry.

Jun 22, 2009 | Optics

1 Answer

Telescope Lenses


You don't need to get Vivitar brand eyepieces to get additional ones for your telescope. I'm not sure of the specifications for this particular telescope but in general they come in two barrel sizes for the eyepieces. The diameter of your eyepiece is probably 0.965" but could come in the more standard 1.25". You can measure the diameter and determine this quickly.

Once you know the diameter to shop for you can look for the focal length of the eyepiece you wish to purchase. They are rated such as 4mm, 10mm, 25mm, etc. The smaller numbers give you higher magnification. You can calculate the magnification by dividing the telescopes focal length by the eyepiece focal length. For example, let's say your telescope is has a focal length of 360mm and you have an eyepiece rated 10mm. Divide 360 by 10 and that gives you a magnification power of 36.

You can find eyepieces at many telescope dealers on the internet. Your selection will be far less if you use 0.965" eyepieces. You can purchase 0.965" to 1.25" adapters so that you can use the larger eyepieces with your telescope. However, on some telescopes the adapters will cause the new eyepiece to not come into focus.

You'll also find that eyepiece prices go all over the place. A good general purpose eyepiece is a type called the Plossl. The better eyepieces have more coatings too that allow more light to get through to your eye. You'll find these listed with terms like "fully multi-coated".

I hope this helps.

Good luck and clear skies!

-jodair

Mar 25, 2009 | Vivitar (1607225) Telescope

1 Answer

Misplaced lenses


You don't need to get Vivitar brand eyepieces to get replacement ones for your telescope. I'm not sure of the specifications for this particular telescope but in general they come in two barrel sizes for the eyepieces. The diameter of your eyepiece is probably 0.965" but could come in the more standard 1.25". You can measure the diameter and determine this quickly.

Once you know the diameter to shop for you can look for the focal length of the eyepiece you wish to purchase. They are rated such as 4mm, 10mm, 25mm, etc. The smaller numbers give you higher magnification. You can calculate the magnification by dividing the telescopes focal length by the eyepiece focal length. For example, let's say your telescope is has a focal length of 360mm and you have an eyepiece rated 10mm. Divide 360 by 10 and that gives you a magnification power of 36.

You can find eyepieces at many telescope dealers on the internet. Your selection will be far less if you use 0.965" eyepieces. You can purchase 0.965" to 1.25" adapters so that you can use the larger eyepieces with your telescope. However, on some telescopes the adapters will cause the new eyepiece to not come into focus.

You'll also find that eyepiece prices go all over the place. A good general purpose eyepiece is a type called the Plossl. The better eyepieces have more coatings too that allow more light to get through to your eye. You'll find these listed with terms like "fully multi-coated".

I hope this helps.

Good luck and clear skies!

-jodair

Feb 11, 2009 | Vivitar (1607225) Telescope

3 Answers

78-8831


If you dont have any experience with telescopes, I suggest trying it first in daytime, since daytime objects are much better for getting experience. Also, start with the lowest power eyepiece, the one with the largest lens. Start by looking towards something pretty big, like a car or a house, and it needs to be some distance away to even have a chance to get a focus. If your target is closer than about 1/4 mile, you should add the right angle eyepiece attachment to allow you to focus in on closer objects.

When you are finally set up with the low power eyepiece, and have a good big target in the daytime, start looking thru the telescope while turning the knob thru the entire range. At some point of knob turning, you should see some image appear in the eyepiece..Turn the knob slowly to focus it clearly.

And this is for the shaky tripod. If you can hang a book under the middle of the tripod, the added weight will help stabilize the telescope, and you should be able to see a little better, without so much motion at the slightest touch.

After you look at the first car or house, you can see how careful you have to be to use the telescope, and you can start to look at other objects. When you move to the higher power eyepieces, it will be even more critical in getting it both aimed and focused. If its off by just a few degrees, you wont see what you are looking for.

When you start nightime viewing, start with the largest object in the sky, the moon. Its the same process as daytime, except the eyepiece mechanism will have to be adjusted a little closer to the main body of the telescope.

Viewing planets and stars will be the ultimate test. Stars and planets are harder to see, since they are small, and hard to see unless they are in focus. When you can see those views, you have passed the telescope test. Its a matter of careful aim, and having the telescope focus set close to the point where you can see objects that are VERY FAR AWAY. If you are able to focus on the moon, you will be fairly close to being able to focus on the planets. The hardest part is actually getting the planet in the view of the telescope, in other words, aiming it.

The last item that can really mess up the view is a fogged up lens. Usually this happens in the summer when the scope has been in the air-conditioned room, and then it fogs up when taken outside. The solution for this is to let the telescope sit outside for 20 minutes, so the fogged lenses can clear. By the way, the same fogging may happen when you bring the telescope inside during the winter.

I hope this helps you eventually get a clear view of some amazing views in the sky. Your final exam is to take a look at the moon, the rings of Saturn, and the moons of Jupiter, some time in the near future. Have Fun!

Dec 26, 2007 | Bushnell NorthStar 78-8831 (525 x 76mm)...

1 Answer

Cannot see an image through the lens


I bought one of these telescopes, and had trouble at first, but finally got some decent results. If you dont have any experience with telescopes, I suggest trying it first in daytime, since daytime objects are much better for getting experience. Also, start with the lowest power eyepiece, the 12mm 50x, the one with the largest lens. Start by looking towards something pretty big, like a car or a house, and it needs to be some distance away to even have a chance to get a focus. If your target is closer than about 1/4 mile, you should add the right angle eyepiece attachment to allow you to focus in on closer objects.

When you are finally set up with the low power eyepiece, and have a good big target in the daytime, start looking thru the telescope while turning the knob thru the entire range. At some point of knob turning, you should see some image appear in the eyepiece..Turn the knob slowly to focus it clearly.

And this is for the shaky tripod. If you can hang a book under the middle of the tripod, the added weight will help stabilize the telescope, and you should be able to see a little better, without so much motion at the slightest touch.

After you look at the first car or house, you can start to see how careful you have to be to use the telescope, and you can start to look at other objects. When you move to the higher power 100x eyepiece, it will be even more critical in getting it both aimed and focused. If its off by just a few degrees, you wont see what you are looking for.

When you start nightime viewing, start with the largest object in the sky, the moon. Its the same process as daytime, except the eyepiece mechanism will have to be adjusted a little closer to the main body of the telescope.

Viewing planets and stars will be the ultimate test. Stars and planets are harder to see, since they are small, and hard to see unless they are in focus. When you can see those views, you have passed the telescope test. Its a matter of careful aim, and having the telescope focus set close to the point where you can see objects that are VERY FAR AWAY. If you are able to focus on the moon, you will be fairly close to being able to focus on the planets. The hardest part is actually getting the planet in the view of the telescope, in other words, aiming it.

The last item that can really mess up the view is a fogged up lens. Usually this happens in the summer when the scope has been in the air-conditioned room, and then it fogs up when taken outside. The solution for this is to let the telescope sit outside for 20 minutes, so the fogged lenses can clear. By the way, the same fogging may happen when you bring the telescope inside during the winter.

I hope this helps you eventually get a clear view of some amazing views in the sky. Your final exam is to take a look at the moon, the rings of Saturn, and the moons of Jupiter, some time in the near future. Have Fun!

Nov 14, 2007 | Vivitar (1607225) Telescope

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