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Loud buzzing when amp connects to guitar

I received an electric guitar pack for Christmas that included the amp and the cord to connect the guitar to the amp. When I plug in the amp, there is nothing unusual. But when the guitar is plugged in, a loud buzzing sound emits. I have replaced the amp and that has not helped. When the cord is unplugged from the guitar, the buzzing noise continues whether the cord is touching skin, clothing, etc. It does not stop for a few seconds. It is not the normal buzz of an amp, it is much louder. Do I need a new cord or is there a way to fix this that won't have me trekking to the store again?

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Let me get this right... it buzzes with any amp..so the amp is not it. So we are left with the guitar or the cord. I didn't see where you replaced the cord. Don't get a cheap one. Make sure it is a guitar cord. Try to not go beyond 18 feet in length. They will hum plugged in to an amp without a guitar plugged in the other end. Electrical interference, bad outlet, poor wiring could be and issue. Try another outlet in the other side of house not on the same circuit. Try the free things before you start buying. Take your cord and guitar to the music store and try and amp out. You will find your answer. My bet is on the cord.

Posted on Oct 15, 2014

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You need a 3.5 cable it is not fitting right in you guitar it wiggles to much

Posted on Apr 07, 2012

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Is there a loose connection anywhere?

Posted on Jan 03, 2009

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The buzzing noise could be caused by a grould feedback loop. This occures when the amp is plugged into one power socket and the guitar's amp is plugged into a drifferent power socket.
Try to use a power board, plug in all your devices into this power board and plug the power board into a power socket.

Posted on Jan 03, 2009

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