Question about JVC THC6 Home Theater System 5-Disc Changer System

1 Answer

My JVCTHC 9 Power subwoofer will not power up.

I have checked the power supply from the mains.
I have installed a new systems cable
I have checked the fuse in the back of the subwoofer
I still can't get it to power up ?

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  • alistair394 Jan 03, 2009

    Not sure what you mean by remote cable



  • DAVID BOURBONNIERE Feb 03, 2009

    Mine have the same problem...it just stops working!

    No power light on subwoofer but the main DVD still power up.

    You have any solution?

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1 Answer

  • Level 1:

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Assuming that you are using an amp have you checked the remote cable is giving the right voltage?

Posted on Jan 03, 2009

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The flat ribbon cable is the data cable, so no.

Power is by a separate lead which supplies 5 volts or 12 volts via the Power Supply Unit.

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There is no 3.3VDC power supply to main system control section circuit. Check and replace the damaged component/s at this section. If you wish to get some details; check the site linked here. Pull up older posts. Surf the site with patience. http://electronicshelponline.blogspot.com/
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Subwoofer not working


The subwoofer is normally the main power supply for the other speakers. When setting up the system, there is a set up guide which allows you to control the power supplied to each speaker. You may have inadvertently set the subwoofer to have 0 output.

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Xerox 4150 workcenter says fuser module needs to warm up. This appears usually first thing in morning. I have to power off then on to stop this from showing on the screen. also, it wont print until after I...


1. Switch off the machine, then switch on the machine.
2. Enter dC330 code 10-100 to heat the fuser to 180 degrees. Enter codes 10-200 (centre
thermistor) and 10-210 (front thermistor) to verify the condition of the thermistors.
3. Enter code 10-300 to check power supply unit 2. If necessary, install a new power supply
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4. Switch off the machine. Remove the fuser assembly. Check that the thermistors, PL 10.25
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thermistors. Install new components as necessary, PL 10.25.
5. Check for continuity between the two pins on the fuser assembly connector, PL 10.25
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NOTE: A cold fuser has a resistance of approximately 11.5 ohms (220V/240V) or 2 ohms
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6. Check that there is continuity through the fuser heater and across the over temperature
cut-out.
7. Check the wiring between the fuser connector, PL 4.15 Item 20 and CON3, CON8 and
CON9 on Power Supply Unit 2. If necessary, install a new fuser connector, PL 4.15 Item
20.
8. Check the wiring between CON4 on Power Supply Unit 2 and CN7 on the Main PWB.
9. Install new components as necessary:
• Fuser assembly, PL 10.25 Item 1.
• HVPS, PL 1.10 Item 2.
10. Perform the OF5 Main PWB Check RAP.
4250/4260 Checkout
NOTE: The main PWB has test points. The location of the test points is shown on the Main
PWB PJ location illustration.
Refer to Wiring Diagram 17, Wiring Diagram 18 and Wiring Diagram 21. Perform the following:
1. Switch off the machine, then switch on the machine.
2. Enter dC330 code 10-100 to heat the fuser to 180 degrees. Enter codes 10-200 (centre
thermistor) and 10-210 (front thermistor) to verify the condition of the thermistors.
3. Enter code 10-300 to check power supply unit 2. If necessary, install a new power supply
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4. Switch off the machine. Remove the fuser assembly. Check that the thermistors, PL 10.28
Item 9 are clean and in good contact with the fuser heat roller. Check the wiring to the
thermistor assembly. Check the wiring to the NC thermistor, PL 10.28 Item 19. Install new
components as necessary, PL 10.28.
5. Check for continuity between the three pins on the fuser assembly connector, PL 10.28
Item 8.
NOTE: A cold fuser has a resistance of approximately 11.5 ohms (220V/240V) or 2 ohms
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6. Check that there is continuity through the fuser heat lamps and across the over temperature
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7. Check the wiring between the fuser connector, PL 4.15 Item 20 and CN5 on the Main
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8. Check the wiring between CON1 on Power Supply Unit 2 and CN7 on the Main PWB.
9. Install new components as necessary:
• Fuser assembly, PL 10.28 Item 1.
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10. Perform the OF5 Main PWB Check RAP

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Missing a cable from main unit to sub woofer. where can i buy one


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1 Answer

After a power outage I have a loud hum.


Hi, The Ground Rules Of all the annoyances that can afflict any audio/video home theater or even a simple stereo installation, the notorious "ground loop" may well be the most difficult and persistent one to track down and eliminate. A "ground loop" is caused by the difference in electrical potential at different grounding points in an audio/video system. (All the grounds in an A/V system should ideally be at "0" potential.) A ground loop typically adds a loud low-frequency hum or buzz as soon as you plug in any of various audio or video components, including subwoofers, cable-TV outboard boxes, satellite-TV feeds, TV displays, amplifiers, A/V receivers or turntables. The buzz/hum is a byproduct of the multiple power supply cables and a ground voltage differential within your system and its network of interconnecting cables.

Here are some methods to help you get rid of ground loops. Try these first and don't waste money on a power "conditioner" which, in most cases, won't help. (There is no need to "condition" the AC power for your system. Your receiver or amplifier already has a power supply with its own filters and transformers. No further filtering is normally required.)

If you get your system up and running and hear an audible buzz or hum, the first culprit to look at is either the powered subwoofer or your cable-TV or satellite-box feed at the entry point to your system.

First, the subwoofer: unplug the coaxial cable that connects to your powered subwoofer to see if the ground-loop hum disappears. If it does, it's likely coming in through your cable/satellite TV feed.

Reconnect your subwoofer's coaxial cable from the subwoofer input to your receiver's subwoofer output and disconnect the cable-TV feed (or satellite feed) from your outboard set-top cable box or satellite tuner. Be sure and disconnect the cable before any splitters. Now see if the hum/buzz from your subwoofer stops.

If that eliminates the hum, you can install one of these inexpensive in-line ground isolators from Parts Express or Bass Home. Note that these transformer-based ground isolators will work fine with analog cable-TV feeds, but depending on their design they may interfere with or block reception of HDTV signals via a digital cable or satellite dish feed.

Install the ground isolator between the cable-TV feed and the input of your outboard cable-TV box or satellite tuner (or the TV display's antenna or cable input if you have a set with a built-in TV tuner or a cable-card ready set). In many cases, the ground isolator will "break" the loop and remove the annoying hum or buzz by isolating the TV-cable ground.

If a hum remains with the TV cable completely disconnected from your system, or you don't want to risk degrading reception of HD signals from a cable or satellite system, then you may have to add a ground isolator like this Radio Shack Model 270-054 between the line-level coaxial subwoofer cable from your A/V receiver and the line-level input jack on your powered subwoofer.

In all cases, if your subwoofer has a ground-lift screw like some of Axiom's subwoofers, try first removing the screw (or replacing it) to see if it increases or eliminates the hum. It may or may not make a difference.

If you do not have easy access to the aforementioned ground isolators, here are a few more tips:

Try plugging the subwoofer into a different AC outlet in the room, one that isn't supplying power to your components (A/V receiver, TV, cable box, etc.). That might fix it.

Try reversing the AC plug for your A/V receiver or the powered subwoofer. If it's a 3-wire plug or a polarized plug, which has one prong wider than the other, you won't be able to reverse the plug. For safety, do not use a "cheater plug" to bypass the 3-wire plug.

With the power OFF, reverse the AC plugs one by one of any other components that have a standard 2-prong AC plug that isn't polarized. Each time you reverse a plug, turn on the system with the attached component and your subwoofer and see if the hum disappears. In some cases, reversing one or more plugs will eliminate the hum.

If you have a turntable, try connecting a separate ground wire to a chassis screw on your preamp or receiver and see if the hum disappears. If you already have a turntable ground wire, try removing it from the preamp. One or the other may eliminate the hum.

Finally, here is another solution that worked well for a member of our message boards who decided to discard his ground-loop isolator on his subwoofer: "I took off the ground-loop isolator I'd been using and connected a plain 14-gauge wire to chassis screws on the sub and the receiver then powered everything on. Although hum was still there, it was far lower than before. Next I unscrewed the ground-loop screw on the back of the sub and that took care of the hum completely."

Almost certainly sounds like an earth loop to me, but can be caused by a poorly made transformer or phase shifts on the mains supply. Visit some power conditioner web-sites like Isotek or Isol-8 (or google "earth loop") where there's plenty of advice on how to reduce/eliminate earth loops and other causes of mains-induced hum (transformer problems etc).

Hum on the speakers usually indicates that there is a DC voltage on the speaker line. DC voltage on the output lines would be caused by a shorted output transistor.


Have a nice day...

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their is a cable from the acousimas (subwoofer) to the dvd plaver, the power supply is included in this cable
otherwise check site http://www.bose.com/pdf/customer_service/owners/og_321_2.pdf

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