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Over wind need to unwind this watch

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There's no such thing as over winding if the watch as stopped working it means there is a problem elsewhere, like the balance wheel is broke or there's dirt in the movement, try shaking it in a rotary direction backwards and forwards,see if you can hear a ticking sound, if not go to repair shop to get it fixed

Posted on Oct 25, 2012

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"Self-winding" Automatic mechanical watches that don't run.


Many questions are posted about watches that don't run or just run for a few seconds or minutes. If it's a quartz/digital watch you need to have the battery replaced. If it's a mechanical watch - even a high end "perpetual" watch like a Rolex, you'll need to manually wind it. Self-winding, or automatic, watches have a rotor in the case that spins as your arm/wrist moves throughout the day. The motion of the rotor winds the watch. When the watch is left unworn for a day or you spend your day just reading a book or otherwise remain inactive, the watch runs down. To restart it and provide a power reserve, simply wind the watch manually by turning the crown clockwise about 40 turns. It should run fine as long as you stay active. If you don't wear the watch everyday and don't want to have to wind and reset it every time you put it on, you can buy a watch winder to keep it moving. You can find them for under $100 on ebay for basic models and for more money you will see ones that wind multiple watches and have nice decorative cases.

on Apr 15, 2010 | Watches

1 Answer

Watch stopped working


Try winding it by hand. If it will wind manually and works then the problem is the 'winding mechanism' If it won't wind by hand then you need a watchmaker. Find one that is certified if possible, they are the most schooled.

Oct 08, 2012 | Fossil Ansel - ME3022 Analog Watches : One...

1 Answer

I have wound muy omega speedmaster automatic to tightly at the bezel and it has stopped working. Can you tell me if there is something inside that can be released tostart it again?


There's a misconception that mechanical watches can be "overwound." Mainsprings in old watches can indeed set in place and freeze up if they are wound tightly and not permitted to unwind, but the steel used in modern mainsprings used in the past 50 years or so is an alloy that's much less likely to bind up compared to 19th century pocket watches. In addition, the winding mechanism in an automatic (aka, self-winding) watch is designed to slip once the spring has been fully wound so that the rotor and winding parts aren't damaged by suddenly binding up. In a manual wind watch, once the mainspring is fully wound, it's simply not possible to wind the watch further unless the mainspring snaps or comes loose from its anchoring--in which case, you'd be able to wind the watch forever without ever storing power in the mainspring to drive the movement. While it is possible for a watchmaker to open your watch and release tension on the mainspring, it's overwhelmingly likely that something entirely different is keeping your watch from ticking and keeping time.

Mechanical watches generally stop running for two reasons: (1) lack of power to the movement; or (2) something in the movement that is preventing the movement from running. If your mainspring is fully wound, you have power to drive the movement. It's time to think about what could be causing #2.

Problems in the movement are usually caused by dust or dirt that preventing a delicate movement part from working properly (e.g., dirt at the pivots can freeze up a gear, stopping a movement). However, it's also possible to have a mechanical failure, such as a bent tooth on a gear in the train. A further possibility is so-called "overbanking," which some believe is the origin of the myth of overwinding. A mechanical watch's balance assembly drives a tiny little forked lever back and forth to control the escapement and the rate at which the watch keeps time. If the watch receives a physical shock or if the parts are worn, it's possible for this tiny lever to get bumped out of its tiny pivot and jammed in place. When that happens, the watch will stop, even though a superficial check will seem to indicate that the balance is still moving freely. At the same time, because the watch isn't ticking, the mainspring isn't unwinding, and so the watch cannot be wound further.

In my experience, watches usually stop running due to dirt at the pivots or on one or more gear teeth. I generally see overbanking in older watches or mechanical watches that have been less precisely made and not routinely cleaned over their working lives--though I have seen it also occur in a few newer watches that were dropped. Better designed watches--and I would include Omega in this category--have escapement levers with built-in guards to make it more difficult for them to overbank.

As for how dirt gets into a watch that's supposed to be water-resistant and generally sealed against exactly that problem--well, as odd as it sounds, watches "breathe," and this process draws in dust and dirt over time. Worn against the body, a watch warms up and expands the air inside it, pushing some of it out of the case; upon cooling, some air is drawn back into the case. This process is obviously reduced in watches designed with a significant degree of water resistance (aka 50 meters or more), but the process is accelerated when you pull the stem out to set the time or even wind the watch via the stem--there's some degree of air gap between the stem and the stem tube, or else it wouldn't be possible to turn the stem. This microscopic dust--in minute quantities--mixes with the lubricating oils inside a mechanical watch and increase the friction in some of the key pivots. Over time, the combination of naturally solidifying oils that are thickening and a minute amount of dust can turn lubricating oil into glue. The watch cleaning process flushes the old oil and accumulated dirt from the pivot bushings so that fresh, uncontaminated oil can be used to re-lubricate these key gear axles.

Bottom line: if your mechanical watch has stopped working, it's much more likely that something is interrupting the intricate gears in the watch movement rather than a problem with the mainspring. A competent watchmaker or watch repair technician should be able to identify the problem relatively quickly and give you a definitive answer as to the true cause of--and cost to fix--your watch.

Jun 11, 2011 | Watches

1 Answer

Have old Seth Thomas Metronome ,only key turn about 1/4 turn.Is that normal for vintage one.


It is not normal. Metronome should wind almost the same as a clock. The cause for this 1/4 turn of a winder is that the driving spring do not unwind completely. That means there are mechanical or oiling issues. Show your metronome to any clock repairer (not the watch repairer) and he/she should be able to fix that.

Feb 27, 2011 | Watches

1 Answer

I have an early 1900 clock that I have to wind. I have noticed my clock stops frequently. I go to wind it and it is tight to wind so instead of over winding I tip the clock to start the ticking and the...


You can not unwind the clock yourself, because this requires proper clock makers tools and skills as well. Clock is stopping because it has not been serviced for a long time and the oil in clock has collected dust particles and getting sticky. This does not let the spring unwind freely and is a problem for all cogs and moving parts. Find your nearest clock repair shgop and ask for cleaning, oiling and adjusting. BE AWARE: If you are gonna try to unwind it yourself, you will damage the clock's movement, but most important - you can even brake or loose your fingers, as the clock spring is under unbelievable tension and once released, it uncoils lightning fast and is sharp as a razor.

Oct 28, 2010 | Seth Thomas Watches

1 Answer

I have a navitimer world which i bought second hand a couple of months ago, but it seems to be losing time, it loses a minute or 2 a day, and every few days i need to reset the time,i wear it all day and...


Without seeing the inside works (movement) of your new (to you) watch and its parts, it's impossible to tell exactly what is going on, but no need to worry, as that's what competent watchmakers are for. Probably just needs a new spring, which wear over time due to many factors, including temperature, shock and corrosion. Basically, when you wind up any mechanical watch (whether automatic or hand-wound, regardless of age), you're tightening the spring which in turn is what powers up the watch (powering up the gears as it returns to its original position--i.e., unwinds, accuracy dependent thus on the spring among other factors). Sounds to me like it just needs a routine service, mechanical watches being no different than are automobiles, which require regular service as well. In the case of a watch, this will entail a cleaning, fresh oil and regulation, with old springs often simply swapped out for a new ones at that time by a watchmaker; routine services are a standard procedure which can be performed by any competent independent watchmaker, and don't cost a lot either. Most watch manufacturers recommend such service be carried out every 5 years or so, and while some can go longer (especially if not worn daily, same as a car when it comes to oil changes/service intervals), it's important to remember to service your mechanical time pieces which, if you do, will provide you with decades of reliable time keeping. All the best.

Sep 05, 2010 | Breitling Navitimer World 715 A24322 Watch

1 Answer

Do I need to wind a Fila Chronograph Automatic Watch


Under normal use winding an automatic watch is not needed.

If it has been left unused for more than about 3 days, then it will stop. On some automatic watches you can wind them but if yours does not allow this, then, holding it level (face up), swing it gently from side to side for a few minutes. This should wind the watch and after this normal use should be sufficient to keep it wound.

Aug 01, 2010 | Bulova Watch

1 Answer

Is it good to change watch movement to a battery ?Watch was overwound.


Hi,

There is no such things as over winding a watch. If it is not an automatic watch then the watch will wind until it stops. If the watch does not run then something else is wrong.

If the watch is an automatic then about 30 winds will fully wind the watch. But, you can continue to wind the watch forever. It will never stop winding. Again, if it does not run after being wound there is something else wrong.

To fix your watch you need to have a qualified watchmaker repair it for you.

Hope this helps,

Ken
www.yellowstonewatch.com

Apr 08, 2010 | Kenneth Cole KC1104 Wrist Watch

1 Answer

The second hand on my TAG automatic jumps in 4 second intervals.


This is very strange situation, as usually this occurs in quartz watches with integrated EOL (End Of Life) only and that is a signal for time to change battery.
In your case I can see the only reason- seconds hand somehow became loose and you need to refit it.
Find your nearest watchmaker and ask to do the job. It's not a big deal, but requires professional skill.

Jan 03, 2009 | Tag Heuer 2000 Classic WK1113.BA0311 Wrist...

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