Question about Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera

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The aperture value setting different than the result

I set the aperture value before capturing the picture, after it's done i check the picture info and the aperture value had change..
i wonder why..
thank you

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  • 21 Answers

Sound like the aperture is set to auto

Posted on Jan 03, 2009

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1 Answer

When taking pictures in bright light the results are pictures washed out with vertical lines from the top almost like stalagmites.


The pictures are over-exposed. if shooting manual, use a smaller aperture and/or a higher shutter speed. If in one of the automatic modes, then reduce ISO value to 100 or 200. Also check your white balance setting.

Mar 06, 2016 | Cameras

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How do I change the aperture when my camera is in manual mode


You have to hold down the exposure compensation button at the same time as turning the control dial.
The values appear on the control panel screen.

I found this on page 33 of the manual...
Set the mode dial to M and turn the control dial to set the value.
• To set the shutter speed: Turn the control dial.
To set the aperture value:Turn the control dial while holding down the
[+-](exposure compensation) button.

The exposure level indicator appears on the control panel screen, showing the difference (ranging from -3 EV to +3 EV) between the exposure value calculated by the currently selected aperture
and shutter speed compared to the exposure value considered optimum by the camera.

Oct 13, 2014 | Olympus EVOLT E-410 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Underexposed images


I hope you received some help already by this time. However, just for other readers shake, your issues has to do with your camera's settings. There are two things that initially determine the quality of pictures and these are:
1. Exposure and
2.Shutter speed

I believe your pictures are dark because settings on your camera feature a combination of fast shutter-speed with a lower value of aperture. Try adjusting those or shoot with a pre-programmed mode under different lighting conditions.

Mar 11, 2014 | Canon PowerShot S51S Digital Camera

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Bought cheap extention tubes, now camera wont recognize the lens. How do I use them


Set the exposure mode to "M" (Manual). You'll have to set both the aperture and shutter speed yourself.

You'll also get no exposure assistance from the camera's light meter. You can review the picture after taking one and/or use the histogram to tune the exposure.

Sep 30, 2013 | Nikon D5000 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Manual that came with camera does not explain symbols for setting the mode. Amazing! What do M, A,S,P, N and SP 1 and SP2 stand for? the only things I understand are Auto and Panorama.


M stands for 'Manual mode'. This is the mode wherein you set your shutter speed and aperture setting. A stands for 'Aperture Priority'. This is the mode where you set the aperture or opening of the lens and the camera sets the shutter speed. The lower the aperture number setting, the more light penetrates the lens, a faster shutter speed is needed. This setting is usually used for portrait scenarios. S stands for 'Shutter priority'. This is the mode where you set the shutter speed and the camera sets the aperture. The higher shutter speed number, the lower aperture number is set by the camera to accommodate more light into the lens. This setting is usually used for capturing moving objects like cars. P stands for 'Program Mode'. The camera takes care of different settings except for the aperture and the shutter speed. You get to choose combinations of aperture and shutter speed settings that will not change the exposure of your scene. This is like a combined 'A' and 'S' mode with different combinations. N stands for 'Natural Light'. The camera tries to make use of available light. This is ideal for indoor use when flash is prohibited or when you just want to capture the ambiance of the scene. The camera sets a high sensitivity setting to handle low light conditions. The drawback of this would be grainier pictures. SP1 and SP2 stand for Scene Position 1 and 2. This is like a memory setting for most commonly used scene settings. For example, you can assign SP1 for landscape mode scene and SP2 for night mode scene. You have 13 scenes to choose from in your camera, 2 of which you can assign in SP1 or SP2. The default setting for SP1 is Portrait mode and for SP2, it is Landscape mode.
Hope this helps.

Apr 15, 2011 | Fuji FinePix S1000FD Digital Camera

1 Answer

Best settings to capture fireworks?


It's a little difficult with this camera since the slowest shutter speed is 3 secs. You need to have the timing right to get the best result:
Set mode dial to M, Select shutter speed with 4-way switch up and down : 3 secs. Now select Aperture: Hold down +/- button and select aperture with the same 4-way button, up and down. Choose F8, which is the smallest opening. You need to have the camera on a tripod when taking the picture. If the picture gets to dark, adjust the aperture. If it gets to light, you adjust the shutter speed, making the timing even more difficult.

Jul 05, 2010 | Fuji FinePix E550 Digital Camera

5 Answers

Blue tint when shooting aperture priority


Hello, First of all let's explain what aperture priority does in terms of electronics and mechanical/optical changes in the way the camera takes photos. Unlike most point and shot digital cameras, your one has variable aperture range. Aperture is related to your camera lens. Their main function will be to collect light and direct it to the camera's sensor. The aperture of a lens is the diameter of the lens opening and is usually controlled by an iris.The larger the diameter of the aperture, the more light reaches the image sensor. Aperture is expressed as "F-stop", for example F2.8 or f/2.8. The smaller the F-stop number (or f/value) the larger the lens opening (aperture). This means that when you're using aperture priority or large aperture values (a smaller f/value) your image sensor (ccd or cmos) will tend to receive more light or slightly overexpose itself. Most simple digital cameras, the point and shot ones, have a fixed aperture, the lens are fixed and that's set to a so believed "optimum" range in order to produce best pictures when using automatic settings. SLR or semi SLR digital camera's woun't achieve best performances when using them on automatic settings, they aren't designed in the same way as the simple camera's. These camera's will tend to either overexpose, or have lighting/colour problems or achieve blurry images when using automatic settings. Any SLR or semi SLR camera user will be required to understand the way photography (electronic photography) works in order to achieve the best performances with it's camera. For your example, I guess the shots have a blue tint on them when you're using natural sun light in your photos, or in room pictures are illuminated by natural sun light. This is the first sign of overexpure, and the best way to reduce it and it's efects is to manually set the aperture range. Note that higher values will reduce the light that passes to the sensor, so you will want to experiment a little with those in order to achieve the best performance. When you take photos in light environments, bright sunny days or in rooms that contain many white surfaces or walls (these reflect the light pretty much and can overexpose the camera even if it doesn't look that bright when you look at them with your own eyes) you may want to use larger aperture value in order to have little light come to the sensor. Look for the highest values in aperture (in your menu) for example F8 or F16. If the pictures come out to dark or miss some details, you may want to use larger apertures (smaller numbers). Try these tests in order to check if your camera's problem can be solved this way. If not please reply back and we will look on the hardware - firmware side of the problem. Regarding aperture a quick recap :) A large aperture allows more light to reach the sensor. It's good when taking portret pictures and also achieves that nice blurry background surrounding your main subject in the picture. It's defined by smaller numbers (for example F1.8 or F1.2 or smaller). A small aperture allows little light to reach the sensor. It's good to take pictures in bright sun light. It's defined by larger numers (for example F16 or F22 or larger). Hope this helps, Bogdan.

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3 Answers

Difference between Auto Picture/Program Mode


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Sep 08, 2005 | Pentax *ist DS Digital Camera

1 Answer

Landscape picture


You don't normally want to focus on infinity for landscape shots. Auto focus on mid distance between you and infinity [horizon or most distant object] while half holding down shutter button re compose your pic and shoot. Depth of field will help to ensure that everything is in focus larger F stop more depth of field. f2.8 minimum depth of field. This is digital, film is cheap :-) Using the same focus spot, take one shot at each aperture and decide which aperture gives the desired results in terms of sharpness, I think you will find that will be around f4. Then try different focusing spot [closer or further away] to adjust how much between you and infinity is in focus depending on the results YOU wish to achieve.

Sep 06, 2005 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ2 Digital Camera

1 Answer

The best situation to use each of the shooting modes


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