Question about HP (122226-001) Fan Controllers

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Chipset overheating graphic processor is overheating, I want to manage cooling fan from temperature sensor, placed on graphic card

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  • Anonymous Jan 17, 2009

    hi my name is sam , i have a mother board chipset is overheating what cane i do thank you

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Just do this get a high output fan that will fit in the case set it close as functionally possible and wire the fan to your drive power connectors(Use a fan connector cable if you got one or alot of good tape) some times you got say fu8k the factory fan and its special senors and **** you won't the thing to stay cool right well?!! Then just keep it cool i hope you have learn something today have a nice day (compaqsiget over and out)

Posted on Jan 06, 2009

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Display problem on laptop


Suggested problem with the graphics chipset

Usually the problem is the Mounting of the graphics chipset, TO motherboard.

http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/ca/en/sm/WF06b/321957-321957-64295-3955552-3955552-4145198-4172654.html?dnr=1

ATI Mobility Radeon HD 530v
NOT, a graphics card as indicated by HP Support specifications;
It is a graphics chipset soldered to the motherboard, with a BGA surface mount,

http://www.ebay.com/itm/HP-ProBook-4510S-4710S-4411S-Intel-Motherboard-574508-001-TESTED-/230980393175?pt=Motherboards&hash=item35c78118d7

The white rectangular object towards the Left, with multiple holes in it, and also a small square hole in the center; is the Processor (CPU) socket.

To right of it is the graphics chipset.
Here you see the cooling system, for the Probook 4520S Notebook PC,

http://www.ebay.com/itm/HP-ProBook-4520S-4525S-4720S-CPU-Fan-with-Heatsink-P-N-598677-001-/281010572002?pt=US_CPU_Fans_Heatsinks&hash=item416d890ae2

Fan Assembly is at the bottom, in the D-shaped shroud.
Cooling Tube comes from the top, and curves around to the Left.
The small metal plate attached to the Cooling Tube, at the far left with 4 mounting screws; sits on the CPU (Processor)

Come to the right, and the small metal plate immediately above the Cooling Tube; sits on the graphics chipset. (2 screws)

This is NOT a Radeon HD530v, but shows a general example of the graphics chipset,

http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-ATI-Mobility-Radeon-X600-216PDAGA23F-BGA-Chipset-free-shipping-/271200572100?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f24d052c4

Does not have ATI on it. There are code numbers.

As stated, the graphics chipset is soldered directly to the motherboard, with a BGA surface mount.
Ball Grid Array.
It is NOT a separate graphics card, you just unplug to replace.

To explain the BGA surface mount, compare to an older Intel Pentium 4 processor; that uses a Socket 478 processor socket;

The bottom of the Processor has contact pins. 478 of 'em.
The CPU (Processor) socket, has 478 matching socket holes,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socket_478

With a BGA surface mount, there are no contact pins, nor matching socket holes.
The bottom of the graphics chipset has Solder Balls, and the motherboard has matching Copper Pads.

The graphics chipset is lowered in place over the motherboard, with the Solder Balls lining up with the matching Copper Pads.
Heat is then applied at a SPECIFIC temperature, and LENGTH of time.
This action melts the Solder Balls, and solders the graphics chipset TO the Copper Pads. Which in turn solders the graphics chipset TO the motherboard.

Due to inadequate cooling, the graphics chipset can overheat.
Repeated overheating, can cause the solder joints (connections) that were made, to partially melt.
Then when the graphics chipset cools down, such as when the laptop is turned off; the solder joints re-solidify.

This can cause Cold Solder Joints.
Creating a poor contact of graphics chipset to motherboard.

A specialized shop with an SMD/BGA Rework Station, is used to reflow the graphics chipset to the motherboard.
View this short video, and see more info about Solder Balls, Copper Pads, and the BGA surface mount technology,

http://ersa.com/art-ir-pl-650-346-1472.html

Scroll down, click on the Red -
Take a few minutes to view the IR 650 demo video

Or replace the motherboard.

Regards,
joecoolvette

May 19, 2013 | HEWLETT-PACKARD HP ProBook 4520s Notebook

1 Answer

Dell laptop inspiron m5010 screen shows 3 images across - external shows the same


This = Not good

Graphics chipset problem.

A) Graphics chipset is overheating.

1) Suggest clean inside of laptop out,

2) Apply new Thermal Paste to CPU, (Processor), and also carefully peel off the Thermal Pad on graphics chipset, and throw away.

Suggest this time instead of using a Thermal Pad again, (Shudder), use a piece of copper sheet that is the correct thickness, and surface area.

Then use Thermal Paste on top if the graphics chipset, and top of copper sheet; before reinstalling Cooling Tube/Heatsink combo.


B) Graphics chipset has overheated, or actually has been overheating; and has now caused a poor contact of graphics chipset; TO motherboard.

Allow me to expand on A and B above.........

First of all.........do I think the graphics chipset is bad?
No sir, I do not.
Proof is that you ARE getting graphics on the LCD screen.
Three images, or not.
(Internal monitor of laptop, OR external monitor)

Referring back to A)

The CPU (Processor) and the graphics chipset, are the two hardware components that give off the MOST heat.

If the laptop is dirty inside, the cooling capacity of the cooling system; has dropped tremendously.

This allows the CPU, and the graphics chipset (GPU), to overheat.
Overheating graphics chipset will do all kinds of strange things.
(Graphically)

What also transpires, is the Thermal Paste dries up.
Looses it's thermal conductivity properties.
A Thermal Pad is a material that is impregnated with Thermal Paste, so you can see how this equates.
It's impregnated Thermal Paste also dries up.

To regress;
The top of a Processor (CPU), and the bottom of the metal plate of the Cooling Tube, that sits on it; are not perfectly smooth.

A magnified view would detail, 'Ridges, Valleys, and Pitholes'.
When the two parts are mated together, Air Pockets are formed.
Air in this case is an Insulator. Not a Conductor.

Thermal Paste fills the above imperfections, and is an Excellent conductor of heat.

Moving on.........

A Thermal Pad is J-U-N-K!
Carefully peel off, and fly it at the cat. (NO, don't! lol!)

Using a small piece of copper sheet, that is the correct thickness; (And width/length), will allow more surface area for cooling. Becomes more passive surface area for cooling.

(The Fan Assembly does not blo-w air on the graphics chipset. More on that in a moment. Therefore it would not be Dynamic cooling. It is Passive cooling )

Let's take a look at the cooling system for the Dell Inspiron M5010, and I feel it will help explain better........

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Dell-OEM-Inspiron-M5010-CPU-Heatsink-K28PW-Fan-DFB451005M20T-AMD-Warranty-/370766328394?pt=US_CPU_Fans_Heatsinks&hash=item565365324a

Scroll down to the three large photos.
The top, or first photo; shows a Top view.
The next photo down shows a Bottom view.
The photo below it shows a detailed view of the finned Heatsink.

Looking at the first photo, or can be said - Top View.....
The black Fan Assembly is at the top.

Note the rectangular area to the Right, of the black Fan Assembly.
This is the Heatsink.

Coming down from it is the curved copper Cooling Tube.
Note the small rectangular copper metal plate, then at the bottom of the Cooling Tube; note the V-shaped Aluminum metal plate.
(V-shape that goes to an odd shape)

Cooling Tube:
Sightly flattened copper tube, sealed on both ends; and filled with Nitrogen.

Has a small rectangular copper metal plate, that sits on the graphics chipset.
Also has an Aluminum metal plate (V-shaped), that sits on the CPU.
(Processor)

Heatsink:
Small piece of aluminum strip, that has Tall, Thin, fins protruding from it, and is rectangular in shape.

Fan Assembly:
Small multi-bladed fan, in a D-shaped shroud.

Working principle:
Heat is absorbed from the Processor, and graphics chipset, by their two respective metal plates.
Then the Cooling Tube absorbs heat from the plates.

The Cooling Tube then transfers the heat to the finned Heatsink.
The Heatsink absorbs the heat, then radiates it away with it's tall, thin, fins.
Air flow from the Fan Assembly, helps carry heat away from the Heatsink's fins.

That small rectangular piece of copper plate, that sits on the graphics chipset; it TOO SMALL in surface area.
The surface area needs to be increased.

This would be accomplished by ADDING a small piece of copper sheet, that is larger in surface area; and is of the correct thickness.
(Approximately 1/16th of an Inch thick, or 2mm)

Using this video to help explain adding more surface area,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JEpnqhRYGLw

Posted for added surface area, NOT re-flowing graphics chipset, BGA surface mount.
Specifically go to -> 08:38

You can get a small piece of copper sheet, from a hobby store.
Thermal Paste is used on TOP of the graphics chipset, AND on top of the small copper piece of metal. Then the Cooling Tube is installed in place.

For additional questions on this procedure, or to have me clarify anything I have stated, please post in a Comment.

Moving on in an added Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Apr 04, 2013 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

What is the location of the nividia chip in the sony vaio vgc-ls25e?


Not what John asked Michael.

It's on the motherboard, close to the Processor socket,

http://www.buy-motherboard.com/products_show.php?productid=9802

Nvidia Go GeForce 7400 is the graphics chipset,

http://www.ebay.com/itm/nVIDIA-Geforce-GF-Go7400-N-A3-G72M-GPU-BGA-IC-Chipset-/360441880624?pt=US_Memory_RAM_&hash=item53ec02a030

It is mounted to the motherboard, John, with a BGA surface mount.
Ball Grid Array.

To explain the BGA surface mount;

Compare to an older Intel Pentium 4 processor, that uses a Socket 478 processor socket,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socket_478

The bottom of the Processor has 478 contact pins.
The processor socket has 478 matching socket holes.

With a BGA surface mount there are no pins, nor socket holes.
Solder Balls take the place of the contact pins.
Copper Pads take the place of the socket holes.

The graphics chipset is set down onto the motherboard, with the Solder Balls lining up to the matching Copper Pads.
(Copper Pads are also gold plated. Just like Ram Memory module contact pins)

Heats is then applied at a specific temperature, and length of time.
This action melts the solder balls, and solders the graphics chipset TO the copper pads.
(Which in turn of course, solders the graphics chipset TO the motherboard)

Overheating of the graphics chipset, on a continuous basis, will partially melt the solder joints, (Solder connections)
When the computer is turned off this allows the solder joints to cool down,
This causes Cold Solder Joints.
Which make a bad contact of graphics chipset TO motherboard.

BEST, and proven method of repair, is to send/take the motherboard to a specialized shop, that has a BGA Rework Station.

HOWEVER, if this is deemed a re-occurring problem, the fault is inadequate cooling for the graphics chipset.

Reflow the BGA surface mount for the graphics chipset, will NOT 'cure' the problem.
There needs to be more surface area added for the cooling, of the graphics chipset.

Using an HP Pavilion dv6000 series Notebook PC as an example, this is what one tech has come up with, to solve the inadequate cooling surface area problem,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JEpnqhRYGLw

I do Not approve of the reflow method the tech is using, HOWEVER I do give him kudos for application method;

1) The heat from the torch is being constantly, S-L-O-W-L-Y, moved around.
He checks the temperature on the graphics chipset constantly, with a special thermometer. Checks ALL over the chipset as heat is being applied.

This shows him the heat is being applied EVENLY.

2) The Thermometer. This is a NECESSARY tool.

3) Cool down period. S-L-O-W. I would cover with a heat blanket, so the chipset would cool down slowly.

The copper sheeting, (NOTE thickness), is used to provide more cooling surface area, for the graphics chipset.
THIS graphics chipset will Not overheat again.

I would like you to view more information on the BGA surface mount, using a Rework Station as an example to show you,
( 5 minute video),

http://www.ersa.com/art-ir-pl-650-346-1472.html

Scroll down a little, click on the Red -
Take a few minutes to view the IR 650 demo video.

Actual location when you open the all-in-one?
Under the Thermal Cooling Module. (Fan Assembly/Cooling Tube/Heatsink)

Not your exact model. Just posting to give you more info on disassembling,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0oO2DCkbHE

Subject deals with upgrading the graphics chipset?
No sir.
You would have to change the logic controller board. It may be built into the motherboard circuitry also, and not a separate circuit board.

If you are going to go that far, you may as well buy a better all-in-one, with better graphics.

For additional questions please post in a Comment.
Regards,
joecoolvette

Nov 17, 2012 | Sony VAIO VGC-LS25E PC Desktop

1 Answer

Dell l702x 17 motherboard


The chipset in reference is a graphics chipset.
Allow me to digress for a moment, and bring you up on a few basic things, so you know what we are talking about;

1) Chip and Chipset are slang terms for I.C.
Integrated Circuit,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrated_Circuit

2) The chipset, or Integrated Circuit for graphics; is a graphics chipset.
Proper term is G.P.U.
Graphics Processing Unit,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPU

Upon reading the article, you will learn that the GPU can be mounted directly TO the motherboard, or mounted on a separate graphics adapter card.

You are probably familiar with the last term.
It's a graphics card. Also can be stated as video card.

Doesn't quite work that way in all laptops, or can be said, all laptop manufacturers.
Best way to sell a laptop? Make it seem better than it is.
Stiff competition.
Use the fuzzy definition of Graphics Card, and make the laptop seem better than it is.

Going back to the term GPU. The graphics processing unit, is actually the little chipset in the middle. Around it is a small circuit board.
The circuit board is an interface used to connect the GPU, to the motherboard, OR graphics adapter card. -> Such as used in a desktop computer.

Laptops usually have Integrated Graphics.
Means it borrows from the System Resources. The Processor, and Ram Memory.
Yes.
This means the Processor, and Ram Memory are overloaded, when an intensive program is run. Such as an intensive game, for example.

An actual graphics card has it's own Processor. The GPU. But, it also has it's own graphics memory. Means it does not borrow from the System Resources.
Makes the laptop perform better. Also makes it sell better.
See why laptop manufacturers want to 'fudge', the graphics that is REALLY installed?

It IS a graphics card, but it is mounted to the motherboard with a BGA surface mount. This makes it TOUGH to replace, therefore tough to upgrade. Not really a graphics card IMHO.



From what I can gather looking at the specifications, for the
Dell XPS 17 Model L702x, it can come with a separate graphics card, or the GPU is mounted to the motherboard. (Integrated Graphics )

If it is mounted to the motherboard, it is Integrated Graphics.
IF so, the GPU is an Intel HD graphics. The GPU is built into the Processor itself.

If it is a separate graphics card, it is an Nvidia GeForce GT 550M,
OR, an Nvidia GeForce GT 555M. (Two options were offered)
M stands for Mobile.
It is a graphics chipset built for a Mobile computer.
Which a laptop is.
It is Mobile because you can carry it around.

According to what you have stated, from what you have been told, the motherboard needs to be replaced.

This means to me we are dealing with Integrated Graphics, whereby the GPU is soldered directly to the motherboard.
(Not a separate, thereby replaceable, graphics card)

The mounting for the GPU, or graphics chipset, is a BGA surface mount.
Ball Grid Array.

To explain the BGA surface mount;
Compare to an older Intel Pentium 4 processor, that uses a Socket 478 processor socket.
I do not know if you are familiar with this. If so disregard the following;

The processor has contact pins on the bottom. 478 of 'em.
The processor socket has matching socket holes,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socket_478

Now to go on;
With a BGA surface mount there are no contact pins, nor socket holes.

In place of the contact pins are Solder Balls.
In place of the socket holes are Copper Pads.
The Copper Pads are mounted directly to the motherboard, (Simple explanation), and gold plated.

The graphics chipset is set down on the motherboard, with the Solder Balls lining up on the Copper Pads.
Heat is applied at a specific temperature, and length of time.

This action melts the Solder Balls, and solders the graphics chipset TO the Copper Pads.
(Which in turn, of course, solders the graphics chipset TO the motherboard)

If the cooling system area for the graphics chipset is inadequate, the graphics chipset overheats.
Constant, repeated, overheating can cause the solder connections that were made, to partially melt.

When the laptop is turned off, the solder connections re-solidify.
This causes a Cold solder joint, or solder joints.
(The solder connection is a solder joint)

This cause a poor contact of the graphics chipset to the motherboard, and apparently what you are seeing.

I state apparently, because -> I do not have the laptop in front of me, and have not diagnosed the problem. Going by what you have stated, from what you have been told.

From the specifications I have seen so far, I see a touchscreen can be an option. Do I assume your laptop does Not have this option?
Post back in a Comment.

Now I would like to show you a BGA Rework Machine (Station), at work. Gives you more of an idea of what a chipset is, and the BGA surface mount,

http://www.ersa.com/art-ir-pl-650-346-1472.html

Scroll the page down, and click on the Red ->
Take a few minutes to view the IR 650 demo video

A 5 minute video.

This is an example of the CPU Heatsink, used to cool the Processor, and graphics chipset.
(Digressing; CPU = Central Processing Unit. Another term used is Microprocessor, or Processor for short),

http://www.parts-people.com/index.php?action=item&id=12048

Click on the image to enlarge.

You are looking at a Top view.

1) At the Top is a rectangular copper finned Heatsink.
It has thin pieces of a foam material that are black, on it.
(A type of Filter)

2) Coming away towards the right, you see two Cooling Tubes.
Slightly flattened copper tubes that are sealed on both ends, and filled with Nitrogen.

3) The first Large aluminum looking plate of metal at the Top, sits on the Processor. Two Philips head screws.
4) The rectangular shaped plate of metal at the bottom, sits on the graphics chipset.

The Fan Assembly is not shown. This is an example of it,

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Genuine-NEW-Dell-XPS-L701-L701X-L702X-CPU-COOLING-FAN-DFS601305FQ0T-W3M3P-/260861096735

(Scroll down)
Left side is the Bottom, that sits on the motherboard. Right side is the Top.
The Fan sits next to the rectangular copper finned Heatsink.

Heat from the Processor, and heat from the graphics chipset, si absorbed by their respective metal plates. The heat is then absorbed by the Cooling Tubes. The Cooling Tubes transfer the heat to the finned Heatsink.

The Heatsink absorbs the heat, then radiates it away with the thin fins. Air flow from the Fan Assembly helps carry heat away from the fins of the Heatsink.

That rectangular metal plate sitting on top of the graphics chipset, is TOO small in surface area. The surface area needs to be increased.
How? Here is one tech's idea. It has been around a long time, just showing you an example. This is towards certain HP laptops.
(Not advertising for this guy, or his company),

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JEpnqhRYGLw

More to follow in a Comment.............

Aug 01, 2012 | Nvidia Dell Xps 17 L702x Graphics...

1 Answer

Hp 2000blank screen


HP Pavilion dv2000 series of Notebook PC?

This series, the dv6000 series, and the dv9000 series, all have a graphics chipset cooling problem.
(Plus a few other HP and Compaq models)

1) Chip and Chipset are slang terms for I.C.
Integrated Circuit,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrated_Circuit

2) The Integrated Circuit for graphics is a G.P.U.,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPU

3) The graphics chipset is mounted to the motherboard, with a BGA surface mount

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ball_Grid_Array

Compare to an older Intel Pentium 4 processor, that uses a Socket 478 processor socket,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socket_478

The processor has contact pins on the bottom. (478 of 'em)
The processor socket has matching socket holes. (478)

With a BGA surface mount there are no contact pins, nor socket holes.
Solder Balls take the place of the contact pins, and Copper Pads on the motherboard take the place of the socket holes.

The graphics chipset is set on the motherboard, with the solder balls lining up on the copper pads.
Heat is then applied at a specific temperature and length of time.

This melts the solder balls, and solders the graphics chipset to the copper pads.
(Which in turn solders the graphics chipset to the motherboard)

Due to a poor cooling system, and specifically for the graphics chipset, the chipset overheats.

Constant overheating makes the solder joints partially melt, then when the laptop is off the solder joints cool down.
Cold solder joints result.

This creates a poor contact of graphics chip to motherboard, and what you are seeing. (Or I should say, not seeing)

The best method of repairing the problem is to use a BGA Rework Machine. Not an oven, propane torch, or Godzilla's breath.

Also cooling surface area is added using copper sheeting.

This link is posted for reference, not advertising. Shows you the hardware components, cooling system, and one method of repair.
I do not subscribe to the torch method.

[ Video poster does state in comment, (Show more), that using a BGA Rework Machine is best. ]

Regards,
joecoolvette

Apr 28, 2012 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Blue color on labtop is all vertical lines Hp


melch777, the HP Pavilion dv9000 series of Notebook PC's?

There is a problem with the graphics chipset cooling, for the
dv2000, dv6000, dv9000 series of Notebook PC's, and a host of other HP laptops.

LED lights light up, (Power On LED, and Harddrive activity LED ), fan/s may spin, and the harddrive may sound to be active, but no display on laptop's LCD screen.

[ Or to an external VGA monitor ]

Primer:
We'll start with the Cooling System.

The cooling system consists of a Heatsink, Cooling Tube, and Fan Assembly.

A) The Heatsink is essentially a thin small piece of metal, with Tall, Thin fins protruding from it.

The thin small piece of metal absorbs heat from whatever object it is placed against, and the tall, thin fins radiate the heat away.

The Heatsink is mounted to one end of the Cooling Tube.

B) The Cooling Tube is a slightly flattened copper tube, sealed on both ends, and filled with Nitrogen.

At one end are two small metal plates. At the other end the Cooling Tube is connected to the Heatsink.

One small metal plate sits on top of the Processor.
The other small metal plate sits on top of the graphics chipset.

[ A Processor and the graphics chipset, are the two hardware components that give off the most heat ]

C) Fan Assembly:
The Fan Assembly consists of the Fan, and surrounding cage. (Shroud)

Heat is absorbed from the Processor, by the small metal plate sitting on it. Same for the graphics chipset.

Heats is then absorbed by the Cooling Tube. The Cooling Tube transfers the heat along it up to the Heatsink.
The Heatsink absorbs the heat, then radiates it away through the tall, thin fins.

Air flow from the Fan Assembly, helps carry heat away from the fins of the Heatsink.

The surface area of the small metal plate, sitting on top of the graphics chipset, is too small.
This allows the graphics chipset to overheat.

Constant overheating, leads to the solder joints of the graphics chipset's mounting, to partially melt, then solidify.

This causes a 'cold solder joint', or solder joints, and poor contact of the graphics chipset to the motherboard.

Chip and Chipset are slang terms for I.C.
Integrated Circuit,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrated_Circuit

The chipset used for graphics is the graphics chipset, or G.P.U.,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPU

The mounting for the graphics chipset is a BGA surface mount,
Ball Grid Array surface mount,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ball_grid_array

To explain the BGA surface mount;

Compare to an older Intel Pentium 4 processor, and it's matching Socket 478 processor socket.

The Processor has 478 contact pins, sticking down on it's bottom side.
The Socket 478 processor socket has 478 matching socket holes.

With a BGA surface mount there are no contact pins, nor socket holes.
In place of the contact pins there are Solder Balls.
In place of the socket holes there are Copper Pads.

{The Copper Pads are gold plated. Better contact surface }

The graphics chipset is set into place on the motherboard, with the Solder Balls lining up on the matching Copper Pads.
Heat is then applied at a specific temperature, and length of time.

The solder balls melt, which solders the graphics chipset to the copper pads. (Which in turn of course, solders the graphics chipset to the motherboard)

Constant overheating leads to the solder joints that are made, remelting partially, then solidifying again.
This leads to a cold solder joint, or joints.
Poor contact of graphics chipset to motherboard.

The repair has been to add surface area with copper sheeting, for the graphics chipset. This added surface area then acts as a Heatsink.
Helps to keep the graphics chipset temperatures lower.
'Cures' the problem.

Different methods of re-soldering the graphics chipset back to the motherboard, have been used however.

If a BGA Rework Machine isn't used, the repair is sketchy.

Might last 2 weeks, 6 months, maybe a year, if other methods are used.

The following is for reference only, and not advertising for the poster, or website.

(I don't agree with the method used in the video for resoldering.
The poster of the video is redeemed however, in my eyes, if you read the comment immediately under the video; { Click on - Show more }

There a BGA Rework Machine is mentioned as a proper method to use)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnkQNmKauEc


Nvidia litigation page. Time limit long over with,
(Nvidia had nothing to do with the problem. It is the poor cooling design for the graphics chipset. Not the graphics chipset from Nvidia ),

http://www.insidemylaptop.com/free-repair-hp-pavilion-compaq-presario-laptops-out-of-warranty/

For additional questions post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Apr 14, 2012 | HP Pavilion Computers & Internet

1 Answer

My hp pavilion dv 2000 laptop while using within one hour hard disk is over heating


Yes.
One of two problems, or maybe a combination of both.

1) The laptop is dirty inside. Using a can of compressed air from the outside, (ALL power removed FIRST!), will NOT do the job.

Using compressed air in the air intake duct, (NEVER in the exhaust duct!), will just shove the 'Gunk' in further.
('Gunk' = Dirt, dust, hair, lint, food crumbs, etc)

The laptop needs to be disassembled, and a THOROUGH cleaning done.
(Not just take the top off, and bl-ow air around, and perhaps use Q-tips, and a soft small brush.

The cooling system assembly needs to be removed, and everything Thoroughly cleaned, to include the rest of the inside of the laptop.
Plus, it is GOOD advice to clean, and then replace the Thermal Paste )

2) It is because of a graphics chipset cooling problem. The cooling for the graphics chipset is inadequate. Plus barely enough for the Processor.

Chip and Chipset are slang terms for I.C.
Integrated Circuit,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrated_Circuit

The graphics chipset is a GPU,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPU

The cooling system for the Pavilion dv2000 series of Notebook PC, consists of a Cooling Tube, Heatsink, and Fan Assembly.

The Cooling Tube is a slightly flattened copper tube, filled with Nitrogen, and sealed on both ends.

http://forum.notebookreview.com/hp-pavilion-notebooks/228268-how-clean-heatsink-fan-assembly-dv2xxx.html

Scroll down to Step 5, a).

The copper curved tube you see is the Cooling Tube. Along most of the length of the Cooling Tube, is an aluminum plate.

At the other end of the Cooling Tube is attached a Heatsink.
This is the rectangular Black finned object, you see at the top of the black Fan Assembly.

The Fan Assembly of course, is the silver looking shroud, with the Black fan in the middle.

Heat is absorbed from the top of the graphics chipset, and Processor, into the aluminum funny shaped plate.
The heat is then absorbed by the Cooling Tube.

The Cooling Tube transfers the heat along up to the Heatsink.
The Heatsink absorbs the heat in the middle, then radiates the heat away through it's Tall, Thin, fins.

Air flow from the Fan Assembly, helps to carry heat away from the fins of the Heatsink.

The rectangular area of aluminum plate, that you see marked off by 4 screws, covers the Processor.

Come up the Cooling Tube a little bit to the left, and you will see a triangle shape meeting a small rectangular shape.
Has one screw hole in it, with no screw.

This small area covers the graphics chipset.

The Processor, and the graphics chipset, are the two hardware components inside a computer, that produce the most heat.

With the cooling surface area of the graphics chipset being inadequate, the graphics chipset overheats.
This can occur for quite a while, then tragedy strikes.

The graphics chipset is mounted to the motherboard, with a BGA surface mount.
Ball Grid Array,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ball_Grid_Array

To explain the BGA surface mount;

Compare to an older Intel Pentium 4 processor, that uses a Socket 478 processor socket.

The bottom of the Processor has 478 contact pins.
The processor socket has matching socket holes. (478)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socket_478

With a BGA surface mount there are no contact pins, nor socket holes.

Solder Balls take the place of the contact pins on the graphics chipset.
Copper Pads take the place of the socket holes.
(The pads are usually gold plated)

The graphics chipset is set into place over the motherboard, with the Solder Balls lining up on the matching Copper Pads.
Heat is then applied at a specific temperature, and length of time.

This action melts the Solder Balls, and solders the graphics chipset to the Copper Pads.
(Which in turn solders it to the motherboard)

Excessive heat in long periods can slightly melt, or soften, the solder connections that were made.
This creates a cold solder joint, or joints.

Result is a bad contact of the graphics chipset to the motherboard.

Solution is to remove the motherboard, (Following Anti-Static Precautions), and take it, or send it, to a shop with a BGA Rework Machine.

THIS, is THE proper method.
All other methods are chancy, and you may have the same problem again, REAL soon!

For reference only,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PhxOVh2sbl8&feature=relmfu

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Feb 18, 2012 | Dell LATITUDE Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Screen wont light up


wafy_m, the problem can be attributed to the graphics chipset, is lifting off of the motherboard.
The mounting has loosened.

This is because the cooling system for the graphics chipset, is inadequate.

Chip and Chipset are slang terms for I.C.
Integrated Circuit,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrated_circuit

The graphics chipset is the GPU,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPU

The mounting of the GPU to the motherboard, is done with a BGA surface mount,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ball_grid_array

To explain a BGA surface mount, compare to an older Intel Pentium 4 processor, that uses a Socket 478 processor socket,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socket_478

The Processor has contact pins on the bottom. 478 of 'em.
The Socket 478 processor socket has matching socket holes.

With a BGA surface mount there are no contact pins, nor socket holes.

In place of the contact pins there are Solder Balls.
In place of the socket holes there are Copper Pads.
(Which have a gold plating on them)

The graphics chipset is set into place over the motherboard, with it's Solder Balls lining up on the motherboard's matching Copper Pads.

Heat is then applied at a specific temperature, and length of time.
The Solder Balls melt, which solders the graphics chipset to the Copper Pads.
(Which in turn solders the graphics chipset to the motherboard)

With the inadequate cooling for the graphics chipset, after time the solder connections will begin to partially melt.

This leads to a poor contact of the graphics chipset to the motherboard, and the problem you are having.

As previously stated the cooling system for the graphics chipset, is inadequate.

Cooling System:
The cooling system consists of a Cooling Tube, Heatsink, and Fan Assembly.

The Cooling Tube is a slightly flattened copper tube, filled with Nitrogen, and sealed on both ends.

Towards one end of the tube is an aluminum plate. This plate sits on top of the Processor. Has four screws through it. Removing these screws removes the cooling system assembly.

Coming up the tube a little bit, is another aluminum plate. This one is smaller, and sits on top of the graphics chipset.

Connected at the opposite end is the Heatsink.
The Heatsink is a small thin piece of metal, with Tall, Thin, fins protruding from it.

Next to the Heatsink is the Fan Assembly.
The Fan Assembly, is a Fan inside of a cage, or shroud.

Draws air up from the bottom of the laptop, and pushes it through the Heatsink's fins, and out the side of the laptop.

Heat from the graphics chipset, and the Processor, are absorbed by their metal plates.
The Cooling Tube absorbs heat from the two aluminum metal plates.

The Cooling Tube transfers the heat along up to the Heatsink.
The Heatsink absorbs the heat, then radiates it away with the Tall, Thin fins.

Airflow from the Fan Assembly, helps to carry heat away from the fins of the Heatsink.

The surface area of the metal plate on top of the graphics chipset, is too small. It is inadequate in surface area size.

The one on the Processor is barely adequate.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnkQNmKauEc&feature=relmfu

The above is posted for reference. Pause the video at 7:43 to see the cooling system I described above.

1) Black Fan Assembly to the upper left.

2) To the immediate left side of the Fan Assembly is the Heatsink.
Black in color, slightly rounded outside edge, goes along the full length of the left side of the Fan Assembly. Hard to discern the fins.

3) The aluminum X shaped piece with 4 black screws in it, on the copper Cooling Tube, is the metal plate for the Processor.

4) Coming up the copper Cooling Tube towards the Fan Assembly, is the second aluminum metal plate. It is shaped sort of like an S, with flat ends. This plate sits on top of the graphics chipset.

Solution?
Properly remelt the solder connections of the graphics chipset, to the copper pads.
Add surface area to the Processor's metal plate, and the graphics chipset's metal plate.

PROPER method is to use a BGA Rework Machine. Performed by a shop who has one.

ANY other method may is less than. The procedure may last a week, a month, or maybe longer.

There was a recall on this series of Notebook PC.
It is over,

http://www.nvidiasettlement.com/index.html

[ No, replacing the motherboard does NOT cure the problem ]

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Feb 17, 2012 | HP Pavilion dv9000z Notebook

1 Answer

My computer fan wont turn off


That is because;

1) The inside of the computer is dirty. As such the cooling capacity has dropped. The Fan Assembly is trying to keep up with the call for cooling, and has to stay constantly on.

OR,

2) The laptop is suffering from an 'ailment', that is common for the Pavilion dv2000 series, dv6000 series, and dv9000 series of aNotebook PC's.

Specifically the cooling for the graphics chipset. It is INADEQUATE.

This leads to the graphics chipset overheating, and loosening the connection of the graphics chipset, to the motherboard.

To explain;

1) Chip and Chipset are slang terms for I.C.
Integrated Circuit,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrated_Circuit

2) The Chipset responsible for handling graphics, is the graphics chipset, or also known as the GPU,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPU

[ The Graphics Processing Unit for the Pavilion dv6500Z Notebook PC, is an Nvidia GeForce 8400M GS,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_Nvidia_graphics_processing_units#GeForce_8M_.288xxxM.29_series

It is Integrated Graphics. The GPU is soldered to the motherboard ]

3) The Nvidia GeForce 8400M GS graphics chipset, is mounted to the motherboard with a BGA surface mount.

To explain the BGA surface mount;
Compare to the older Intel Pentium 4 processors, that use a Socket 478 processor socket.

The bottom of the processor has 478 contact pins.
These line up with 478 socket holes in the Socket 478 processor socket,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socket_478

With a BGA surface mount, there are No contact pins on the bottom of the chipset, nor socket holes on the motherboard. (No socket)

In place of the contact pins there are Solder Balls.
In place of the socket holes there are Copper Pads.

The chipset is set into place over the motherboard, with it's Solder Balls lining up with the matching Copper Pads, on the motherboard.

Heat is then applied at a specific temperature, and length of time.
The solder balls melt, which in turn solders the chipset TO the copper pads.
(Solders the chipset to the motherboard)

With the inadequate cooling for the graphics chipset, the graphics chipset constantly overheats.
In due time the solder connections start to melt.

This creates a poor contact, of the graphics chipset to the motherboard.

Explanation of the cooling system, for a Pavilion dv6000 series of Notebook PC:

The cooling system consists of a Fan Assembly, Cooling Tube, and Heatsink.

A) The Cooling Tube is a slightly flattened copper tube, sealed on both ends, and filled with Nitrogen.

At one end it has a small metal plate.
One part of the metal plate sits on top of the Processor, and the other part sits on top of the graphics chipset.

The small metal plate AREA for the graphics chipset is TOO small.

Heat is absorbed by the small metal plate. The heat is then absorbed by the Cooling Tube.

At the opposite end of the Cooling Tube, is the Heatsink.
The Heatsink is a small piece of metal, with Tall, Thin fins, protruding from it.

The Heatsink absorbs heat from the Cooling Tube, and radiates the heat away with the Tall, Thin fins.

Air flow from the Fan Assembly, helps to carry heat away from the fins.

http://www.insidemylaptop.com/disassemble-hp-pavilion-dv6-laptop/

Drop down to Step 28. Here you are looking at a top view of the motherboard, and a top view of the Fan Assembly, to the upper left of the motherboard.

Go to Step 29.
This photo shows the bottom of the motherboard, and the cooling system.

Fan Assembly (Black),

Heatsink, (To the immediate right of the Fan Assembly. Black in color.
You can barely make out fins running horizontally),

and Cooling Tube. (Long curved copper tube looking object)

This explains in more detail, and is a video.
It is posted for reference ONLY, and not advertising for the video poster,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JEpnqhRYGLw

(The BEST method is to use a BGA Rework Machine. This way you KNOW the job will only be done ONCE)

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Jan 29, 2012 | HP Pavilion DV6500Z Notebook

1 Answer

My hp dv9815nr laptop turns on fine then a few seconds later it automatically shuts off what could be my problem and I also heard there is a recall.


There was a recall on the Pavilion dv9000 series of Notebook PC's. This has passed.

http://www.nvidiasettlement.com/index.html


The problem is the graphics chipset COOLING.

To be more specific, it isn't a problem with the graphics chipset itself, (Nvidia), it is the COOLING of the graphics chipset.
HP's problem.

Allow me to explain, and show you the cooling system for the Pavilion dv9000 series of Notebook PC's; (If you are not familiar)

1) Chipset:
Chip and Chipset are slang terms for I.C.
Integrated Circuit,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrated_Circuit

2) GPU:
The Graphics Processing Unit, or GPU, is the graphics chipset,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPU

The GPU for the HP Pavilion dv9815nr is an Nvidia GeForce Go 7150M,

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01394734&tmp_task=prodinfoCategory&cc=us&dlc=en&lang=en&lc=en&product=3689893

3) The cooling system consists of the Fan Assembly, Heatsink, Cooling Tube, and Thermal Paste.

The Cooling Tube is a slightly flattened copper pipe, sealed on both ends, and filled with Nitrogen gas.
It has two metal small plates attached to it.

One small metal plate sits on top of the Processor. The other small plate sits on top of the GPU.

Heat is absorbed by the small metal plates, and then absorbed by the Cooling Tube, from the plates.

Heat is then transferred to the Heatsink. A thin, small metal plate, with Tall, thin fins protruding from it.

The Heatsink absorbs the heat from the Cooling Tube. Then heat is radiated away from the Tall, thin fins.
The air flow from the Fan Assembly helps to carry heat away from the fins.

The small metal plate that sits on the GPU is too Small.
The small metal plate that sits on top of the CPU (Processor) is barely adequate in surface area size, also.

This means the GPU will overheat. With constant overheating the mounting of the graphics chipset, (GPU) will loosen.

The graphics chipset is mounted via a BGA surface mount.
Allow me to explain the BGA surface mount;

Compare to an older Pentium 4 desktop computer processor, that uses a Socket 478 processor socket.

The processor has 478 contact pins on the bottom side.
The processor socket has 478 matching socket holes.

With a BGA surface mount there are no contact pins, nor socket holes.
Solder Balls take the place of the contact pins, and Copper Pads take the place of the socket holes. (Or Processor socket)

The chipset is set into place, with the Solder Balls lining up with the matching Copper Pads.
Heat is then applied at a specific temperature, and length of time.

This melts the solder balls, and solders the graphics chipset to the copper pads. (To the motherboard)

With constant overheating the solder connections start to partially melt.
This creates poor contacts.
This is what you are seeing.

This video explains, and shows the problem. (Also the cooling system)
It is posted for reference ONLY, and not advertising for the video poster,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnkQNmKauEc&feature=pyv&ad=5823851286&kw=DV9000

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Jan 22, 2012 | HP DV9815NR Pavilion Laptop

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