Question about Circuit Breakers & Wiring Panels

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Electrical power my electrical power safety switch keeps cutting out every time I try toget power to one section of the house. even though nothing is pluggedin. Every time I switch on the 16 amp power switch it cuts electricityto the whole house. I have now called in two electricians who havecharged me call out fees and haven't done anything to fix the problem.One suggested I may have dampneess somewhere along the circuit do youhave any suggestions

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  • thijoy Jan 02, 2009

    i don't know what gfi outlets are can you explain and thank you for taking the trouble to answer me

  • thijoy Jan 03, 2009

    hi chowmix66
    thank you for responding now that I know what they are I can tell you I do not have gfi outlets just the normal powerpoint outlets


  • thijoy Jan 04, 2009

    thanks tommy this seems the most logical solution and I am sure I will find someone who can do this for me I have had a problem with mice so this seems a likely solution. Thanks for taking the time to reply

  • Stephen Evans May 11, 2010

    Your 16 amp breaker switch my be bad. are you in the U.S.? and what name is the breaker switch?

  • Stephen Evans May 11, 2010

    Gfi outlets look like a regular outlet except they have a test and reset button on them. These 2 buttons are usually in the middle between the 2 plug openings. let me know. Steve

  • Stephen Evans May 11, 2010

    do you have any gfi outlets in the area of the house with no power

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How old is your wiring? Is it cooper or Aluminiun? Important to Know. What type of electric panel is installed? If I were Your electrician I would locate the Point the panel feed reaches the Circuit( Either Lt Plug Switch Etc.) and track it from outlet to outlet through the complete cir. Youy could have damaged wires or Any number of problems, some times mice chew threw wires in wall. but tracking the circuit down step by step should be easy for a electrician, using a continuity tester. If you test intire ciruit you will find the problem impossible not to.

Posted on Jan 04, 2009

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AFCI-GFCI Circuit Breakers - Your Home’s Electric Service has Never Been Safer


Would you ever consider driving a vehicle without functional brakes? Probably not. Driving such a vehicle is simply too dangerous and yet the majority of Americans do something every day that is potentially more dangerous than driving a car with no brakes. We live with home electrical service that is not nearly as safe as it should be. As a result, thousands are killed or seriously injured by electrical malfunction, electrocution and electrical fires every year. What's even more alarming is that most homeowners are unaware of this sobering fact or assume making their home's electrical service safer is unaffordable. Thankfully a recent breakthrough in residential electrical service technology is making it easier and more affordable than ever for homeowners to protect their families from electrocution, electrical fires and other deadly electrical safety hazards.

The Problem with Your Home's Electrical Service
The majority of homes in the U.S. today are approximately 40 years old and unless they have had their electrical service updated to the latest National Electric Code (NEC), they contain either fuses or traditional circuit breakers in their electrical panels. While fuses and circuit breakers look and function differently, they both serve the same purpose. They interrupt the flow of electricity to a circuit in your home if they sense an overload or electrical short.
For decades fuses and circuit breakers have been the main electrical safety component of most home electrical services. The problem with traditional fuses and circuit breakers that most people are unaware of is that they don't provide protection from some of the most common and most deadly of residential electrical hazards, electrical fires and electrocution.
The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) reported that in 2011 that nearly 2000 people were killed or injured in home electrical fires alone. This doesn't include the countless others killed or seriously injured as a result of accidental electrocution. What's worse is that most homeowners are unaware that almost all of these deaths and injuries can now be prevented by an inexpensive and revolutionary new type of circuit breaker, known as the AFCI/GFCI or Dual Function circuit breaker.

What are Arc Faults and Ground Faults and why are they so dangerous?
The acronym AFCI stands for Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter and this device is designed to cut the flow of electricity when it senses an arc fault. If you have ever plugged in an extension cord or flipped a light switch and heard a loud popping sound, then you have experienced an arc fault. The sound that you hear is actually electricity jumping from one electrical contact in the plug or switch to another. Though this might seem harmless, an arc fault causes an excessive amount of heat in your home's wiring which, over time, can actually melt the wiring's insulation leaving the wire exposed. This can lead to an electrical fire. Since the majority of your home's wiring is hidden behind its walls, it's almost impossible to know if your home is at risk.
GFCI stands for Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter. Much like an AFCI, a GFCI is designed to cut the flow of electricity to a circuit; however a GFCI is triggered not by an electrical arc, but rather a ground fault. This is when electricity travels outside of its intended path as it tries to find the shortest path to ground. An example of this is when a person with a live electrical wire touches the ground or something resting on the ground that can conduct electricity. The electrical current will travel through the person's body as it seeks the shortest path to ground, electrocuting them in the process. It only takes 1/10 of an amp to kill a human being. To give you an idea of just how little power that is, the average 60 watt household light bulb draws 5 times the power needed to kill a person.

Why are these dual function AFCI/GFCI circuit breakers so important?
Prior to the development to the AFCI/GFCI circuit breaker if the NEC called for a specific area in the home to be AFCI and GFCI protected, typically laundry rooms and kitchens, to have both AFCI protection and GFCI protection electricians had to use a GFCI outlet and an AFCI circuit breaker to meet this requirement. The problem was that this was rather inefficient and troublesome, especially when the circuit was tripped because the homeowner had to check both the outlet and the circuit breaker to see which had tripped and then reset it. Not only does the dual function AFCI/GFCI circuit breaker eliminate this problem, it also provides better protection and can be installed on every circuit in your home quickly and easily for ultimate protection. Residential Electrician

on Jun 05, 2015 | General Electric Circuit Breakers & Wiring...

1 Answer

I only have power to half of my house power points the safety switch wont turn on


The breaker needs replaced. Hire an electrician. Those wires to it carry 240 volts. The only way to turn it off is to pull the meter.

Jan 11, 2015 | Circuit Breakers & Wiring Panels

1 Answer

General electric 200 amp breaker box. Power went out to all but 1 room.


I am no electrician, but it sounds like your box is too small for your house. Just saying. I would get an electrician to check the size or call somewhere like Lowe's or Home Depot and ask someone in the electrical dept.

Feb 15, 2013 | General Electric Circuit Breakers & Wiring...

2 Answers

I have a piece of woodworking machinery that operates with a motor requiring 14 amps.This circuit has a 20 amp circuit breaker that keeps cutting out even though this machine is the only thing drawing...


The 20 amps circuit breaker is there for a purpose, and changing the breaker to a higher one will warm up the wire it is connected on and will cause probably-fire!Cause the wire it is hooked on usually is #14 or #16 on most garages(I wonder why,connected to it are your water heater,washers and dryers and garage door openner).If your City gives you clearance to hook a number 12 gauge wire(or higher) for the purpose of using high amps machines then you can add at least 40 amps circuit breakers.

Oct 30, 2010 | Circuit Breakers & Wiring Panels

1 Answer

Oue RCD trips randomly when my wife is ironing. No particlar socket involved.May do it once and then it may be weeks before it happens again. No problems on switching RCD back on. A number of steam irons...


Not an Impedance this is a lower load trip switch on your power plug line.
All waht can be done is to keep a higher amp ELCB/MCB into this circuit and the fault will be over.
If ELCB then check if the iron is having any leak of the coils as a small leak can trigger a cut off.
Check your grounding

Sep 06, 2010 | Circuit Breakers & Wiring Panels

2 Answers

Renting old house with old power box uses 'plug in fuses' , doesnt have cut off safety switch ,i heard that i can by circut breakers to stop any surges and plug them into fuse box ,does that sound right ?...


Wow, all due respect, but someone would really be negligent to offer you a solution to this problem. An electrical panel isn't something to mess with, especially if you're asking these type of questions. Contact a professional electrician in your area or run the risk of electrocuting (that's DEAD by electricity) yourself. Good luck, and please be safe.

Aug 10, 2010 | Eaton ARC FAULT CIRC BREAKER

1 Answer

Pushmatic breaker keeps tripping everytime I hit


You have it shorted out somewhere along the line. If it is a light switch you are switching, what have you done lately to make this trip? Anything? You might have a bad breaker. You can check it by shutting off the power, pull the wire out of the tripping breaker, put it in another breaker, turn the power back on, switch the breaker on, then hit the switch and see what happens. If it snaps off, it is not the breaker, but the switch, the wires in the box, or the lights, or something along the line, you will have to check each one. New construction has made all lights and all receptacles separate, so if your house is old, you might be looking at receptacles too. Check anything plugged in to an outlet, make sure there is nothing shorting. Hope this helps.

Apr 03, 2010 | RTO Pushmatic 100Amp 2-pole circuit...

1 Answer

Wiring issue on a 1965 Roadrunner Travel Trailer


Generic comments follow:

I'm not real clear on what you are asking ... I can almost guarantee you that you will not find a wiring diagram for your trailer.

Your travel trailer operates on 12 V DC. Your frig, the heater, all the lights, radio, all 12 volts. Your running lights should be getting power from the tow vehicle. While towing, the tow vehicle should be charging the battery. You may find some 110 volt lights inside, but probably not. To keep your battery charged, you have 110 Volt AC power coming in. Your frig may run on 110 V AC but it still needs 12 volts for control. Your Air Cond and Microwave and TV (if equipped) will al,so run on 110.

Regarding the three wires from the battery, there should be a battery charger close by your 12 Volt fuse panel. Even though the trailer is a "vehicle" dont depend on using the frame as a ground like you would in a car. So, that accounts for two of the three - a red or black and a white wire. There may be some dedicated line that the battery supplied to account for the third wire.

There should be a emergency breakaway switch on the front of the trailer. This is a switch with a pull pin. If the trailer breaks away, the pin is pulled out by the tow vehicle and the electric brakes should be automatiocally applied to stop the trailer. This switch should be powered, unfused, directly from the traailer battery and go directly to the electric brakes - presuming you have this feature.

Be aware, this trailer power supply was built and designed for a life style far different from that we enjoy today. If you have a 30 amp cord, as I suspect, 30 amps is enough to charge your battery, run your 12 volt items, run a TV and AC or TV and Micro or Micro and AC but not much else. As you are aware, you have two circuits built with #12 and they are probably protected with a 15 amp breaker though the #12 would be protected with 20 amp breaker in a house. The cord is only rated for 30 amps and it may be tired, unless you have replaced it.

I hope I have provided a little insight to your situation. If I can be of further assistance, please let me know.

a

Sep 20, 2009 | General Electric GE INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS...

3 Answers

200AMP Breaker trips same time every night


Something doesn't sound right here. You indicate 2 200Amp breakers. With a single service entering the house, this is not possible. The "sub-panel" to the pool house is more likely a 100Amp setup, yes? If not, you have a bad setup and it should be corrected. I would suspect that you are attempting to pull too much current to the pool and that is what is tripping the breaker. Also, these breakers should not be run over about 80% of their capacity for the long haul. If they are, they tend to age and get either real sensitive causing tripping when it shouldn't or you can run 500Amps through it and it won't trip.

My suggestion is to revisit the setup. If the pool house is fed from the main panel, make sure that the breaker for it is not 200Amp. Second, try disabling the pool house breaker to see if that is the source of the problem and look more closely there.

Keep us posted.

Dan

Jun 29, 2009 | Circuit Breakers & Wiring Panels

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