Question about Thule Atlantis 1200

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Cracked thule storage box-want to fix it-How?

How do I fix a cracked thule lid that broke when we drove it into our garage?

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  • sarajthigpen Jan 04, 2009

    I need help repairing a cracked thule lid.

  • bstanleypa Feb 04, 2009

    Same problem - somebody (me?) left the garage door open-but-not-quite-all-the-way, and assuming it was open I backed our Thule car-top carrier into the door, cracking the carrier. Still has it's general shape, but is cracked and would definitely leak rain if used without fixing.
    Help?

  • davidtomahaw Feb 08, 2009

    Same thing here. What glue or adhesive would be best?

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Use Devcon High Strength Plastic Welder Epoxy for Vinyl, PVC Piping, Fiberglass,etc. Line up the broken area as best you can and apply the mixed epoxy on the interior side as well as the exterior side. Do not overwork. It gets stick and lumpy fast. Apply it while it's smooth. With this epoxy you have about 5 to 7 minutes before it starts to get real sticky. Use the edge of a thin cardboard box to apply. I used a piece of a cardboard nail box I had laying around. Don't use your good puddy knife because you'll never get it clean. Let it dry - about 15 minutes. Do the process again until you've got it covered well and as smoothly as possible.

Don't be alarmed as this epoxy is a creamy color. After the epoxy has dried, use a fine sand paper to sand it off. Wipe the sanded area clean with mineral spirits. Then use a glossy black spray paint to touch it up. Coat it with the spray paint several times while letting it dry in between sprays. It won't be perfect but it will be waterproof.

Posted on Jun 19, 2009

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Hi Fixya community, this question is dated, but for the sake of adding to the body of knowledge here... my story.

I have the popular Thule Atlantis 1600 which for reasons that still escape even the high volume vendors, has been discontinued as originally set up. A large (8 metres) branch fell on my Thule box splitting the upper carcass in many directions (both seams and field areas), in addition to the complete break of a front lower segment. I acquired the box for the features it represented, now broken, wanted to buy a new one --- wait... it is discontinued. While I was able to finally find one after much searching, I decided to try and fix the broken one. Well I have to say, it worked out great, and did not involve expensive epoxy, adhesives, hot air welders, or any of the methods most commonly referred to.

Thule's cargo boxes are made from ABS plastic. The same black plastic material used for your household domestic waste plumbing systems. Rather than use foreign (non-ABS) as your binding agent, simply use ABS. By keeping the joint material native, you are essentially re-establishing the continuity of the original material.

Take a small pieces of ABS pipe (any scrap will do, just ensure it's ABS -- will say on the side) and grind it down in shavings. I used a rotary cutting tool with a bit that looks like a common router bit for rabbit joinery. This resulted in very small shavings. Accumulate enough shavings and place in a small glass jam jar with a lid. I had to cover roughly 1.5 metres in crack length and found ABS shaving volume equal to a couple marsh mellows to be plenty. Here's the magic.... pour a small amount of Acetone into the jar and stir the contents (outside as it fumes) -- add more as needed just to get it to the consistency of carpenter's glue.

After you have bound the cracked segments of your Thule from the outside (I used rubberized packing tape as it great horizontal field strength but can be removed easily). The tape up doesn't have to be pretty, just ensure the edges are tight and tape is firmly holding it tight. On the inside, use a rotary cutting tool and any cutting bit to grind a trough directly where the cracks are. I when down approximately 3 millimetres and across approximately 8 mills. I left it rough to the touch.

Clean the trough with Isopropyl alcohol; let dry. Using a small paint brush (ones you find in elementary school water colour paint kits is fine) "paint" the trough with the dissolved ABS in your jar. The advantage here is the Acetone in the mixture dissolves the edge of your trough so both the slurry (your mixture) and the hard carcass body are naturally bonding. As you might imagine, the Acetone will evaporate leaving nothing behind but ABS -- as hard as the original, fully bonded to the original material. Once dried, apply additional coats to build up the trough to your preferred profile.

Remove the tape on the outside and you're set. You could apply some sealant to the outer surface of the cracked area, but I did not as keeping it clean to look at is difficult.

Good luck.

Posted on Feb 04, 2015

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Supposedly heating a strip of similar plastic the size of the crack should work. i am going to give it a shot

Posted on Mar 08, 2009

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1 Answer

Put thule hinge back on


Hi Jonathan, based on the date of your Q, you may have already moved on. For what it's worth... I have the Atlantis 1600, structure is identical, cubic feet size is different. When you state "put Thule hinge back on" I am presuming you're referring to the entire upper segment of the carrier as the hinges are only pins riveted to the upper carcass. These pins seat in the lower carcass latches (also riveted) when the lid is closed. If the lower latches are obstructing the pins from seating, it means the latches are locked -- simply insert your key and unlock them. The pins (hinges) will function normally again.

If you're referring to actually attaching the pins to the upper carcass, then I would use a 3/16" medium length rivet ensuring that you use a washer on the inside (where the rivet expands) to add the binding power that the carcass body will not.

Aug 03, 2012 | Thule Atlantis 1200

2 Answers

Wind blew the top lid of my thule off the hinges how can I fix this problem


I have a Thule Atlantis 688T 2100 with one broken henge. What they sell online and call a hinge is not a hinge but the spring arm that holds the top open. I contacted Thule twice with no answer and on the third try Thule sent an email saying they won't sell replacement hinges and would only fix it if it were on waranty which it is not. If anyone has a solution please let me know. Now you know about Thule customer support. If you buy a Thule product, good luck. You'll need it.

Dec 12, 2010 | Thule Atlantis 1200

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I have an old hitch mount bike rack : Thule 515-0109 and a Trek women's touring bike. How do I mount the bike on the rack?????


You have to buy a women's bike adaptor, (about $30) and it is a bar that makes the frame like a mens frame. Bike shops sell them.

Jun 01, 2010 | Bicycle Accessories

2 Answers

Small crack


Hi Peter,

A large (8 metre) branch fell on my Thule box splitting the upper carcass in many directions (both seams and field areas), in addition to the complete break of a front lower segment. I decided to try and fix it despite finding a replacement. Well I have to say, it worked out great, and it did not involve expensive epoxy, adhesives, hot air welders, or any of the methods most commonly referred to. Thule's cargo boxes are made from ABS plastic. The same black plastic material used for your household domestic waste plumbing systems. Rather than use foreign (non-ABS) material as your binding agent, simply use ABS. By keeping the joint material native, you are essentially re-establishing the continuity of the original material.

Take a small piece of ABS pipe (any scrap will do, just ensure it's ABS -- will say on the side) and grind it down in shavings. I used a rotary cutting tool with a bit that looks like a common router bit for rabbit joinery. This resulted in very small shavings. Accumulate enough shavings and place in a small glass jam jar with a lid. I had to cover roughly 1.5 metres in crack length and found ABS shaving volume equal to a couple marsh mellows to be plenty. Here's the magic.... pour a small amount of Acetone into the jar and stir the contents (do it outside as it fumes) -- add more as needed just to get it to the consistency of carpenter's glue.

After you have bound the cracked segments of your Thule from the outside (I used rubberized packing tape as it has great horizontal field strength but can be removed easily). The tape up job doesn't have to be pretty, just ensure the edges are tight together and the tape is firmly holding it tight. On the inside, use a rotary cutting tool and any cutting bit to grind a trough directly where the cracks are. I went down approximately 3 millimetres and across approximately 8 mills. I left it rough to the touch. Clean the trough with Isopropyl alcohol; let dry.

Using a small paint brush (ones you find in elementary school water colour paint kits are fine) "paint" the trough with the dissolved ABS from your jar. The advantage here is the Acetone in the mixture dissolves the edge of your trough so both the slurry (your mixture) and the hard carcass body are naturally bonding. As you might imagine, the Acetone will evaporate leaving nothing behind but ABS -- as hard as the original, fully bonded to the original material. Once dried, apply additional coats to build up the trough to your preferred profile.

Remove the tape on the outside and you're set. You could apply some sealant to the outer surface of the cracked area, but I did not as keeping it clean to look at on the outside is difficult when adding to the perfectly smooth outer surface.

Good luck.
small-crack-uj5yyv2q0ahr5z2plldwesul-1-0.jpg

Apr 28, 2010 | Bicycle Accessories

1 Answer

How to change locks?


Just replaced the locks on an Atlantis 200 which should be the same.
Pop off the 3 rubber caps around the lock and drill out the rivets.
Inside the box pull the plastic unit away from you (bending the aluminium strip slightly but this is fine) gaining access to 2 screws. Unscrew these (I used a small ratchet with a pozi bit rather than a screwdriver) and remove the plastic unit.
You'll have to take out the lock cartridge next. Theres various wedges in the plastic which you should try to hold open then a flat screwdriver near the cog should lever the whole thing out.
To get the barrel lock out of it's cartridge you'll have to push the tumblers in from the back with a very small screwdriver and gradually work it out. (the one I did had a snapped key so I'm assuming this part is easier if you are just changing locks for keyed alike purposes)
Fitting the new lock in to it's cartridge should be easy enough. When you reinsert the cartridge in to the housing make sure that the sliding bolt (that your key turns) is fully in the open position, otherwse your key won't do a thing.
Screw the housing back on and re-rivet the points you drilled.

Dan (Rothwell Trailers)

Jan 28, 2010 | Thule Atlantis 1200

3 Answers

Top section of Thule box(atlantis 1600)cracked


Try this link and scroll down to online live help and they might be able to provide you with parts:http://www.rei.com/help/feedback/feedback.html#_2

Nov 30, 2009 | Thule Atlantis 1200

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