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Loose mount and foucs ring will not turn

I have a Kiron 80-200mm f4.5 Macro 1:4 055 MC 36417275. It has loose mount and the and the foucs ring will not turn. How do I fix?

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The short answer is "you don't"! Take it to a professional camera repair man. If you try to fix it yourself, you will quickly end up with a table full of parts and no way to put them back together. Typically, lenses are made like complex jigsaw puzzles. If you try to fix it yourself, you will fail and it will cost substantially more to have it repaired then it would if you had not tried to repair it yourself.

Posted on Dec 31, 2008

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