Question about Orion SpaceProbe 130ST EQ Telescope

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Telescope view I have just purchased a celestron eq130 md when i look through the viewfinder i can see the planet but also the four cross members that hold the secondry mirror any ideas Thankyou

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It's not in focus--- turn the focus knob slowly in and then out until you get a sharp image....... use the lowest magnification eyepiece first-- that's the one with the LARGEST number written on it.

Posted on Jan 04, 2009

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I use a celestron astromaster 130 eq. When I focus on an object such as a planet at night, the silhouette of the secondary mirror and its mounts overlays the image of the planet. I do not experience this...


You need to collimate your telescope. This site has a really easy to understand diagram and instructions. Hope this helps. http://www.astro-baby.com/collimation/astro%20babys%20collimation%20guide.htm Good luck. Astronomyforums.net and cloudynights.com are two really good sites for information.

Sep 03, 2012 | Celestron AstroMaster 130EQ Telescope

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Am I supposed to see the cross in the centre of image on celestron 76eq


You will see diffrection spikes when focused on a very bright object

http://www.goldastro.com/images/newtonian.jpg

and this can also appear around a bright planet. However it is very irritating, and to minimise it, make sure your scope is well collimated (optically aligned).

There is too much to collimation to include here, but there are many guides on the Net

http://www.cloudynights.com/documents/primer.pdf

http://www.atmsite.org/contrib/Carlin/collimation/

Feb 22, 2012 | Celestron FirstScope 76EQ (180 x 76mm)...

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How do you use this telescope?


You point the axis of the scope to the star Polaris and polar align it-- then you put the eyepiece into the focuser. Your best bet is to locate a local astronomy club, the members will help you learn how to use the telescope.

A manual can be found on the Celestron web site here:

http://www.celestron.com/c3/downloads.php

Sep 11, 2011 | Celestron AstroMaster 114EQ (100 x 114mm)...

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Hi, a few days back I purchased Nexstar 4SE. I set it up exactly how it says in the manual still I cannot see any magnifying views from the eye piece. While aligning the telescope I can find the moon from...


Stars will always appear as points. It is not possible to magnify them enough to see them as disks because they are all extremely far away. A telescope will however show you stars and other objects that are too dim to see with the naked eye.

You will be able to see the planets as disks, and even features on the planets, such as the bands on Jupiter, the rings of Saturn and the phases of Venus, and also moons around some planets. There are other objects that will show more detail when magnified, such as nebula. You will be able to see a lot of craters and other detail on the Moon.

Your problem is simply that you are not pointing the telescope at these objects. This seems to be one of those telescopes that "automatically" finds objects, but these so called "go to" scopes only do this when they are set up properly. I can't say what step(s) you have missed, but clearly even if the scope thinks it is pointed at the moon, if you can't see the moon, it is NOT pointed there. The Moon will fill the field of view even with the least powerful eyepiece. If you are seeing stars as points, then the eyepiece is focussed and working properly.

Jan 13, 2011 | Celestron NexStar 4 SE Telescope

1 Answer

I can't see anything out of the large scope


Use the 20mm to view an object (building, tree etc.) far away during the daytime. Align the finderscope to the object.
To view the moon, leave the scope out to equalize the temperature for at least 1/2 hour. Use the 20mm and no barlow. Point the scope towards the moon by sighting along the barrel of the scope, then use the finder to zero in on the moon. You may then switch to the 4mm eyepiece. for a more magnified view of the moon. You will have to keep moving the telescope because of the earth's rotation. The higher the magnification, the more you will have to adjust the scope. Because of the cheap finderscope, finding the planets will be difficult. Best to always sight down the length of the scope to get you close. The planets will be small and indistinct.
This is not a astronomical telescope! May be used for views of the moon but the cheap mount is not suitable for other planets. Max power would be 225x NOT 420x as advertised. The erecting prism is for terrestrial use only.
Nothing discourages an amateur astronomer more than a toy store telescope. My advise would be to use this scope for nature watching and go buy a good telescope (Meade, Celestron, Orion etc.). Even Those 60mm refractors are superior to this! A descent scope would cost a minimum of $200

Nov 03, 2010 | Bushnell Deep Space 78-9512 (120 x 60mm)...

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When viewing venus or other stars there a black spot in the center of the object. It appears to be the 2nd mirror refleting to the main miror. what have I done incorrect?


You are NOT in focus. Turn the focus knob a little until you see a perfect "disk" for the planet. Stars are always POINTS of light, with a telescope or without a telescope.

Aug 28, 2010 | Celestron NexStar 114GT (269 x 114mm)...

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What level magnification do I use to see jupiter or saturn in a telescope?


Your 3.5 inch telescope has a maximum magnification of about 170 power.

This is under perfect sky conditions and a perfectly collimated telescope. Galileo used 30 power magnification to see Saturn's rings and the moons of Jupiter!

Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the focuser do not use the 2x barlow if you have one.

Point it at Saturn. You will see the rings. However they are almost slanted directly toward Earth right now. You will only see a thin line going across the planet.

By the end of 2010 they should open up again enough to make out the "ring" shape.

You only need about 50-70 power to view Jupiter or Saturn, or Venus. Mars is smaller and about 100 power to 120 power should permit you to see the disk of the planet (but it's still very small in the eyepiece).

Dec 29, 2009 | Celestron PowerSeeker 114 EQ Telescope

2 Answers

CELESTRON 127EQ faulty magnification


It won't increase viewing power by hundreds of time but it should be able to show you a close up view of the moon and planets where they look closer (or with the moon, parts of it look closer). When you say it looks further away, something is quite wrong as you know. It sounds like the eye piece is backwards in the mount? Can't imagine what else would make it smaller. Also can't imagine you could even get it in backwards. I have a scope by Meade that is essentially the same Newtonian design. Best of luck.

Dec 31, 2008 | Celestron PowerSeeker 114 EQ Telescope

1 Answer

Obscured view through telescope


You can slow down dew forming on the mirror by NOT pointing the telescope toward the sky during cool-down-- just leave it parallel to the ground. Same goes for your eyepieces -- leave them covered, or inside a case.

Dec 26, 2008 | Celestron AstroMaster 130EQ Telescope

1 Answer

Seben 150-1400 telescope


This is a pretty generic Chinese made 6" Newtonian reflector. The one's I have sampled produce excellent images. Celestron has a great online archieve of its manuals. This scope is similar to their C150-HD Newtonian Model #31056. The manual can be found here:
http://downloads.celestron.com/Manuals/telescopes/c150hd_g8n/c150hd_g8n_manual/c150hd_g8n_manual_0802.pdf

Google "beginning astronomy" and you'll get a quartr of million hits. Good over view here.
http://library.thinkquest.org/29033/frames.htm
and here:
http://www.skyandtelescope.com/howto/basics/3304616.html?page=1&c=y
While you are there get a subscription to Sky and Telescope or their other publication aimed at beginners, Night Sky.

Find a local astronomy club and join it.
HTH, George

Jan 22, 2008 | Telescopes

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