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No sound The video/dvd system works, however, there is no sound whatsoever. The Subwoofer light does not come on even though the cable and speakers are hooked up properly.

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Re: No sound

If the set does not light up you are having a power supply problem have a tech repair your system.good luck

Posted on Apr 28, 2007

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Where do the cables go for pic and sound

You can find the manual here if you need a copy.

This system was sold with speakers and connecting cables. One cable connects from the main unit to the subwoofer. The rest of the speakers supplied with the system plug into the subwoofer with their special connecting cables. If you don't have the subwoofer and satellite speakers along with the cables, you can't get sound out of this system. There is no built-in amplifier and no way to connect speakers otherwise.

The video connection to your monitor or TV is from the rear panel on the main unit. You can use an s-video cable, composite video (a single cable with RCA plugs) or component video (3 RCA cables), depending on the inputs supplied on the TV. Component video gives best performance if the TV supports it.

Jun 21, 2011 | Philips HTS3440/37 System


How to set up a seven-speaker home theater system

Set up a home theater

How to connect your speakers

In order to deliver surround sound, home theater systems require 5, 6, or even 7 speakers--and that's not even counting the subwoofer. Connecting all those speakers together can be quite a challenge, so here's a quick overview of the basics.

If you don't have an all-in-one, home-theater-in-a-box system, you'll probably need to supply your own speaker cables. There are several different types available--they vary in terms of wire size (or gauges) and termination types. Make sure you pick cable that's a good match for your speakers and receiver. And make sure they're long enough; the rear-channel cables in particular will be stretching all the way around the room.

Once you've selected your system and have all your speakers ready to set up, begin by placing each speaker at or near its intended location. Then, attach the cables to them one by one. After securely fastening one end of the cable to the speaker, connect the other end to the appropriate speaker output on the back of the A/V receiver. Be sure to connect the cable to the correctly labeled output.

For instance, the front-right speaker wire needs to go to the terminal labeled front-right. Also, make sure that each speaker connection is in phase, meaning negative to negative and positive to positive. Otherwise, your system's sound will sound out of whack. Repeat the process for every speaker in your system. Note that the subwoofer uses a coaxial-style RCA cable instead of standard speaker wire.

Once all the wires are connected, you should test the system with several DVDs and CDs, to ensure that everything is in working order.

For our first example, we used an elaborate 7.1-channel system, so it may have 1, 2, or several more speakers than your system. Some systems even employ wireless rear speakers, or virtual surround-surround modes that simulate multichannel experience from 3, 2, or even 1 speaker. And some listeners still prefer good old stereo sound from 2 speakers. No matter what type of speaker setup you prefer, however, the wiring basics remain the same.

How to position surround-sound speakers and a subwoofer
To get the best performance from a surround-sound speaker system, you must install each speaker in the correct location. There are three basic types of surround-sound speaker systems.

  • The 5.1-channel system has five satellite speakers and a subwoofer.

  • 6.1-channel systems have six satellites and a subwoofer.

  • And 7.1-channel systems have seven satellites and a subwoofer.

Start by placing the center speaker either directly above or directly below your TV. The center speaker can be perched atop a direct-view TV or mounted on the wall. Aim the center speaker at ear level.

In most cases, the front-left and front-right speakers can be wall mounted or placed on stands. However, if your speakers have rear-panel bass ports, they should not be wall mounted. Space your front-left and front-right speakers the same distance apart as the distance between your center speaker and your listening position. Position the front-left and front-right speakers no more than two feet above or below the front-center speaker. The tweeters in the front-left and front-right speakers should be roughly at ear level relative to your seating position.

Ideally, the surround-left and surround-right speakers should be mounted on the side walls of your room, slightly behind or parallel to your listening position. If your speakers have rear-panel bass ports, place them on stands instead. If installing the speakers on the side walls isn't practical, you can mount them on the room's rear wall or place them on stands behind your listening position. The surround speakers can be installed up to two feet above the front speakers.

Also, 6.1 surround systems have a back-center speaker. You'll typically mount this on the rear wall of your room, centered behind your seating position. Position the back-center speaker no more than six feet behind the surround-left and surround-right speakers. If your speaker has a rear-panel bass port or if the rear wall is too far behind your seating position, place the back center speaker on a stand instead. The back-center speaker should be installed at the same height as the surround-left and surround-right speakers.

Instead of a single back speaker, 7.1 surround systems use a back-left and a back-right speaker. These, too, are typically mounted on the rear wall of your room. Position the back-left and back-right speakers so that each is approximately aligned with the left and right edges of your listening position. Place the back-left and back-right speakers no more than six feet behind the surround-left and surround-right speakers. If your speakers have rear-panel bass ports,or if the rear wall is too far behind your seating position, place the speakers on stands instead. Install the back-left and back-right speakers at the same height as the surround-left and surround-right speakers.

A subwoofer is the last component of a 5, 6, or 7.1 system. Because bass frequencies are nondirectional, you can place the subwoofer in various locations. You may get the best performance by installing the subwoofer in the front of the room, approximately six inches from the wall. If you want more bass, try placing the sub near a corner in the front of the room.

Connect your DVD player to your A/V receiver--digitally
To hear a movie's soundtrack in surround sound, you must first connect your DVD player to an A/V surround-sound receiver. You'll need to make what is called a multi-channel-compatible connection.

The easiest way to do this is to use a cable that carries a digital signal. There are two digital options: optical and coaxial.

An optical digital connection, also called TosLink, uses pulses of light to deliver a digital signal. According to some experts, one advantage of optical digital connections is that optical cables don't pick up noise, while lower-quality coaxial cables can. Many, but not all, DVD players have an optical output. Most A/V receivers have at least one and usually multiple optical inputs. Plug one end of the optical cable into the DVDs player's optical-out jack. Plug the other end into the receiver's optical input.

Finally, you need to tell your receiver to use the optical connection whenever you switch to the DVD input. This is called assigning the input. Information about this simple process can be found in your A/V receiver's manual.

A second option is a coaxial digital connection. This type of connection is also used for cable TV, but the connectors are different. This type of coaxial cable has an RCA connector. Coaxial cables are less expensive than optical ones. In fact, you can use any old RCA cable to make a coaxial digital connection, and you won't lose any audio quality.

Most, but not all, DVD players, have a coaxial output. Some have coaxial and optical outputs, so you get a choice. Audiophiles argue over which connection is better, but it's very hard to hear the difference. Most A/V receivers have at least one and usually multiple coaxial inputs. Plug one end of the coaxial cable into the DVD player's coaxial-out jack. Plug the other end into the receiver's coaxial input.

Finally, tell your receiver to use the coaxial connection whenever you switch to the DVD input. Again, your A/V receiver's manual will have instructions for assigning an input.

on Aug 13, 2010 | Home Theater Systems

1 Answer

Samsung HT-X50. I just installed a new 50" plasma TV and cabled the digital out to the Samsung HT-X50 digital in via an optical cable. The TV audio is now heard through the HT-X50 speakers but only...

Look into the TV's audio controls. If it was my setup, I'd NOT send audio through the TV to the hifi, nor video through the hifi to the TV. Additional hops and interconnects cause problems even though they're theoretically transparent.

Jan 23, 2011 | Samsung HT-X50 System

1 Answer

There is no sound coming from the speakers on the SC-HT900 dvd home theater sound system. It used to make a loud pop sound but then would still work. Now it does not make any sounds. The dvd will play...

May be a fuse inside blown , if it makes a loud pop that can take out a fuse, If you find one blown , replace with same type and try machine .Dont replace with higher rated fuse though , if it keeps blowing. Try using headphones and if you get sound , may be speakers.

Nov 29, 2010 | Panasonic SC-HT900 System

1 Answer

Hi my philips hometheater HTS3450 subwoofer power supply is blown off and the philips guys are giving estimate of 100$. my question is if i dont want to use the subwoofer and the speakers but only connect...

yes.modern TVs have good speakers,and the bravia has a good set,with adjustable sound fields,plus a decent amp in them.just use good cables,and use component video cables,or HDMI if yr DVD has it.most have 1080 video resolution nowadays

Jul 01, 2010 | Philips HTS3450 System

1 Answer

Sound from 3 channels only

Sometimes what happens is that people r just confused with all wirings.Considering that you have connected the speakers correctly...Now according to u the center speaker is not working
  1. If u have a jack attached at the end of the speakers then try connecting the center speaker jack into the Right front/Right Rear/Left Rear socket at the back of the reciever.Just to make sure that your speakers r fine.
  2. Secondly play an audio cd first,sumtimes a video DVD not being 5.1 channel one confuses a lot.
  3. Assuming that you have checked the center speaker,like I asked u too,Connect it into its proper socket or better connect all the speakers.
  4. Now with the remote you check the predefined equalizer in it n keep changing that [pop,rock,jazz etc] or you might even want it to change it to 5.1 from a 3channel or 2channel Stereo.Everytime you change it listen to every speaker.
  5. Also check that you have increased all the speakers volume one-by-one.
  6. Disconnect any headphones attached.
  7. Switch on the selected source or select another source.
For further details u can check the manual.
The VGA cable of the monitor will work fine.

Jun 03, 2009 | Philips HTS3450 System

1 Answer

HTS3450 from Phillips, have video but no audio

I have been quite involved with a sound problem in my HTS3450 (search for the topic "sound in only 3 channels"), and I learned that when you are in the setup menu the speaker volume will be greyed out if there is a disc in the tray...remove the disc, wait for the "disc loading" dialogue to switch to "no disc", the try accessing the setup menu again. Other than that I have no advise if you once had proper function after moving the system. Check out my experiences with the cable connecting the sub to the DVD/receiver in my postings. Good luck. Steve

Jan 03, 2009 | Philips HTS3450 System

1 Answer

Philips hts3450 have video but no sound.

It seems your device is thinking it has no speakers connected, reconnect teh cable between the device and the subwoofer and make sure it is connected properly.Als chekc all speakercables if they are connected properly and correct (+ on + and - on -).

Jan 03, 2009 | Philips HTS3450 System

2 Answers

JVC TH-L1 sound

Almost the same problem. HDMI connections good, sound and video through monitor (LCD TV) , but no sound from the JVC unit speakers.

Dec 29, 2007 | Home Theater Systems

2 Answers

Buzzing in speakers of cinema surround

i have the same problem. haven't tried the fix yet, but someone recommend connecting the two pronged power cord to an adapter that switches it to a 3 pronged (adds the ground prong). i guess the adapters are less than a dollar and can be bought at most places.

Dec 04, 2007 | Home Theater Systems

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