Question about Microsoft Windows XP Professional

1 Answer

BOOT.INI deleted. How to re-create this file?

Hello,
I have 2 Operating Systems in a computer namely Windows XP(SP3) in C:\ & Windows Server 2003 in D:\ .
I've deleted the file BOOT.INI accidentaly form X:\ drive(X:\ means all drives like C:\,D:\,......I:\), considering it as virus file. It's location is X:\boot.ini by default. Is that file was virus?
After that incidence, During the every booting my computer tells me:

Invalid BOOT.INI file
Booting from C:\WINDOWS\

and starts the XP operating System automatically without asking for Server 2003.
There is no good guide for this situation on the internet.
The problem is that i dont have my xp cd so i cant get it
from there!!!
So how can i get this file back??

Posted by on

  • sandeepks9 Apr 22, 2009

    my computer shows the message that cnnot find boot .ini

    my comp works ok after that

    but i need to solve this

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1 Answer

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  • Contributor
  • 12 Answers

Hi,
That's not a virus. Boot.ini is a default file needed for Windows OS to boot.
Fortunately, you can recreate the boot.ini files

This is a sample of the above Boot.ini file with a previous installation of Windows 2000 on a separate partition. [boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Windows XP Professional" /fastdetect
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(2)\WINNT="Windows 2000 Professional" /fastdetect

Simple way to add operating system on a separate partition:
At the command prompt, type: bootcfg /copy /d Operating System Description /ID# Where Operating System Description is a text description (e.g. Windows XP Home Edition), and where # specifies the boot entry ID in the operating systems section of the BOOT.INI file from which the copy has to be made.

Please rate this if you found this answer helpful. :)


Posted on Dec 28, 2008

2 Suggested Answers

SOURCE: Hello, I have 2 Operating


Solution:

i)  I understand what ru trying to say, I'm afraid that iam not providing u with the right solution,                 however  would try my level best:

    a boot.ini file   contains this text for Windows XP;


[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect

so i want u type this text exactly in an note pad and save it as boot.ini and copy it from where you detled it.....hope so it works....

try making some changes to it(so that it will be Microsoft Windows 2003 server.....as it is the text for Microsfot Windows XP Professional)

note(imp): here "noexecute=optin /fastdetect "  comes next to the "Microsoft Windows XP                                 Professsional" which is above it....

                            (OR)

when logon into Windows XP go to start button----->Click on Run------>type msconfig in text box----->
highlight BOOT.ini, you will see the above text ......

 

Posted on Dec 28, 2008

acdr
  • 1913 Answers

SOURCE: BOOT.INI deleted. How to re-create this file?

type in run "cmd" then presss enter then type "bootcfg /?" it gives u some help .

Posted on Dec 28, 2008

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Aug 29, 2011 | Operating Systems

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How to make Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition see more than 4GB RAM


Issue – After upgrading a server to Windows 2003 Enterprise Edition and adding additional memory, the OS still shows only 4 GB of RAM.

Additional Information – Physical Address Extension (PAE)

In Windows Server 2003, PAE is automatically enabled only if the server is using hot-add memory devices. In this case, you do not have to use the /PAE switch on a system that is configured to use hot-add memory devices. In all other cases, you must use the /PAE switch in the Boot.ini file to take advantage of memory over 4GB.

The newer Dell servers are capable of using hot-add memory devices, but the older servers do not.

If you upgrade an older Dell server and are experiencing the issue above, make the following change to the boot.ini file.

[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(2)WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(2)WINDOWS="Windows Server 2003, Enterprise" /fastdetect /PAE

Add the /PAE flag to the end of the boot device. Then reboot the server.

After rebooting the correct amount of memory should be displayed

To summarize, PAE is a function of the Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003 memory managers that provides more physical memory to a program that requests memory. The program is not aware that any of the memory that it uses resides in the range greater than 4 GB, just as a program is not aware that the memory it has requested is actually in the page file.

on Apr 19, 2010 | Operating Systems

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Mamimum RAM for User @ 3GB using boot.ini switch on 4GB Physical RAM


The DOS will always take a percentage of the physical RAM on the motherboard leaving the rest for the User. By default the Windows Operating System will use 50% of the physical RAM installed on the motherboard leaving the user the remaining 50% this can be changed using a switch in the boot.ini file

The /3GB was originally meant to be used in systems that have 3GB or more of RAM something that is no longer quite as rare as it used to be Windows XP SP3 will support upto 4GB although on a 32bit (x86) version of Windows will acually see 3.25gb that is the limitation.

However, even if you don't have 3 GB or more of memory, you can still use the /3GB switch. the switch can have any value between 2048 (2 GB) and 3072 (3 GB) megabytes. It needs to be expressed in decimal notation.

The /3GB switch applies to 32-bit systems only (x86).

Example with Windows XP SP3 Home Edition with the recovery console installed this gives you the option of default 50-50% split or the 3GB switch 75-25% split.

The /noexecute parameter enables, disables, and configures Data Execution Prevention (DEP), a set of hardware and software technologies designed to prevent harmful code from running in protected memory locations using the optin switch enables DEP only for operating system components, including the Windows kernel and drivers. Administrators can enable DEP on selected executable files by using the Application Compatibility Toolkit (ACT).

The /burnmemory parameter specifies the amount of memory, in megabytes, that Windows cannot use in this example, /burnmemory=128 will reduce the physical RAM memory that is available to Windows by 128 MB.

[boot loader]
timeout=10
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition 3GB Switch" /noexecute=optin /3GB /fastdetect
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition " /noexecute=optin /burnmemory=128 /fastdetect
C:CMDCONSBOOTSECT.DAT="Microsoft Windows Recovery Console" /cmdcons


Check out the noexecute and the 3GB switch plus all available boot.ini switches HERE

I suggest that you use AnalogX MaxMem it is a realtime physical memory management program that automatically ensures that you always have as much physical memory available as possible used with the 3GB switch you should never have memory issues ever again.



on Mar 14, 2010 | Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition for PC

1 Answer

I have 2 HDD's in my PC - both with Win XP Prop


Boot.ini is correct, but looks default is booting from Disk2 and partition 1 which is your G:\ 500 GB.

Try Copying boot.ini from c:\boot.ini to g:\boot.ini It might help

In your example I see missing "\" after partition(1), may be typing mistake, but in real time can generate error.

You boot.ini looks exactly same in both drive c:\ & G:\

[boot loader]
timeout=10
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(2)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(2)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="GUY DRIVE XP Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect

Note: boot.ini will be hidden and readonly file. You need to unhide the file and remote the read only option and then only you will be able to save the boot.ini file

Hope this helps

May 22, 2010 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional SP2

1 Answer

BOOT.INI deleted. How to re-create this file?


type in run "cmd" then presss enter then type "bootcfg /?" it gives u some help .

Dec 28, 2008 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional for PC

2 Answers

Hello, I have 2 Operating Systems in a computer namely Windows XP(SP3) in C:\ & Windows Server 2003 in D:\ . I've deleted the file BOOT.INI accidentaly form X:\ drive(X:\ means all drives like...


Hi,
That's not a virus. Boot.ini is a default file needed for Windows OS to boot.
Fortunately, you can recreate the boot.ini files

This is a sample of the above Boot.ini file with a previous installation of Windows 2000 on a separate partition. [boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Windows XP Professional" /fastdetect
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(2)\WINNT="Windows 2000 Professional" /fastdetect

Simple way to add operating system on a separate partition:
At the command prompt, type: bootcfg /copy /d Operating System Description /ID# Where Operating System Description is a text description (e.g. Windows XP Home Edition), and where # specifies the boot entry ID in the operating systems section of the BOOT.INI file from which the copy has to be made.


Dec 28, 2008 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional

1 Answer

In my pc there is an problem of NTLDR missing . why this ill occure?


  1. Create a Windows 2000 boot disk that contains the following files: Ntldr
    Ntdetect.com
    Boot.ini
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  2. Modify the Boot.ini file to point to the correct hard disk controller and to the correct volume for your Windows installation. For more information about how to create a boot disk, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: 311578 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/311578/ ) How to edit the Boot.ini file in Windows 2000
  3. Insert the boot disk into the computer's floppy disk drive, and then restart the computer.
  4. Copy the Ntldr file, the Ntdetect.com file, and the Boot.ini file from the boot disk to the system partition of the local hard disk.
Method 2: Use the Recovery Console loadTOCNode(3, 'summary');
  1. Use the Windows 2000 Setup disks to restart the computer, or use the Windows 2000 CD-ROM to restart the computer.
  2. At the Welcome to Setup screen, press R to repair the Windows 2000 installation.
  3. Press C to repair the Windows 2000 installation by using the Recovery Console.
  4. Type the number that corresponds to the Windows installation that you want to repair, and then press ENTER. For example, type 1, and then press ENTER. For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: 229716 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/229716/ ) Description of the Windows Recovery Console
  5. Type the Administrator password, and then press ENTER.
  6. Type map, and then press ENTER. Note the drive letter that is assigned to the CD-ROM drive that contains the Windows 2000 CD-ROM.
  7. Type the following commands, pressing ENTER after you type each one, where drive is the drive letter that you typed in step 4 of "Method 2: Use the Recovery Console," of this article: copy drive:\i386\ntldr c:\

    copy drive:\i386\ntdetect.com c:\ If you are prompted to overwrite the file, type y, and then press ENTER.

    NOTE: In these commands, there is a space between the ntldr and c:\, and between ntdetect.com and c:\.
  8. Type the following command, and then press ENTER: type c:\Boot.ini A list similar to the following list appears: [boot loader]
    timeout=30
    default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINNT

    [operating systems]
    multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINNT="Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional" /fastdetect
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  9. If the Boot.ini file is missing or damaged, create a new one. To do so, follow these steps:
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      timeout=30
      default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINNT

      [operating systems]
      multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINNT="Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional" /fastdetect
      For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: 102873 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/102873/ ) Boot.ini and ARC path naming conventions and usage 301680 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/301680/ ) How to create a boot disk for an NTFS or FAT partition in Windows
    2. Save the file to a floppy disk as Boot.ini.

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    3. Type the following command at the Recovery Console command prompt to copy the Boot.ini file from the floppy disk to the computer: copy a:\Boot.ini c:\
  10. Type exit, and then press ENTER. The computer restarts.

Dec 05, 2008 | Operating Systems

3 Answers

Operating sytem problem


format ur drive where u install win server 2008...tats it..

Sep 22, 2008 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional

1 Answer

Booting error


What I would do is take the hard drive (1) out of that machine and put into an another pc - xp would be fine. Now go to the root of harddrive (1) and edit the boot.ini file. you will see an entry similar to this ......
[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /FASTDETECT

All you need to do is make sure you know which disk you're using (c drive is 0 usually) and the partition should be set to 1 for regular installations.

Did you add any drives lately? or make any changes to your OS?

Jun 14, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

2 Answers

Winxp cannot boot - missing files message


Just make sure you get these files on your computer.
Download hal.dll from here:

http://www.dll-files.com/dllindex/dll-files.shtml?hal

Place it in windows\system32 folder.

Now go to the drive you have windows installed in (C:/ for example), and then create a new file, name it boot.ini.

Open boot.ini with notepad, and enter this:

[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS /usepmtimer
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect /usepmtimer
Save boot.ini now, and try booting your computer, it should work.

Nov 17, 2007 | Operating Systems

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