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Alesis m-eq 230 stereo equalizer will cut out after 1 hr

And the signal sensor light, that triggers if it detects -20db, comes on and stays on even when nothing is plugged into the input.

i'm only using one channel but the problem occurs on both. after it fails both channels are cut...lights are on ... but no signal out.

if i reset it it works again for about 1/2 hr...then again for 15 minutes....then shuts off within 2-5 minutes. if i put a load on it it (play guitar thru it) fails quicker than just a no-load test(nothing plugged in).

nothing feels hot...i've tested with various alesis power transformers and plugged into various rooms and outlets (with a power condition...with a power strip...straight into the outlet...etc...) every situation causes the same failure.

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  • djnj81 Jan 08, 2009

    I'm finding the same thing too. It'll work fine for an hour or so, then start to go funny. Mine will cut out, come back on, work for 5mins and then cut out again. It goes through this cycle like clockwork. I dunno if it's internal or a power supply problem???

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Your internal circutry is failing... it sounds like its happening after it gets warm, which may cause an old/cheap part (or parts, like capacitors) to fail inside. think about how long have you had these items and how much use they have had.  As always, thanks for using fixya

Posted on May 27, 2009

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Hookin equalizer to tape deck and recever


The equalizer I have seen have Line in, line out, tape in, tape out and that is how you utilize a unit like this. The line IN goes to the receivers tape record out. The line out goes to the receivers Tape play in or monitor, The tape deck hooks to the equalizer. The record or input of the tape deck hooks to the EQ record out, the Tape decks output hooks to the EQ's Tape in connectors. All these are stereo so there are left and right sides which you need to keep consistent. Red on a cable means Right, the white or black on cables mean Left or the top RCA connector on most equipment.
When playing back a tape the tape monitor is turned on with the receiver and left on. The way you record on tape from any source of the receiver is to select that source and it should go to the equalizer. Then the deck should record that source. To play a tape of the deck hooked to the equalizer then just press the tape monitor button on the EQ otherwise the Equalizer will just act as a loop and equalize any signal source that is coming from the receiver and the tape monitor on the receiver should stay on most of the time. Some equalizers have two tape inputs so you would hook another deck to that input and the owners manual of the equalizer should say how to select buttons to transfer tape signals from one to the other. If you master the concept of inputs and output of audio equipment then this hookup becomes another easy thing to do.

Sep 22, 2012 | Sony TC WE435 Stereo Dual Cassette Deck...

1 Answer

How too hook up a audio source eq100 to my harman/kardon avr 1600. i have in the tape outs and ins on both devices but its not working PLEASE HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



http://www.retrevo.com/support/Harman-Kardon-AVR-1600-Receivers-manual/id/23554ag018/t/2/


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? The rest would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.



Okay, back to the hook-up:



You have to select any available 'tape loop' containing an overrideable analog 2-channel Out and In. That would be Video 1 or Tape on the HK.


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.



So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.


The EQ has its own Tape Loop(s) to replace the one it uses. Actual Tape Decks or Processors can nest into those loops and be engaged or bypassed via controls on the EQ or Processor.



Mar 10, 2011 | AudioSource EQ-100 Home Equalizer

3 Answers

How do I hook up the two stereo output RCA wires ( 1 L & 1R ) to the EQ input wires that are green/green&white & grey/grey&white?


you will only be able to control 1 pair of speakers, you can try an inline converter. always buy a stereo with 3 preouts especially if you plan on using equalizers/amps ect

Sep 12, 2010 | Pyramid 801 10-Band Car Equalizer

1 Answer

Sound cuts out


Hi Darren.
I suspect you may be right about the eq here, though you probably have had it sorted by now.
I came across this thread because I was searching for a fix to my R-231 and was hoping you might be able to help me if you found a fix. I'm persisting with this one as I can't really get another just now and it seems that it's not a major issue. I managed to get a good signal out of it when I ran it without the ground connected on output???
Anyway, any info I would greatly appreciate,
Thanks, Rob dronno@live.com.

May 20, 2010 | Digi-Tech DOD-Digitech 231 - 31 Band Per...

1 Answer

IM TRYING TO CONNECT MY EQ TO MY RECEIVER MY EQ HAS3 PAIRS OF RCAS LINE IN AND OUT TAPE 1 AND TAPE 2 WHICH ONE DO I HOOK IT UP TO ALL I USE THIS RECEIVER FOR IS FOR MUSIC ON MY IPOD.WILL TAKE ALL THE I...


You don't specify the receiver model or type so I'll give you the generic AV/Receiver advice that also applies to stereo receivers. It's probably verkill but the short answer is at the end.

Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Mon as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Mon is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.
If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

Apr 18, 2010 | Gemini Sound Products EQ-300 Home...

1 Answer

Broken equalizer


then something is open in the signal path....bad bypass switch, broken trace..etc..

Feb 25, 2010 | Alesis Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Technics SH GE70 : 1 bar doesn't do much


I would want to know if it's just an indiction problem or an actual notch.

Let's prove the signal is pure going to the EQ.

Tune between FM stations with no automatic muting on your receiver so you can hear a loud hiss. Monitor the EQ display. There should be a lot of energy across the bands. If you see the notch swap the inputs to the EQ to prove it's in the EQ. Otherwise the signal is being affected upstream.

Let's prove there's no audible notch in the bandwidth. This is the fun part.

Set your system to just play Stereo with the FM hiss and if there is a Stereo Direct setting that bypasses internal circuitry, engage it. Adjust the EQ for equal level and flat response on both channels.

Disconnect the two front speakers. Wire just one front speaker across just the Positive leads of the Left and Right amplifiers. This is not dangerous. (**)

** Back in the day we used this kind of wiring (with some proper resistance and circuitry to prevent interaction between the front channel speakers) to extract ambience (difference) information from plain stereo to drive a speaker at the rear of the room. Adjustment was done by selecting MONO and turning the Balance control for Minimum output, then going back to Stereo for listening. Ah, the old days.

What this does is make the speaker play only what is DIFFERENT between the channels. If the source is truly MONO as it should be there will be a minimal output presented to the speaker. In an ideal world a true mono signal fed to both channels in this manner would result in total silence. There will always be some difference in the real world.

You can prove the accuracy and fullness of the EQ signal by adjusting one channel of the EQ to be different and as you do the sound should start to rise as the Delta increases. Returning the controls to flat and equal should provide minimal output. If there is a solid audible difference in the treble range the EQ might actually be showing the 6.3khz deficiency accurately. To see if it's at 6.3khz adjust the LEFT channel downward to match the display of the RIGHT and the difference program material should become very low as heard from the speaker. That would indicate a true deficiency in the LEFT channel.

Fixing it might not be possible but you might be able to use the EQ to offset it.

Apr 29, 2009 | Technics SH-GE70 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

Mackee PPM808M 1200 How to set the equalizer


Each channel strip has its own 3 band EQ with knobs that effect the hi, mid, and low.

The mid is centered at 2.5kHz and gives you 12dB of boost or cut in either direction, the high gives you 15dB of boost or cut from 12kHz and up, while the low gives you 15dB of boost or cut at 80kHz and below. At their mid positions these knobs are flat (no cut or boost).

The PPM808M also has two 9 band graphic EQs in the Master Output Section on the front panel, Monitor EQ and Main EQ. These two EQs are the last thing in the chain before the signal leaves the mixer on either of these line outs (monitor line out, or mixer line out).

The 'Monitor EQ' effects output to the monitor speakers on stage (and power amplifier if the 'Power Amp Routing' switch is pushed in).

The 'Main EQ' effects the signal to the main speakers (or the mixer line out).

Each of these 'Master Output' EQs has a Rumble Reduction button which when pressed in engages a low-cut filter which rolls off frequencies below 75Hz and is designed to prevent 'stage rumble' from things like footsteps on the stage being picked up by stage mics. These filters are separate from the graphic EQs and the Main Rumble Reduction switch effects only mono channels 1-6 (not stereo channels 7&8). It also has no effect on the EFX to MAIN or the TAPE IN. The Monitor Rumble Reduction switch however does effect the EFX to MON signal.

Dec 31, 2007 | Audio Players & Recorders

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