Question about Pioneer VSX-9110TXV-K

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No Subwoofer playback

This receiver has whats called MCACC that automatically sets up your surround sound. Its a 7.1 system but right now i have two 12" tower speakers (Left and Right) a center speaker and a subwoofer. I run the auto setup and the receiver recognizes the subwoofer (yamaha 8"). it feeds a bunch of different frequencies to it and sets it at -7.0 DB. When the setup is done and i change it to surround sound, the sub doesn't playback at all. When i manually go in and change the db's it will put test notes through the subwoofer and i can tell how loud it will be. but when i save the settings and exit out of the EQ edit screen, it doesnt play at all. can anyone help? thank you!!

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Sell this back to the cool guy who sold it to you for 250.00 and take the money and buy some new Vann's.

Posted on Jan 13, 2009

  • beezo16 Jan 13, 2009

    here is your solution Mr. Kruz.. you can thank me at work..



    Re: Free Firmware Upgrade for Certain 2005 and 2006 Pioneer Home A/V Receivers

    We would like to inform you of the availability of a free firmware upgrade to address a potential service issue with the following Pioneer home A/V receivers:



    Pioneer has become aware that in some circumstances the above-listed receivers may experience certain audio and/or video symptoms related to the use of an HDMI port on the receiver. The symptoms include (1) picture quality issues (dark screen image, no video image, white screen and/or intermittent picture) when the input signal to the receiver is connected through an analog port (component, S-Video, composite) and the output signal from the receiver is connected though an HDMI port, or (2) low subwoofer speaker sound level when the input signal to the receiver is connected through an HDMI port. Importantly, this potential service issue does not pose any health or safety risk.

  • beezo16 Jan 13, 2009

    adding the contact numbers..

    If you have an affected home A/V receiver and you are experiencing a service issue as described above, please contact Pioneer Customer Service toll free at 800-421-1404 to arrange for a free firmware upgrade. Pioneer service representatives are available Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. (Eastern Time).

    We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this potential service issue may cause you, and we thank you for your cooperation and continued support of Pioneer.

    Sincerely,

    Pioneer Electronics (USA) Inc.

×

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Vsx-815 sb. system


Check in your speaker setup menu. Sometimes you can select between using the surround back speaker jacks as "B" front speakers as well. You would have to tell the unit which one you want to use it as.

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Subwoofer


go to audio set up and configure the system for 5.1 or higher sound output.then only all the speakers ll work

Jan 03, 2008 | Yamaha RX-V640 6.1 Channels Receiver

Tip

How to set up a seven-speaker home theater system


Set up a home theater

How to connect your speakers

In order to deliver surround sound, home theater systems require 5, 6, or even 7 speakers--and that's not even counting the subwoofer. Connecting all those speakers together can be quite a challenge, so here's a quick overview of the basics.

If you don't have an all-in-one, home-theater-in-a-box system, you'll probably need to supply your own speaker cables. There are several different types available--they vary in terms of wire size (or gauges) and termination types. Make sure you pick cable that's a good match for your speakers and receiver. And make sure they're long enough; the rear-channel cables in particular will be stretching all the way around the room.

Once you've selected your system and have all your speakers ready to set up, begin by placing each speaker at or near its intended location. Then, attach the cables to them one by one. After securely fastening one end of the cable to the speaker, connect the other end to the appropriate speaker output on the back of the A/V receiver. Be sure to connect the cable to the correctly labeled output.

For instance, the front-right speaker wire needs to go to the terminal labeled front-right. Also, make sure that each speaker connection is in phase, meaning negative to negative and positive to positive. Otherwise, your system's sound will sound out of whack. Repeat the process for every speaker in your system. Note that the subwoofer uses a coaxial-style RCA cable instead of standard speaker wire.

Once all the wires are connected, you should test the system with several DVDs and CDs, to ensure that everything is in working order.

For our first example, we used an elaborate 7.1-channel system, so it may have 1, 2, or several more speakers than your system. Some systems even employ wireless rear speakers, or virtual surround-surround modes that simulate multichannel experience from 3, 2, or even 1 speaker. And some listeners still prefer good old stereo sound from 2 speakers. No matter what type of speaker setup you prefer, however, the wiring basics remain the same.

How to position surround-sound speakers and a subwoofer
To get the best performance from a surround-sound speaker system, you must install each speaker in the correct location. There are three basic types of surround-sound speaker systems.

  • The 5.1-channel system has five satellite speakers and a subwoofer.

  • 6.1-channel systems have six satellites and a subwoofer.

  • And 7.1-channel systems have seven satellites and a subwoofer.

Start by placing the center speaker either directly above or directly below your TV. The center speaker can be perched atop a direct-view TV or mounted on the wall. Aim the center speaker at ear level.

In most cases, the front-left and front-right speakers can be wall mounted or placed on stands. However, if your speakers have rear-panel bass ports, they should not be wall mounted. Space your front-left and front-right speakers the same distance apart as the distance between your center speaker and your listening position. Position the front-left and front-right speakers no more than two feet above or below the front-center speaker. The tweeters in the front-left and front-right speakers should be roughly at ear level relative to your seating position.

Ideally, the surround-left and surround-right speakers should be mounted on the side walls of your room, slightly behind or parallel to your listening position. If your speakers have rear-panel bass ports, place them on stands instead. If installing the speakers on the side walls isn't practical, you can mount them on the room's rear wall or place them on stands behind your listening position. The surround speakers can be installed up to two feet above the front speakers.

Also, 6.1 surround systems have a back-center speaker. You'll typically mount this on the rear wall of your room, centered behind your seating position. Position the back-center speaker no more than six feet behind the surround-left and surround-right speakers. If your speaker has a rear-panel bass port or if the rear wall is too far behind your seating position, place the back center speaker on a stand instead. The back-center speaker should be installed at the same height as the surround-left and surround-right speakers.

Instead of a single back speaker, 7.1 surround systems use a back-left and a back-right speaker. These, too, are typically mounted on the rear wall of your room. Position the back-left and back-right speakers so that each is approximately aligned with the left and right edges of your listening position. Place the back-left and back-right speakers no more than six feet behind the surround-left and surround-right speakers. If your speakers have rear-panel bass ports,or if the rear wall is too far behind your seating position, place the speakers on stands instead. Install the back-left and back-right speakers at the same height as the surround-left and surround-right speakers.

A subwoofer is the last component of a 5, 6, or 7.1 system. Because bass frequencies are nondirectional, you can place the subwoofer in various locations. You may get the best performance by installing the subwoofer in the front of the room, approximately six inches from the wall. If you want more bass, try placing the sub near a corner in the front of the room.

Connect your DVD player to your A/V receiver--digitally
To hear a movie's soundtrack in surround sound, you must first connect your DVD player to an A/V surround-sound receiver. You'll need to make what is called a multi-channel-compatible connection.

The easiest way to do this is to use a cable that carries a digital signal. There are two digital options: optical and coaxial.

An optical digital connection, also called TosLink, uses pulses of light to deliver a digital signal. According to some experts, one advantage of optical digital connections is that optical cables don't pick up noise, while lower-quality coaxial cables can. Many, but not all, DVD players have an optical output. Most A/V receivers have at least one and usually multiple optical inputs. Plug one end of the optical cable into the DVDs player's optical-out jack. Plug the other end into the receiver's optical input.

Finally, you need to tell your receiver to use the optical connection whenever you switch to the DVD input. This is called assigning the input. Information about this simple process can be found in your A/V receiver's manual.

A second option is a coaxial digital connection. This type of connection is also used for cable TV, but the connectors are different. This type of coaxial cable has an RCA connector. Coaxial cables are less expensive than optical ones. In fact, you can use any old RCA cable to make a coaxial digital connection, and you won't lose any audio quality.

Most, but not all, DVD players, have a coaxial output. Some have coaxial and optical outputs, so you get a choice. Audiophiles argue over which connection is better, but it's very hard to hear the difference. Most A/V receivers have at least one and usually multiple coaxial inputs. Plug one end of the coaxial cable into the DVD player's coaxial-out jack. Plug the other end into the receiver's coaxial input.

Finally, tell your receiver to use the coaxial connection whenever you switch to the DVD input. Again, your A/V receiver's manual will have instructions for assigning an input.

on Aug 13, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

2 Answers

Our denon 1708 only play on stereo mode,no sound when it select on 7 channel.. crackling on dolby. what is the problem on that receiver? please help


The surround sound outputs outputs ic's in the remainder of the system have opened, or there is a short in the speaker wiring, check to make sure that is not the case, if okay! you will need a repairman to assess the situation.

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2 Answers

Auto MCACC Screen Appearing


It would appear the unit thinks your McAAC microphone is inserted. Is it?

Automatically setting up for surround

sound (Auto MCACC)

The Auto MCACC Setup measures the acoustic characteristics of your listening area, taking into account

ambient noise, speaker size and distance, and tests for both channel delay and channel level. After you have set

up the microphone provided with your system, the receiver uses the information from a series of test tones

to optimize the speaker settings and equalization for your particular room.

Make sure you do this before moving on to Playing a source on page 11.

Important

• Make sure the microphone and speakers are not moved during the Auto MCACC Setup.

• Using the Auto MCACC Setup will overwrite any existing settings for the MCACC preset you select.

• Before using the Auto MCACC Setup, the headphones should be disconnected and the iPod

USB, XM or SIRIUS Radio function should not be selected as an input source.

1 Switch on the receiver and your TV.

2 Connect the microphone to the MCACC SETUP MIC

jack on the front panel.

Place the microphone so that it's about ear level at your normal listening position (use a tripod if possible). Make

sure there are no obstacles between the speakers and the microphone.

The Auto MCACC display appears once the microphone is connected.1

Note

1 • You can't use the System Setup menu in either the main or sub zone when the iPod USB, XM or SIRIUS Radio input source is selected. When you set ZONE 2 to ON (page 61), you can't use the System Setup menu.
• If you cancel the Auto MCACC Setup, or leave an error message

etc.

It's all in the manual.

Some background on the process...

http://www.pioneer.eu/eur/products/42/98/tech/AVAmplifierReceiver/AF_MCACC.html

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1 Answer

How to switch on Sub?


surround and subwoofer may not work if there is an additional graphic equaliser operating.
1. check in your receiver speaker setting ensure your speaker setup doesn not have subwoofer set to NONE. this will block any signal to your subwoofer socket.
2 when you select your surround sound setting setup, ensure you select the speaker mode you want, if there is a multicontrol knob, cycle through the choices
select subwoofer mode and set it to yes.
if you have set-up small speakers S in your speaker settings then it could be that subwoofer is set to yes automatically if you have large speakers L, subwoofer has to be set additionally in the subwoofer setting.
3 test subwoofer on alternative device to test it is working ok
consult manual on enjoying surround sound and adjusting the speaker settings.

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Hi We are setting up our new Onkyo TX SR606 receiver but are having trouble with the automatic speaker set-up. The 2 front speakers, centre and the back right speaker are ok, but there is an error...


Hi there. If you are running a 5.1 speaker system, make sure your surround speakers are on the surround terminal NOT ON THE SURROUND BACK. the surround back is only for the 7.1 speaker system.

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1 Answer

Nakamichi AV-7 (issue with surround mode - prologic)


Nice Receiver!
>In your surround sound settings make sure the levels are set correctly and the distance from your listing point to the furtherest
speakers are set to accommodate the levels etc.
>How many speakers 5.1, 6.1, or 7.1 (1meaning subwoofer)
>Pro-Logic supports 5.1 but not sure about 6 or 7
>Pro-Logic II does support all
>Make sure you are hear the sound from all sometimes the sound is really faint if you are in surround mode

Thank You and good luck

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No signal on subwoofer out in Onkyo TX-SR703(E) - similar to TX-SR803


Hey Tad, I have the same problem and perhaps a solution. I just moved to the other SW "pre-out" and it seems to be working..the green light is on . Whatever works i guess.

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2 Answers

Lost instructions


The 'Subwoofer' output on your receiver is used to connect to a powered subwoofer with a built in amplifier. Your KLH speakers use what is called a 'passive' subwoofer, it gets its power from the receiver and then passes the higher frequencies to the left and right front speakers after taking out the low frequencies for the subwoofer. A speaker system with a passive subwoofer is good for casual listening, but a powered subwoofer is required for really hearing low frequencies and rumble in movies. The KLH speakers you have were highly rated in their time for their price. The four satellite speakers and center channel speaker have very good sound compared to the little 'midget' surround sound speakers most people buy today.

Here's how you hook them up:

- The left and right front channels from your receiver terminals should go to the terminals on the subwoofer marked 'From Amplifier'
- Your left and right front speakers are then connected to the subwoofer terminals marked 'To Speakers', they do not connect directly to your receiver.
- Your center speaker is connected to your receiver terminals marked 'Center'
- Your rear speakers are connected to your receiver terminals marked 'Surround'

That should get you up and running. If the bass isn't good enough with the passive subwoofer, you can get a decent powered subwoofer like the Velodyne VX-10 for about $150 and 'kick it up a notch'. Good luck and enjoy....

Jan 07, 2008 | KLH HT-9900 System

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