Question about Tsunami Pentium 4 Gaming PC (VA3000P4) PC Desktop

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Choices in building gaming computer on a budget


All my son wants for Christmas is to build a gaming computer. The budget is limited. I'm looking at "barebones" kits on tigerdirect. My question is, should I allocate money to using the latest (Core 2 Duo) Processors, or am I better off to save by buying a P4 and adding a lower-end graphics card? What about AMD processors? My son seems suspicious of anything without "Intel Inside", but I note an Athlon is even cheaper than a P4. Obviously, the less expensive the basic kit, the more we have for drives, accessories, etc.

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  • fitzonguam Dec 27, 2008


    Um, unfortunately, the Bank is a little more breakable than that!
    We're hoping to be under $500 with drives, etc . . . which brings me to the question, faster processor or separate graphics card?

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The best for a good gaming computer without breaking the bank would be a system using the AMD Phenom cpu. I hope this helps.

Posted on Dec 26, 2008

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What happen to the power supply when the voltage suppy is 230V and it were selected to receive 120 V


It will break down.
Use a ac-ac converter model psd-300 from brand HQ imput 230 V 50hz (=europe) this kind of example is to use to example computer it can bring secundair power 110V by 300W look the picture but there are more choices for modern computers this is an example for being in Europe when you will use a device from Amerika. but its much cheaper to get a standard power-supply if its possible by the standart dimensions to build in.

PSD300 300W STEP DOWN CONVERTER 220V TO 110V

Oct 01, 2015 | PC Desktops

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Tricks on Building a Mid-Stream Gaming PC


With the <b>advancement </b>of<b> technology</b> in the world of today's <b>computers</b> <b>games</b> became more popular as a way of fun time and the past, not only teenagers but also to those who are stressed their work and life and I just wanted to sit down and release tension. However, because of this advanced technology, games, more and more these days are power hungry and most people think of playing your favorite computer game, they need a computer system superior range. In addition, to purchase a high-level computer system will cost a lot - a lot of money.<br /> <br /> But if you are a player who is on a tight budget but still wants to play <b>modern PC games</b>, you do not need expensive computer just to enjoy the game. Construction in mid-stream for the game system will pay for about half of the high-end system, but you can still enjoy the pleasures of modern features and games can offer. Here are some important tips pc game when building in<b> mid-stream</b><br /> <br /> Most people would think that the most important part of a PC for gaming is the processor or the graphics card, but when a gamer considers building a gaming rig, one should invest on his Power Supply Unit (PSU). This piece of device will supply all the power a computer needs to operate. If you will buy generic PSUs, most of them are not that reliable and their reported wattage are inaccurate leading to inadequate power supplied to the computer parts. Some also do not posses power surge protection, which is very important. When inadequate power is supplied to all other parts of the computer, it may not perform the way it should be and may lead to deterioration of the parts. Weak PSUs are also responsible for those sudden shutdowns when you are on the heat of battle. <br /> <br /> This is because when the game displays many sprites, graphics textures, the computer needs extra power in order to satisfy the game's needs, and when the PSU cannot provide such power, the computer shuts down, which could really **** the gamer. To avoid these circumstances and bring out the full potential of your rig, invest on good PSUs. HEC and Gigabyte are very good brands of computer PSU.<br /> <br /> Another point to consider is the processor. Many people still question that should be used for players to dual core (2 CPU), or quad-core (4 CPU). For many people, the Quad core is the best game because it contains 4 CPUs at the same time together. In fact, most modern games can not use more than 2 processors, so it's quad-core, 2 processor is in standby mode. So if you're on a tight budget, dual-core processor, a timing clock large (&gt; 1.8 GHz) is more than sufficient to meet the needs of the game.<br /> <br /> <b>RAM</b> (random access memory) is also important in games. This is where the computer loads all the files needed to run the game more RAM capacity, the smoother the game runs. For a platform game, at least 2 GB of RAM is sufficient to run most modern games. More than 2 GB of RAM dedicated to the game can be excessive and do not run background applications of many, you're just losing the extra memory.<br /> <br /> <b>Graphics card</b>. This unit handles all the graphical and better graphics, better quality of graphics in the game gives. But the high-end graphics cards are very expensive. So try to aim for mid-stream cards, which are much cheaper, but still can not deal with images of game options. Examples of excellent mid-stream cards ATI HD 4770, ATI HD 4850, <b>Nvidia Geforce GTX 260</b>, <b>Nvidia GeForce GTX 270</b><br /> <br /> Video graphics memory. Most people misinterpret this information. Most people think that the more video memory, the card is better. Well, that's wrong. A graphics card with at least 512 MB or 1 GB of video memory is more than enough to run modern games. You only need a high video memory if you intend to play the game on very high resolution 1920 x 1200. In search of a good graphics card to determine the card with the best capacity for representation and processing power instead of video memory.<br /> <br /> Last but not least, the operating system (OS). The operating system usually depends on the player, the program that you feel comfortable. But most of today's games will be released on modern operating system and no more operational support and play it safe, buy and install the latest operating system. Microsoft Windows 7 is the recommended operating system for today's game because of its compatibility and stability.<br /> These are the particulars of your mind, you can build your own system of game players in mid-stream on a tight budget. Enjoy playing!<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />

on Feb 07, 2011 | PC Desktops

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How to Build a Computer


Have you ever thought about building your own computer? Actually buying a motherboard and a case ­along with all the supporting components and assembling the whole thing yourself?
Here are three reasons why you might want to consider taking the plunge:
  1. You will be able to create a custom machine that exactly matches your needs.
  2. It will be much easier to upgrade your machine in the future because you will understand it completely.
  3. You may be able to save some money.
And, if you have never done it before, you will definitely learn a lot about computers.
­In this article, we'll take you through the entire process of building a computer. You'll learn how to choose the parts you will use, how to buy them and how to put them all together. When you're done, you will have exactly the machine that you need. Let's get started.
The first step in building a computer is deciding what type of machine you want to build. Do you want a really inexpensive computer for the kids to use? A small, quiet machine to use as a media computer in the living room? A high-end gaming computer? Or maybe you need a powerful machine with a lot of disk space for video editing. The possibilities are endless, and the type of machine you want to build will control many of the decisions you make down the line. Therefore, it is important to know exactly what you want the machine to accomplish from the start.­
­ Let's imagine that you want to build a powerful video editing computer. You want it to have a dual-core CPU, lots of RAM and a terabyte of disk space. You also want to have FireWire connectors on the motherboard. These requirements are going to cause you to look for a motherboard that supports:
  • Dual-core CPUs (either Intel or AMD)
  • At least 4GB of high-speed RAM
  • Four (or more) SATA hard drives
  • FireWire connections (possibly in both the front and back of the case)
­ Then it all needs to go in a case with enough space to hold multiple hard disks and enough air ­flow to keep everything cool.
With any computer you build, knowing the type of machine you want to create can really help with decision-making.

Choosing a Motherboard Choosing a motherboard is the most interesting part of any building project. The reason it is so interesting is because there are hundreds of motherboards to choose from and each has its own advantages and disadvantages.
One easy way to think about motherboards is to break them up into a few categories. For example:
  • Cheap motherboards: Generally in the $50 range, these are motherboards for older CPUs. They are great for building inexpensive machines.
  • Middle-of-the-road motherboards: Ranging in price from $50 to $100, these are one step up from the cheap motherboards. In many cases you can find motherboard and CPU combos in this price range, which is another great way to build a cheap machine or an inexpensive home/office computer.
    -->

  • High-end motherboards: If you are building a powerful gaming machine or video workstation, these motherboards give you the speed you need. They range in price from $100 to $200. They handle the latest CPU chips at their highest speeds.
  • Extreme motherboards: Falling into the over-$200 range, these motherboards have special features that boost the price. For example, they might have multiple CPU sockets, extra memory slots or special cooling features.
You need to decide whether you are building a "cheap machine," a "high-end machine" or a "tricked-out super machine" and then choose your motherboard accordingly. Here are some other decisions that help narrow down your motherboard choices:
    CAPTION
    -->
  • Do you want to use an Intel or an AMD processor? Making this choice will cut the number of motherboards in half. AMD chips are often cheaper, but lots of people are die-hard Intel fans.
  • What size motherboard do you want to use? If you are trying to build a smaller computer, you may want to look at micro ATX cases. That means you will need to buy a micro ATX motherboard. Otherwise you can use a normal ATX motherboard and case. (There are also smaller motherboard form factors like mini-ITX and even nano-ITX if you want to go really small.)
  • How many USB ports do you want? If you want several, make sure the motherboard can handle it.
  • Do you need FireWire? It's nice if the motherboard handles it (although it is also possible to add a card).
  • Do you want an AGP or PCI Express graphics card? Or do you want to use a graphics card on the motherboard to keep the price and size down? If you want to go the cheapest route, make sure the motherboard includes a video card on-board (easiest way to tell is to see if there is a DVI or VGA connector on the motherboard). PCI Express is the latest/greatest thing, but if you want to re-use an AGP card you already own, that might be a reason to go with AGP.
  • Do you want to use PATA (aka IDE) or SATA hard disks? SATA is the latest thing, and the cables are much smaller.
  • What pin configuration are you using for the CPU? If you want to use the latest CPUs, make sure that your motherboard will accept them.
  • Do you want to try things like dual video cards or special high-speed RAM configurations? If so, make sure the motherboard supports it.
If you don't care about any of this stuff (or if it all sounds like gibberish to you), then you're probably interested in building a cheap machine. In that case, find an inexpensive motherboard/CPU combo kit and don't worry about all of these details.
Installing RAM and the Microprocessor But before we start building, we need to say one thing about static electricity. Most of the parts you will be handling when you assemble your computer are highly sensitive to static shocks. What that means is that if you build up static electricity on your body and a shock passes from your body to something like a CPU chip, that CPU chip is dead. You will have to buy another one.
The way you eliminate static elec­tricity is by grounding yourself. There are lots of ways to ground yourself, but probably the easiest is to wear a grounding bracelet on your wrist. Then you connect the bracelet to something grounded (like a copper pipe or the center screw on a wall outlet's face plate). By connecting yourself to ground, you eliminate the possibility of static shock.
Each combination of parts is unique. But in general, here are the basic steps you will need to follow when you assemble your machine:
­First, you'll need to unwrap the motherboard and the microprocessor chip. The chip will have one marked corner that aligns with another marked corner of its socket on the motherboard. Align the corners and drop the microprocessor into the socket. You don't need to apply any pressure - if it's aligned correctly, it should fall into place. Once you have it in, cinch it down with the lever arm.
Now, you need to install the heat sink. The CPU box will contain a manual that tells you how to do it. The heat sink will contain either a heat sink sticker or heat sink grease to use when mounting the heat sink on the CPU. Follow the instructions closely to install it. To install our heat sink, all we had to do was put it in place, cinch it down with flanges on either side and lock it with a cam. Connect the power lead for the heat sink to the motherboard.
Next, you'll install the RAM. Look on the motherboard for the slot marked "one" and firmly press the RAM module into it. It will probably take more pressure than you'd think to get the RAM into place. Each side of the module should also have a rotating arm that will lock the RAM down.
Now your motherboard is ready to put in the case.

on Dec 27, 2009 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

I have a zalman case model z11 plus/z11 hf1/z11 was wondering is this case compatible with water cooling fan as I heard its good as am building a gaming pc.


If you cant put a water cooler in a massive zalman case like you have, you had better learn how to. The basic sets go together like Christmas lights.

Nov 26, 2014 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

Build an all in one pc from scratch?


I really think that you will have a hard time finding used parts for this. Building you own AIO PC is pretty new. Before, they were like laptops in that each case was made specifically for certain hardware to fit inside perfectly. There was very little room for customization. A good place to start is with Intel. They have a push currently going for customized AIO PCs. You will need a Mini-ITX board, which are fairly new as well (for decent performance anyway). Below is a link to get you started with a case:
http://www.intel.com/content/dam/www/public/us/en/documents/catalogs/thin-mini-itx-catalog.pdf

Oct 20, 2014 | Dell PC Desktops

1 Answer

Acer Aspire All In One Graphics Card?


you are stuck with built in video. If you would like help doing a custom build id be more than happy to recommend some products that work very well together. Initial budget gamer runs around $400, but if you want to get serious i can show you how to build a world class system for about $800 that your friend would drool over. Below is a pic of the world class system I speak of that I recently assembled for my brother featuring liquid cooling, and the world record breaking AMD FX 8120. The entire build was about $700


https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/t1/71459_515378171910205_715074779_n.jpg
https://fbcdn-sphotos-b-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn2/t1/1524679_515378085243547_1921166238_n.jpg

Feb 19, 2014 | Acer Aspire AZ1620-UR31P G530 All-In-One...

1 Answer

Need agp video card


buy one generally off craigslist or ebay, since its a gateway and doesn't have a very big power supply you're going to be limited in you're choices of video cards. Generally a geforce 7300 agp would be a good choice for budget minded.

Dec 30, 2012 | Gateway E-4000 PC Desktop

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Hello there! I wanted to upgrade my ACER ASPIRE T180 Mobo: MCP61M-AM-6A61KE11C-00 I want to upgrade the stock CPU : AMD Athlon(tm) 64 Processor 3800+ Into an AMD Anthlon 64X2. Am2+ socket also...


AM2+ mainboard will mean that you will be able to install AM2 and AM3 CPU's. That includes Athlon 64 X2 and Athlon 2 X2 to X4.

My advice would be to look at an Athlon 2 X2 250 3.0GHz CPU at least. It will be able to run on DDR2 or DDR3 RAM, it depends which socket you install it in. AM2+ is DDR2 and AM3 is DDR3.
Try and get an AM3 mainboard if you can it is worth it, ASUS is good. However then you may need new RAM. You may want a new Graphics card as well. Go to a computer store or use the net to look around and learn more about the AMD computer. Computer stores build special gaming computers, very good looking and great performers. It all depends on your budget.

Take care and Happy Gaming!
damnor01

Jun 13, 2011 | Acer Aspire™ T180 PC Desktop

2 Answers

Need unlock code for build a lot 3


Tech Support, Instructions & Repair Service. Not games cheats. Look elsewhere.

Feb 01, 2009 | PC Desktops

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