Question about Edu-Science (10166) Telescope

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We have focused the telescope on an object - but it appears that the mirror is in the center of the view

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If your telescope is like the one in the picture it is a refractor telescope. It does not have mirrors-- the diagonal in the rear of the telescope has a mirror. Put the lowest magnification eyepiece in the telescope-- the one with the LARGEST number-- and try again. This may be easier to learn in the day time on a distant object.

Posted on Dec 28, 2008

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When using telescope for the first time (looking at venus) it would not focus, also the cross at the front of the tube was most prominent.


Do stars appear as small pinpoints in your scope? If not then it sounds like you have not adjusted the focus properly. I recommend you take your telescope outside in the daytime and point it toward a building or tree or hilltop that is somewhat distant from you. The exact distance is not important, but it should a block or more.

With the telescope pointed at the distant object, focus the telescope until the object is sharp and clear. The object might appear upside down -- that's normal for many astronomical telescopes. When you have achieved a sharp focus, leave the focus control alone until you are outside at night under the stars.

The focus should now be fairly close for viewing stars and planets. Small adjustments of the focus control may still be necessary for the sharpest view.

Venus is sometimes a difficult object. It is often fairly low in the sky where the atmosphere is most likely to blur the view. Find a bright star and focus it to a pinpoint, then swing your scope toward Venus.

- Jeff

Dec 27, 2016 | Celestron Optics

1 Answer

Why can I not see the difference from the sky and a star even when I allign my laser well?


It sounds like you have not adjusted the focus properly. I recommend you take your telescope outside in the daytime and point it toward a building or tree or hilltop that is somewhat distant from you. The exact distance is not important, but it should a block or more.

With the telescope pointed at the distant object, focus the telescope until the object is sharp and clear. The object might appear upside down -- that's normal for many astronomical telescopes. When you have achieved a sharp focus, leave the focus control alone until you are outside at night under the stars.

The focus should now be fairly close for viewing stars and planets. Small adjustments of the focus control may still be necessary for the sharpest view.

- Jeff

Jun 08, 2014 | Celestron NexStar 4 SE Telescope

1 Answer

We have a bushnell 78-8831 telescope, after assembly we still cannot view any images.


1. use the lowest power eyepiece (highest number in mm)
2. Point the scope towards a object (about 1000yds) away during the day and see if you can focus on the object. If you can not see anything during the day there is a problem either with the scope or set-up
3. Align the finder to the daylight object so it is ready for night viewing.
4. First night object should be the moon. Easy to find. ( A full moon presents poor seeing but this is just to get used to the scope.
5. Once the above steps are completed, use a good star program to find interesting objects (Stellarium, Cartes du Soliel, C2A are all freeware)
6. If you can not see the daytime object, remove the eyepiece and look down the focus tube. You should see a reflection of your eye in the primary mirror. If not, the primary and/or secondary mirror need to be collimated (aligned) refer to your owners manual.

Jul 12, 2011 | Bushnell NorthStar 78-8831 (525 x 76mm)...

1 Answer

Can not seem to get a view when I look through the lens how should it look like?.thanks.


Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the focuser. The FOCUSER END of the tube is the UP end the mirror is the bottom of the telescope.

Practice focusing on a distant object during the day time.

Sep 30, 2010 | Bushnell 3" Reflector Telescope w/Talking...

1 Answer

When viewing venus or other stars there a black spot in the center of the object. It appears to be the 2nd mirror refleting to the main miror. what have I done incorrect?


You are NOT in focus. Turn the focus knob a little until you see a perfect "disk" for the planet. Stars are always POINTS of light, with a telescope or without a telescope.

Aug 28, 2010 | Celestron NexStar 114GT (269 x 114mm)...

1 Answer

When i view a star or small object through my reflecting telescope i can see the reflecting mirror in front of the image. this does not happen when viewing the moon.


You may need to realign the mirrors and the view piece. You can look at the mirror from the front and your eyeball should ne centered.

Aug 28, 2009 | Optics

1 Answer

Problem focusing on distant objects


collimate your mirror.
sky and telescope shows you how to do it.
it's under 'Do-It-Yourself' section.

hope this helps :D

Aug 26, 2009 | Celestron AstroMaster 114 AZ (50 x 114mm)...

1 Answer

Veiwing is like looking at a do-nut? nothing in center


The focuser and eyepiece are POINTED UP toward the sky -- the mirror is at the bottom of the tube.

Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the focuser, and during the day time, practice focusing on a distant object.

Aug 13, 2009 | Bushnell 78-9669 Telescope

1 Answer

Obscured view through telescope


You are seeing the "spider" holding the secondary mirror-- the scope is not in focus--

Practice focusing during the daytime on a distant object at least 100 yards away-- use the lowest power eyepiece-- which is the one with the LARGEST number on it.

Dec 26, 2008 | Edu-Science (10166) Telescope

1 Answer

Focus?


The C8 optical tube has a very large focal range. It should be capable of focusing on objects from 15' to infinity. To focus on object at infinity you have to move the primary mirror foward. You do this by rotating the focus knob CCW. Rotate the knob CCW until it comes toa stop them slowly bring the mirror back by rotating the knob CW while viewing the object. It will snap to focus so don't move too fast yor you'll miss it.

Jun 25, 2008 | Celestron NexStar 4 SE Telescope

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