Question about Olympus Camedia E-20N Digital Camera

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Write speed I have an E-20P (European). I find the slow write speed an inconvenience. Will I benefit by using a high speed CF card.

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According to olympus - the camera controls the write speed, not the media card. Hope this helps :)

Posted on Apr 18, 2007

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Image processing delay


This may linked directly to an issue with the memory card or internal storage circuits.

When the shutter release is operated, the image projected on the sensor is collected and sent to the internal high speed memory of the camera called the buffer. This buffer is very fast - but not very large in capacity. Depending on your exposure settings (NEF, JPEG, NEF w/ Preview, Large, Med Small, Fine, etc.) you may be able to take anywhere between 6 and 75 exposures in rapid succession - this means 3 or 4 per second. Once the camera's internal buffer is full, it must be sent to the comparatively slow CF card. When this happens, no more shooting can take place.

A minute strikes me as being too long for this to take. I would recommend that you remove the CF card and copy the contents to a computer. Format the card by the computer to make sure that it has the capacity indicated on the label. If it is slightly less, it is OK - if it is more than that, it may indicate a problem area on the card that the camera is repeatedly attempting store data upon. If the CF card checks out OK, return it to the camera and format it in the camera. This is a very important step. Whenever you transfer pictures from the card - whether it is with a card reader or via a cable between the computer and the camera - format the card after the transfer in the camera - before taking more photos.

CF cards have dropped in price, and you may benefit from buying a new one for use in the camera. Select a faster class card whenever possible. Memory cards do have a finite number of read / write operations and you may be reaching the end of life on yours.

I hope this helps and good luck!

Jan 16, 2013 | Nikon D100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

My camera functions are not responding and when I try to take a picture it shows erro2 on the shutter speed screen, I have try to switch it off and replace the bettry and the cf card still no change


Concerning Err2, the manual states:'There is a problem with the CF card. Do one of the following: Remove and reload the CF card, format the CF card, or use another CF card'

It may also be due to using a card that is too slow. Try using a faster card.

Hope that helps,
BAX

Oct 08, 2011 | Canon EOS 10D 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Intermittently unable to review photos taken with Sony A100. Also at the same time unable to access the menu


Is the CF card a slow or counterfeit one? There are lots of cards on auction sites that are branded, but copies with poor quality components. try a known good High speed card. Also check if you have any bent pins in the camera CF slot.

Jun 02, 2010 | Sony Cameras

2 Answers

New SanDisk 4GB CF Card - Coolpix displays out of memory


This is because the Coolpix 2100 and 31000 models cannot handle a card of that large a capacity. As it's only a 2MP camera anyway it doesn't need it.

The Coolpix 2100/3100 will usually accept up to a 512MB CF card, and 1GB Lexar CF cards up to and including the 24x WA write accelerated (although write acceleration itself offers no benefits on this camera). With Sandisk only a plain old and now obsolete SDFB allows a 1GB card to be used and the regular Sandisk Ultra (not Ultra II or later) will only work up to 512MB.

The camera was discontinued long before these much larger CF cards were released and Nikon no longer actively support the product so no firmware updates will be available. The hardware wouldn't support such cards anyway.

Compatibility chart for CF cards address below:-

http://nikoneurope-en.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/26030/c/241/r_id/127673

Jun 17, 2009 | Nikon Coolpix 2100 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Vista driver for A2


Hello, I plugged my trusty old A2 into my new Vista computer and it recognised it in just a few seconds. If you are refering to your pics being able to be viewed, simply remove your CF or SD card and stuff them into the proper slot in your computer bypassing the recognition of camera altogether. Your question is not very clear, but I believe this is what you are refering to here. GL and enjoy your A2!

Jan 02, 2009 | Konica Minolta DiMAGE A2 Digital Camera

3 Answers

Not functioning d200


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Nikon D200 High Speed Performance
© 2006 KenRockwell.com Film vs. Digital About these reviews
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I bought mine from Ritz here. I bought another D200 from Adorama here. Also try Amazon here. Adorama usually has D200/18-70 kits in stock here. It helps me keep adding to this site when you click these links to get yours.
HIGH SPEED PERFORMANCE
General:
My D200 is fast, smooth and quiet. Unlike my D1H, my D200 makes less noise and vibration. It doesn't feel as macho, and allows me to shoot in more places more discreetly. At five frames per second it just hums along sweetly, compared to my bigger cameras which always felt like something was going to come flying off of them from all the clattering.
Buffers versus Memory Card Memory
The D200 uses two very different kinds of memory for storing images.
We're all familiar with the CF cards used to store hundreds of images. These aren't that fast and card makers rate them for write speed. The D200 uses these for recording your images.
The D200, like all professional digital cameras, has a second very high speed internal cache memory called a buffer. You never touch this. This buffer memory stores 25 frames of JPGs, 21 frames of raw or 19 frames of raw + JPG.
The buffer memory is fast enough to store all these frames at the full 5FPS rate, or faster.
The D200 is never slowed by memory speed card. The D200, like other professional cameras, has a second independent set of processors which handle writing the contents of the fast buffer memory to the slower CF card. Because this writing is done with a second set of processors you never know it's working except for the green CF light on the back. The D200 can be busy for over a minute writing to the CF card and you still have the complete ability to shoot at 5 FPS and play back.
The buffer is so deep that even under the heaviest shooting it's unlikely that you'll ever fill it. Even if you fill the buffer you can still make photos and playback, just that the maximum shooting rate will lower a bit until the buffer write and frees up at least one frame.
It takes it a 100 seconds to write 400 MB of data from 19 uncompressed RAW + Large FINE JPG files to my 40x 1GB Lexar card. As a photographer you don't care how long it takes to write. So long as the buffer isn't full the camera works as fast as ever. Even if it is full you can shoot the next shot as soon as the buffer clears enough room. You don't have to wait for everything to write to make a next shot. Even with my slow 40x lexar 1GB card, a constipated buffer and huge compressed raw + JPG Large Fine files I can make a new shot every 3.2 seconds. With uncompressed raw + JPG Fine Large I can get off a new shot with a full buffer every 3.7 seconds. If you ever get to these limits you're doing something stupid. Just shoot JPG and you'll never be able to fill up the buffer faster than you can shoot. With Large FINE Optimal Quality JPGs the buffer clears at the rate of 1 FPS. With Large Basic Optimal Quality JPGs I can run at 2 FPS even with a full buffer. Use the smaller image sizes or the Size Priority JPG setting and you can shoot as fast with the buffer full as empty!
I've had to do seriously stupid tests to fill it up.
Shot Buffer Readout
A shot buffer is fast memory inside the camera which stores the shots you've just made. Your memory card is written from this buffer. Even with the slowest card on earth you can shoot as fast as you want, since it all sits in the buffer until written. Your card is recorded in the background while you shoot. The green CF light tells you this is happening.
The size of this buffer is how many shots it can hold while allowing you to shoot at 5 FPS. If it gets full the camera slows to only as fast as your card will accept data, which is about one frame per second . These buffers are why you don't need to worry about card speed.
I've never filled up more than 9 shots in a buffer. I don't shoot that fast. With a 25 frame buffer the D200 has far more than I'll ever use.
This is the number you see while the shutter button is pressed halfway. It usually looks like [r25], which means it's empty and can hold 25 more shots. Normally you'll see a big number like [527] or [ 1.3]k, which is how many shots are left on your card. As you shoot fast sequences you can see this number drop. When it drops to [r00] your buffer is full and the camera slows down its shooting until the buffer is recorded to the card. It's fun to look at when you get your camera, but since I never fill it up I don't worry about it. You'd have to be shooting many long high speed sequences continuously with a slow card ever to use much of this.

Jan 27, 2008 | Nikon D200 Digital Camera with 18-200mm...

1 Answer

SD is slower


SD is approximately 1/2 the speed of CF, but the benefit is that SD uses almost 1/2 the power consumption of a CF card. Additionally, it leaves the CF slot available for different I/O cards.

Sep 15, 2005 | NEC MobilePro P300 Pocket PC

1 Answer

Speed of CF vs SD in Axim


The reason CF COULD be faster is that it is a parallel connection (16bit IIRC) while SD/MMC is serial in nature. Now, assuming the INTERFACE were the limiting factor in the speed this could become significant. Unfortunately the interface is NOT the limit (in most cases), the limit is the actual fetching of data from the memory itself. Being Flash it is nowhere near as fast as some of the other types of memory we are used to. It is especially slow when being written to. Newer cards out there are faster then older ones, but in the end I doubt you would notice much if any difference between the speed of a CF versus an SD/MMC card

Sep 14, 2005 | Dell Axim X5 Pocket PC

3 Answers

1GB IBM Microdrive


I got my 1gig microdrive last Wed. UPS says my Axim is going to be delivered today. I'll let you know how the microdrive performs as soon as he axim is charged.

Sep 13, 2005 | Dell Axim X5 Pocket PC

1 Answer

Memory card error - E50


Error Code "E50" (CF card formatting error) When a camera error occurs, an error code like "Exx" will be displayed, where the x's represent numbers. The "E50" error code indicates formatting a CF card has failed. Solution To clear the "E50" error, try performing the following procedure. 1. Try using another CF card. If you have another CF card, try loading it in the camera. If the error code is not displayed when the other CF card is loaded, there may be something wrong with the first one rather than with the camera. 2. Use your computer's ScanDisk utility to check the CF card for errors. Use ScanDisk to check the CF card for card error or card failure. Refer to the instruction manual for your operating system or Windows Help for further instructions. (If you are using a Macintosh, use the "Disk First Aid" program to check for card error or card failure. Refer to the instruction manual for your Macintosh OS for further information.) Be sure to back up the data on the CF card on the computer before you check the CF card. If a card error or card failure occurs when you use your computer's ScanDisk, there is something wrong with the CF card. Follow ScanDisk's on-screen instructions to solve the problem. If the same error occurs when you are using the CF card supplied with the camera, please contact the retailer where you purchased the camera or the nearest Canon service center. If the error code is displayed right after you took a picture, the image may not have been recorded. Switch the camera to playback mode to check if it was recorded. Precautions for handling a CF card: - Do not remove a CF card or disconnect the camera's power source while the camera is recording, loading, or erasing data on a CF card. - CF cards are high-precision electronic devices. Do not bend, force, or subject them to shocks or vibration. - Do not attempt to disassemble or alter a CF card. - Place the CF card in the supplied case for storage. - Moving a CF card rapidly between temperature extremes may cause condensation in the card, leading to potential malfunctions. To avoid condensation, place the CF card in a sealed plastic bag before moving it into a different temperature area and allow it to adjust slowly to the new temperature. If condensation forms on the CF card, put it aside until the water droplets have evaporated completely. - Do not use or store CF cards in the locations subject to dust or sand, high humidity, or high temperatures.

Aug 11, 2005 | Canon PowerShot A85 Digital Camera

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