Question about Ricoh KR-5 SUPER II 35mm SLR Camera

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Light meter Half-way through a roll of film, my light meter is showing green at 15 instead of the usual 1000- 2000 shutter speed on a sunny day. Any advice would be appreciated.

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Re: light meter - Ricoh KR-5 SUPER II 35mm SLR Camera 35mm SLR Cameras

Do ur camera has aperture?

Posted on Aug 30, 2007

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X-370S 35mm SLR Camera: what is the best aperture, shutter speed and iso f...

Your camera light meter should tell you, but in case it doesn't work then all you need to remember is the "Sunny 16 Rule". Basically, on a bright day and with the lens aperture set to f16 you set the reciprocal of the film speed.

So with ISO 100 film the reciprocal is 1/100, or 1/100th of a second. Your camera shutter speed dial doesn't have that, but it does have 1/125th which is close enough.

Once you have the exposure set for f16 then if you adjust the aperture you simply adjust the shutter speed to match. So if you decide to set f11 that allows twice as much light onto the film so to compensate you reset the shutter speed to 1/250th of a second to halve the light coming in. As twice the light coming in through the aperture is compensated for by halving the light coming in via the shutter, the exposure remains the same.

Although this works for a sunny day, you just guess based on experience other lighting conditions. So if it's bright but overcast then you can leave things as they are, but if it's dull and overcast allow one extra stop of exposure by opening the aperture by one setting or by doubling the time that the shutter remains open. So from the starting point of f16 at 1/125 (as above), on a dull cloudy day you'd either set f11 OR 1/60. If you set f11 AND 1/60 then you'll be allowing not just twice as much light in but three times as much.

Hope this helps, if so please take a moment to rate my answer. If it's too complicated then please add a comment and I'll re-explain in even simpler terms.

May 18, 2010 | Minolta X-370S 35mm SLR Camera

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Nikon F100 does not advance film to start of roll,

Jim, it really sounds like one of threethings. Either will require a repair shop.
1. the film sensor is not recognizing film in the film chamber, or film across the back, therefore not telling the advance motor to advance film...
2. The film advance motor itself needs replaced.
3. The rear door latch switch needs replaced.
Since everything else seems to do OK, I doubt the main computer board is bad.

Feb 03, 2010 | Nikon F100 35mm SLR Camera

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How do i use my shutter for my 35mm. film camera

If you're asking how do you set it, you should have a light meter. You can also use the automatic settings to eliminate the guesswork. Fir the manual use, the smaller the number, the larger the opening. An average setting is f8. f16 or f22 for a sunny day.

Oct 01, 2009 | Canon EOS-AE-1 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

How to KNOW the light is right 4 an Olympus OM20 Manual camera?

OM-20 was basically a upgraded OM-10 with the manual adapter built in and a number of other refinements.

The viewfinder has LED's to show the shutter speed recommended by the camera's lightmeter for the ISO and aperture selected. It also has an exposure compensation indicator (the +/- symbol) and an indicator for flash ready which doubles up as a post-exposure flash confirmation. There is also the indicator lamp to show manual mode has been selected. OM-10 lacks the manual mode lamp and the +/- indicator.

Like the OM-10, the OM-20 is primarily an aperture priority automatic camera. In this mode you set the ISO film speed, choose which aperture you wish to use (with the ability to use the lens depth of field preview button) and then the camera selects the correct shutter speed. The +/- exposure compensation control allows the user to tell the camera to modify the recommended shutter speed by up to two stops either way.

In manual mode, there is no manual metering. The light meter behaves exactly as it does in aperture priority mode and the viewfinder shows the recommended shutter speed and not the manually selected one. Correct metering is therefore a case of adjusting the aperture first, and then choosing the correct shutter speed indicated in the viewfinder. If the user then decides to select a different shutter speed, then the aperture ring must be adjusted to maintain the correct exposure. For example the aperture is set to f8 and the camera recommends 1/60th of a second. The user decides that a faster shutter speed is required and chooses 1/250th, but the viewfinder remains showing 1/60th. In order to keep the same exposure value the user must open the aperture by two full stops to f4. The camera's light meter will detect the new aperture setting and providing the light on the object is unchanged the viewfinder shutter speed display should now show 1/250th as well to confirm the correct adjustment. Alternatively, the user can choose the shutter speed first by looking at what has been set on the control ring (or by turning the ring to the end of its travel and then counting the clicks from there as all experienced OM users do) and then turning the aperture ring until the shutter speed shown in the viewfinder matches what's been manually set.

It all sounds clumsy and complex but is done far more quickly than I've taken to type this and becomes second nature.

Aperture priority metering is selected on the camera by choosing AUTO on the mode selecter. In this mode the shutter speed ring has no effect and the viewfinder always displays the automatically selected shutter speed.

May 09, 2009 | Olympus OM-2000 35mm SLR Camera

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Nikon EM (1979?) Won't wind film, photos don't come out

Not necessarily. The EM has an M90 setting which will fire the shutter at 1/90th of a second. The meter is inactive on this setting. It was put on the EM so that if the batteries fail, you can shoot at 1/90th and take a guess at the exposure. There is also a small button (blue or chrome, depending on the production run) which lights up a red LED if the batteries are good. The light meter doesn't work until the frame counter is at 1 or higher. Before the #1, the shutter will always fire at 1/2000th of a second to speed up the film loading process. You can tell that the meter is working by observing the meter's scale/needle on the inside of the viewfinder. If it is pointing out of the red zone, it's OK to shoot (proper exposure). If the needle is in the red zone (indicating under or over exposure) the camera will "beep" as an audible warning. Check the battery condition first.

Mar 16, 2009 | Nikon EM 35mm SLR Camera

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Changing lens

Your Nikon is a SLR which stands for single lens reflex. The reflex part is the way the mirror that lets you look through the lens to frame the picture flips up to let the light go straight to the film. You can change the lens half way through the film roll because the mirror is down while you change the film and blocks light from getting to the film, just as it blocks the light until you push the shutter button. Have fun with your 'new' camera! I use an even older style Nikon FE2. I like my Nikon 55mm macro lens but your newer camera takes autofocus lenses so you'll need advice from someone else for that.

Oct 01, 2008 | Nikon F65 35mm SLR Camera

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Problem in camera or film roll??

Hey msenile,
It is possible that each frame would have image data imprinted without and image being exposed. This could be caused by the shutter not opening while the camera still exposing the film internally with the image data recorded. It is unlikely that this bad film since the emulsion covers the entire surface of the film and if it were bad the image data would not be recorded either. Another cause of this but very unlikely is every frame was somehow extremely underexposed. This could happen if the camera is set to manual and the light level is low and the shutter speed is set to a fast speed and the aperture is set to a very small aperture. I hope this helps!

Go Ahead. Use Us.

Jul 18, 2008 | Nikon F80 35mm SLR Camera

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Turn it on

Actually, you don't have to "turn on" the Vivitar V3800N. Just be sure it has working batteries in it (takes two small alkaline button cells, unscrew the cover on the bottom with a coin--put new cells into the holder with the + side up). If the batteries are working, when you press the shutter button halfway down, you should see an LED light up in the right side of the viewfinder. This is the readout for the exposure meter: a red + indicates overexposure, red - is underexposure, a green dot means you've got the exposure correctly set. You just change the shutter and aperture settings until you get the green light, then shoot. When you load film, you also need to set the ISO film speed setting. Pull up on the outside ring of the shutter speed dial and turn it until the number in the window is the same as the ISO number on the film you are using. The batteries, by the way, only power the exposure meter. The shutter is fully mechanical (just like in the good old days), so you can use the camera without batteries if you have a separate exposure meter, or if you can estimate exposure. Film loading is about like any other 35mm manual camera: pull up on the rewind knob to open the back; insert the new cassette of film on the left and pull the film leader out a couple inches and hook the film to the takeup reel on the right. Move the film advance lever a bit to be sure the film is firmly hooked onto the reel, then close the back. Wind and shoot three shots to get the exposed film leader out of the way, and then start shooting. When the film is finished, press in the rewind button on the bottom of the camera and rewind the film into the cassette before opening the back of the camera. Good luck--these are pretty good little cameras. We buy a lot of them for the photography program where I teach, and I've only ever had one with a problem (meter was bad). The lenses are quite good, and they are "K-mount," which means that any Pentax bayonet lens, and gazillions of others with this mount, will all fit. --Michael R. Sawdey

Sep 03, 2007 | Vivitar V3800N Zoom 35mm SLR Camera

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Group portraits with fluorescent lighting

Appature settings are never precise because they constantly need to be adjusted to suit the individual lighting conditions, in other words it is impossible to make a blanket statement for the best fstop and shutter speed to use for florescent lighting since that would depend on the size of the room ambient light the number of florescent lights and the distance to the target. As a rule of thumb these cameras have reasonably good light sensors so setting them to auto and pressing the button halfway should show you a display of the recommended fstop and shutter settings. I would recommend then bracketing from these settings. Bracketing is the process of taking several shots while varying the exposure settings to "passthrough" the optimal settings. Usually if you have a good idea what exposure will work a three step bracket is all that is required.
Example (based on outdoor exposure):
Optimal settings show shutter at 500 fstop at 16
Bracket picture 1:
shutter 250 fstop 16
Picture 2:
Shutter 500 fstop 16
Picture 3:
Shutter 1000 fstop 16

There is also a handy rule of thumb for exposure settings
Note that this also changes based on type of film
See the following chart for iso 400 film fstop of 16:
Bright sunlight: shutter 1/2000 th or just 2000
Partly cloudy: about 1/500th or 500
Overcast:1/125th or 125
Medium source (open window on a sunny day): 60
Inside light: 30
Low light: 15 up to 1"
night: varying

Hope that helps

Mar 06, 2007 | Canon EOS Rebel K2 35mm SLR Camera

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