Question about Vivitar MAGNACAM Binocular

1 Answer

DEFINITION WHAT DOES CIF AND QCIF STAND FOR? HOW CAN I USE THEM IF I DON'T UNDERSTAND THE MEANING?

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Hot-Shot:

    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

    Corporal:

    An expert that hasĀ over 10 points.

    Mayor:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 2 times.

  • Contributor
  • 32 Answers

You can download the manual from www.mscustomercare.com and get the meaning of all the functions.

Posted on Aug 05, 2009

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

What type battery goes into the binocular ???


HI Jim....you require 2 batteries - Alkaline #186/LR43
or Silver Oxide #389/SR54. For further assistance call
800 423 3537

Regards,
Dennis

Nov 05, 2014 | Tasco Off Shore OS36 (7x50MM) Binocular

1 Answer

What are some compound nouns that starts with the word river?


riverbank, riverfront, riverside...
I don't know if this helps you understand this since you didn't bother to tell us what "this" is.

Sep 12, 2014 | Wind River Binoculars & Monoculars

2 Answers

What does 'jenoptum' mean?


Thanks for the research op ... interesting ... ok ... check link below ... http://www.holgermerlitz.de/seven8x30.html
"Jenoptem" is the name given to a civilian version of the Zeiss Jena Deltrentis 8x30 binocular of Porro prism design

Jena, Germany ... incidentally is where Carl Zeiss AG was founded (1846)

Made a leap of faith with regards to spelling "Jenoptem" vs. "Jenoptum".

Syz D

Sep 01, 2014 | Binoculars & Monoculars

1 Answer

I see double image unless I take the lens as close as the binoculars can go


thats how binoculars are. Yours in this case is really strong. the closer you are to something, looking at it, the more magiflyed you going to be. try view things far a distance, really far away. no more double right?
Everything you need to know to become an expert:
on this website: http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm
It is surprising how many people do not know how to focus binoculars correctly. There are two common focusing systems used in binoculars.
The first is individual eyepiece focus. This system is simple to understand, and easy to manufacture. It also lends itself well to sealed optical tubes, and thus is usually the focusing system used for waterproof binoculars. Individual eyepiece focus means that to focus the binoculars to your eyes, you simply focus the left eyepiece to your left eye and the right eyepiece to your right eye. There is no centrally located focusing mechanism. It is done like this. Look at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right binocular), and focus the left eyepiece to your left eye. Close the left eye (or cover the front of the left binocular), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. You are finished, until you need to look at something at a different distance, in which case you need to repeat the process.
Because individual eyepiece focus is time-consuming, center focus is more common. Unfortunately, very few people understand how to correctly use center focus binoculars. Here is how it is done. Aim your binoculars at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right tube), and focus the left side of the binocular to your left eye using the center focus control, which is concentric with the pivot shaft between the binoculars. (Note: the left eyepiece itself does not focus on center focus binoculars.) Next, close your left eye (or cover the front of the left tube), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. DO NOT touch the center focus control while you are focusing the right eyepiece to your right eye. Now you are finished. What you have just done is adjust the binoculars for your individual eyes. (Practically everybody's left and right eyes are different.) From now on, you only need to adjust the center focus control when you look at things at different distances. Center focus is faster and easier to use than individual eyepiece focus, once you have initially set the binoculars for your eyes.
Binoculars are commonly described by using a pair of numbers, as in "7x50" or "8x25." The first of these numbers refers to the magnification offered by the binocular. Magnification is why most people buy a pair of binoculars. In the examples above, "7x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at appear seven times closer than it does to the unaided human eye. "8x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at eight times closer than the unaided human eye. "10x" makes things look ten times closer, and so on. The first number used to describe binoculars always refers to their magnification. Common binocular magnifications are 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x, and 10x.
There are also variable power (zoom) binoculars, such as 7-21x50. These almost always perform much better at the low power setting than they do at the higher settings. This is natural, since the front objective cannot enlarge to let in more light as the power is increased, so the view gets dimmer. At 7x, the 50mm front objective provides a 7.1mm exit pupil, but at 21x, the same front objective provides only a 2.38mm exit pupil. Also, the optical quality of a zoom binocular at any given power is inferior to that of a fixed power binocular of that power. In general, zoom binoculars are not the bargain they seem to be.
Remember that everything (including movement) is magnified when you look through a pair of binoculars, especially your own shakes and tremors. So the higher the power, the harder it seems to hold the binoculars steady. 6, 7, or 8 power binoculars are easier for most people, even those with very steady hands, to hold reasonably still. The higher powers sound like a good deal, but often result in jiggly, blurred views. This is why 7x binoculars are chosen by so many experts, including the military.
Power affects brightness. Other things being equal, the higher the power, the dimmer the view. And power also affects the field of view of the binoculars. Again, everything being equal, the higher the power, the smaller the field of view. So, as you can see, power must be balanced against other desirable characteristics when choosing binoculars.

May 09, 2011 | Bushnell 240842 Binocular

1 Answer

Dropped my Zeiss compacts from tree stand. Now they are just not right. Any reputable repair centers to send them to? Just can't seem to get clear focus, alignment.


You'll want to send them to Zeiss for service, as they will be the only source for needed parts and special tooling to get the job done right.
Give them a call at 1-800-441-3005.
Best Regards,
Ben Lizdas
Sales Manager
Eagle Optics
www.eagleoptics.com

Dec 12, 2010 | Zeiss Victory Compact (10x25) Binocular

1 Answer

Where can I find a right side rubber replacement piece for Jason model 144 binoculars? I did not realize they unscrewed and it happened to unscrew somewhere in Jockey's Ridge state park. Thanks.


I solved the problem by getting over it and buying another one. Thank you, no assistance needed. I did not fully understand what your service is. My problem was not appropriate for the forum. Please unsubscribe me.

Oct 18, 2009 | Nikon Superior E Binocular

1 Answer

One of the eyes got broken when it fell out of the tree stand


chances are when they dropped other optics moved as well, that means they will have to be realingned. i dont know what they cost you but i think its a done deal. sorry for that ,but there is so much cheap junk on the market today that it makes sense to just buy a new one as a good optics teh would cost at least $80.00 per hour to repair....larry@reichinstruments.com

Dec 08, 2008 | Vivitar 7x42 Hawkeye Rubber Armored...

1 Answer

Vivitar Digital 10x25 Camera Binocular


What you refer to as st is actually (Se) for self shooting. You set it that way, push the 'S' button, and you have 10 secconds to pose for your picture.

ct means if you hold the 'S' button donw, it will take consectutive pictures, like when you want to capture a bird sitting and then taking off to fly.

The others I'm not too sure of, so I will add no more.

Jun 01, 2008 | Vivitar MAGNACAM Binocular

1 Answer

Loose the drivers CD


i don´t have the driver for Magpix B1380.
Somebody may help me?

Aug 31, 2007 | Magpix B-1380 Binocular

2 Answers

Rubber coating breaking down


Try it with rubbing alcohol first - just keep it away from the optics, and you may get lucky. The only thing that ever seems to work with these is an abrasive cream cleaner (jif/cif or similar) - you just have to use lots of cream and be careful not to polish the optics - unfortunately the stickiness will come back quicker than before though. I haven't tried myself, but i have heard that once you have carried out the cream cleaner routine, you can paint the unit - ask your hardware shop what sort of rubbery paints they have - ideally oil based and not acrylic. It wont last as long as the original finish or like quite as good, but it should stop the stickiness for a while at least. Try and keep your binoculars out of the sun - most of the stickiness is either caused by that, or contact with a damaging chemical such as most insect repellents, or petroleum products. Hope this helps :)

Aug 08, 2006 | Sigma Elite 8x22 Binocular

Not finding what you are looking for?
Vivitar MAGNACAM Binocular Logo

Related Topics:

89 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Vivitar Binoculars & Monoculars Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

96537 Answers

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

60971 Answers

Cindy Wells

Level 3 Expert

4757 Answers

Are you a Vivitar Binoculars and Monocular Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...