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Hard Drive won't boot Windows

I used to have a Dual Boot on my computer but I took out the Master and placed it in my New Comp. Now when I'm trying to use my old computer, the old hard drive won't boot up. I set that to master and everything but it won't boot up. It only boots when I put the other hard drive back in it together.

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Yes.. because the booting information and booting files are sored only in active primary partition of a hard drive. i.e primary drive. if you remove the primary it wont recognize the OS with out booting information. you should need to reinstall OS.

Posted on Dec 22, 2008

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I have a IDE HDD from my old Medion computer, which I want to install as Master in a newer HP dx5150MT computer. Having installed it; and, having tried and exhaused ALL options within BIOS & CMOS


You have to change the boot information in the MBR (master boot record) on the hard discs. To do this, you need either the install or update CD/DVD for your version of Windows (make sure that the SP matches). Note: if the drive from your original Medion computer has the drivers (motherboard and other hardware) from that computer, you need to reinstall the OS on to that drive. Then fix the boot record as you install the OS. Usually uninstalling the motherboard drivers is recommended before moving a hard drive to a new system.

You need to boot from the optical drive. Either set the BIOS to check the optical drive first or press F12 repeatedly as the computer starts up. (I usually have to restart and try again to access the change boot order menu.) Once you are in the Windows, you need to access the recovery console and the command prompt. You need to have the recovery program identify all the Windows OS options on the discs. If you have XP, first use the map command to identify the discs. Then use the command fixboot (devicename) and fixmbr (devicename) to put a new boot partition on the appropriate drive and then fix the MBR.

With Vista or Win7, the commands are slightly different. Use the Bootrec command. First use Bootrec /ScanOS to identify the versions of Windows on the drives. Next use the /RebuildBCD switch to list the available OS versions. Next use the /fixboot (if you want the Vista or Win7 OS to boot first) and /fixMBR switches.

Any hard drive repair utility CD for Windows will likely have a program to repair the MBR. These may be easier to use with some combinations of OS versions.)

I hope this helps.

Cindy Wells
(who has fixed the MBR on several machines after mving discs around and grumbled at the issue.)

Jun 13, 2012 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

My toshiba r15-s822 says it has no drive and gives a (Ide#0 ERROR) i had a virus and i formated the drive a while back and i got a new windows xp install but i cant seem to load it cause it wont show the...


Xp can only "See" a hard drive up to about 128GB, if its bigger than that, XP won't install.

Make sure your drive is properly connected, and jumper in the right place (1 drive, set to master)
If it used to work before your problem, should be ok.

Then boot from your windows disk. If your bios is set to boot from the hard drive, if there's no operating system on your hard drive it can't boot.

If its set to boot from the hard drive first, it may, after a few seconds revert to booting from the disk drive. If not, while booting watch the screen, at the bottom it you should see "Press F2 for setup or F10 for boot options" or something similar. To temporarily change the settings, choose the boot options menu and select "Boot from CD". Restart and you should be on your way.

If that doesn't work, you may need a new hard drive.

Aug 23, 2011 | Toshiba Satellite R15-S822 Tablet PC

1 Answer

Thanks for the "comeback" buddy. I have tried quite a few things, such as swapping the drive for Primary to Secondary (I have an OS on another drive, and therefore I don't have to use the bad drive as a...


Well Frank I'll try my best , first off XP doesn't like dual OS installed in a comp running 2 OS , an internal slave is a storage HDD having an OS installed on that HDD will cause conflicts to the C; drive the drive that is running through the windows registry if the slave drive use to run through the OS registry then it remembers that it wasn't static and the image that was placed on it by the OS , in short try making sure its set to slave turn on the computer , if you are having problems turning on windows since the slave is corrupt try putting it in a drive enclosure and turn it on after the computer has booted all the way then turn on the external to retrieve your data , the whole problem started when you booted up you computer with 2 HDD running an OS

Feb 02, 2010 | Seagate (ST3120026A-RK) 120 GB Hard Drive

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My mother board has Sata Ports. and IDE Ports.. i replace my Pata drive with a Sata Drive..The bios will see it, but will not access it.. so i put the drive in my other computer and loaded up windows 7 on...


With the drive came an instruction manual.In it it gave you some bridge pins,you use the bridge pins to change your drives so the computer recognises one as "Master" and the other as "Slave".Without the pins the computer will see the first drive first and the second as storage and will not boot from it.You need the pins bridged according to the instructions provided.Even your drive installation disk gave you these instructions.If you still have problems try unplugging the second drive,then boot up.Windows will then boot from the new drive.

Jan 10, 2010 | Computers & Internet

3 Answers

I have three seperate physical hard disks (c:, d: and f:), and windows xp is installed on c: and d: . when i boot up there is a screen asking me to choose which to boot from. I currently only use the one...


okay you will need to put a boot record on the other drives see the boot record is on C to boot from D and so forth so what you can do is this from command prompt type is "sys mbr", if that does not work you will need to remount the drive using a disk manger software like spinright, and so forth or simply creating a bootable partition under disk admiistration under the control panel.

I hope this does help.

Thanks for using fixya.com please do leave postive ratings for your free answer today.

Nov 17, 2009 | Dell Inspiron 3800 Celeron 500MHZ...

1 Answer

HI my sons acer travel/mate 6292 has crashed and will not boot up, the screen is black but its stating the NTLDR is missing and asking to press ctrl,alt, and delete to restart, yet when I do this it goes...


Hi tracey,

Cause for the NTLDR missing:
  1. Computer is booting from a non-bootable source.
  2. Computer hard disk drive is not properly setup in BIOS.
  3. Corrupt NTLDR and/or NTDETECT.COM file.
  4. Misconfiguration with the boot.ini file.
  5. Attempting to upgrade from a Windows 95, 98, or ME computer that is using FAT32.
  6. New hard disk drive being added.
  7. Corrupt boot sector / master boot record.
  8. Seriously corrupted version of Windows 2000 or Windows XP.
  9. Loose or Faulty IDE/EIDE hard disk drive cable. are
Solutions:

Computer is booting from a non-bootable source


Windows XP users
  1. Insert the Windows XP bootable CD into the computer.
  2. When prompted to press any key to boot from the CD, press any key.
  3. Once in the Windows XP setup menu press the "R" key to repair Windows.
  4. Log into your Windows installation by pressing the "1" key and pressing enter.
  5. You will then be prompted for your administrator password, enter that password.
  6. Copy the below two files to the root directory of the primary hard disk. In the below example we are copying these files from the CD-ROM drive letter, which in this case is "e." This letter may be different on your computer.

    copy e:\i386\ntldr c:\
    copy e:\i386\ntdetect.com c:\

  7. Once both of these files have been successfully copied, remove the CD from the computer and reboot.
Misconfiguration with the boot.ini file

Edit the boot.ini on the root directory of the hard disk drive and verify that it is pointing to the correct location of your Windows operating system and that the partitions are properly defined. Additional information about the boot.ini can be found on document CH000492.
Attempting to upgrade from a Windows 95, 98, or ME computer that is using FAT32
If you are getting this error message while you are attempting to upgrade to Windows 2000 or Windows XP from Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows ME running FAT32 please try the below recommendations.
  1. Boot the computer with a Windows 95, Windows 98 or Windows ME bootable diskette.
  2. At the A:\> prompt type:

    sys c: <press enter>

  3. After pressing enter you should receive the "System Transferred" message. Once this has been completed remove the floppy diskette and reboot the computer.
New hard disk drive being added

If you are attempting to add a new hard disk drive to the computer make sure that drive is a blank drive. Adding a new hard disk drive to a computer that already has Windows installed on it may cause the NTLDR error to occur.
If you are unsure if the new drive is blank or not try booting from a bootable diskette and format the new hard disk drive.
Corrupt boot sector / master boot record
It's possible your computer's hard disk drive may have a corrupt boot sector and/or master boot record. These can be repaired through the Microsoft Windows Recovery console by running the fixboot and fixmbr commands.
Additional information and help in getting into the Microsoft Windows Recovery console can be found on document CH000627.

Seriously corrupted version of Windows 2000 or Windows XP

If you have tried each of the above recommendations that apply to your situation and you continue to experience this issue it is possible you may have a seriously corrupted version of Microsoft Windows. Therefore we would recommend you reinstall Microsoft Windows 2000 and Windows XP.
If you are encountering this issue during your setup you may wish to completely erase your computer hard disk drive and all of its existing data and then install Microsoft Windows 2000 / Windows XP. Additional information about erasing the computer and starting over can be found on document CH000186.

Loose or Faulty IDE/EIDE hard disk drive cable
This issue has been known to be caused by a loose or fault IDE/EIDE cable. If the above recommendation does not resolve your issue and your computer hard disk drive is using an IDE or EIDE interface. Verify the computer hard disk drive cable is firmly connected by disconnected and reconnecting the cable.
If the issue continues it is also a possibility that the computer has a faulty cable, try replacing the hard disk drive cable with another cable and/or a new cable.
ENJOY! RATE THIS SOLUTION RNJ VINOD KUMAR

Jul 03, 2009 | Acer Aspire 5610-4648 Notebook

1 Answer

Hard drive problem


Although I covered most of the ways to speed up Windows boot time in another article, I encountered a unique roadblock recently that made me write this article. 
During the last week I was asked by a customer to upgrade one of their office computers from Windows 98SE to Windows XP. Normally this is pretty standard, however because their current hard drive was only a 20GB with a gig or so remaining I wanted to upgrade their hard drive as well. 

I proceeded to ghost the drive to a larger hard drive and then installed an upgrade version of Windows XP on top of Windows 98 to preserve all of their settings and programs.

Everything went flawlessly, until I was finished...

  


After I completed the Windows XP upgrade, I shut down the computer completely and restarted it. The computer took FOREVER to boot into Windows XP. It was literally 2 minutes before I saw the Windows XP logo screen and another 30 seconds more before the desktop appeared. This was definitely a problem. 

After checking multiple settings in the BIOS, I compared the old and new hard drives. Everything seemed to be normal, except one. The old hard drive was setup to Cable Select and as my normal routine I had set the new hard drive as a Master drive. I changed the new hard drive to Cable Select, rebooted the computer, and the Windows logo screen came on seconds after the POST screen as before. Therefore, I have to add one more item to my list of ways to make Windows boot faster. Try changing the hard drive from Master to Cable Select, check the boot up speed and switch back to Master if you don't see a change.

Master/Slave Settings

Now for a refresher course on hard drive connections. When connecting more than one hard drive to a computer on the same IDE controller, you generally have to assign one as the primary (master) and one as the secondary (slave). You do this by changing the jumpers on the hard drive next to the power connector. Normally, the drive will have a diagram to let you know which jumper should be set for a master drive and which to set for a slave drive. You'll notice in the picture below the jumpers are circled on the end of the drive and the top of the drive shows the diagram to follow.



After changing the jumpers, connect the hard drive cable from the motherboard to the hard drives. Under normal circumstances, the end of the drive cable attaches to the Master hard drive, while the inside connector on the cable connects to the Slave drive. 

What About Cable Select?

Cable Select (CS) settings were designed to make it easier to connect hard drives because you didn't need to bother with setting the Master/Slave jumpers. You just connect the drives and depending on where you connected them to the cable the computer would know which is Master and which is Slave...in theory. Now comes the confusing part.

With cable select, you first needed a special 40 conductor IDE cable that would determine master/slave connections. This was different from the normal IDE cables at the time. Also, the Master connector on CS cables was the inside connector not the end connector. This made for a very confusing switch from everyday master/slave configurations.

80 conductor Ultra DMA cables WILL determine the Master/Slave settings through Cable Select however. So as technology advances, Cable Select as a concept may still catch on. With the newer Ultra DMA cables, you can set both drives to Cable Select (CS), connect them and they will work. Another change with the 80 conductor cables, the Master connector is on the end of the cable where it should be. In situations where you are using a newer Ultra DMA drive and cable, you can use Cable Select or standard Master/Slave jumper settings and the drive will boot properly.

In my scenario to start this article, the change from Master/Slave to Cable Select for this particular computer reduced the Windows boot time by more than 2 minutes.

For more information on Master/Slave settings versus Cable Select visit the following pages:

Mike's Hardware: How to Connect IDE Hard Drives

Configuration using Cable Select

UnixWiz.Net: Using IDE Cable Select

Oct 18, 2008 | Computers & Internet

3 Answers

Hard drive


hi dear

use a cd booting

in command prompt c:\
type c:\fdisk /mbr
to fix your master boot record\

fdisk
and make your partiiton active.

after that installing your windows XP

oke


cropp

Mar 15, 2008 | Maxtor Hard Drive

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