Question about Nikon EM 35mm SLR Camera

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Exposure button stuck and will not work

Nike manual FTN

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  • Anonymous May 24, 2009

    same

  • Timm Chapman
    Timm Chapman May 11, 2010

    This is likely a sign that your battery is dead. Have you tried replacing it with a fresh one?



    I am assuming it is a Nikkormat FTN, since you didn't specify whether it is a Nikn F with an FTn meter or a Nikkormat or Nikomat FTN.

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Depress & hold the button near the film speed dial and set the dial to 60 or 90 which ever speed it shows in a different color than the others as seen. This make unlock the shutter

Posted on Mar 07, 2009

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What type of exposure system does it have?


The N2000 has Program, Program Hi, Aperture-priority, and Manual exposure modes, with exposure lock and exposure compensation capabilities. It can TTL auto and manual with flash. The meter is full-aperture and center-weighted.
The Program mode sets both the shutter speed and aperture for optimum exposure. You can adjust the exposure if you want to emphasize shutter speed or aperture. The Program Hi mode tries to set a higher shutter speed for action and/or long lenses.
You can download a copy of the manual here if you want to know more about this camera.

Feb 14, 2011 | Nikon N2000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

What does the shutter speed set on?


To set the shutter speed, press and hold the mode button and then turn the thumb wheel on the right until M (for fully manual control) or S (for shutter priority auto exposure) appears in the display. Remove your finger from the mode button and the thumb wheel will now adjust just the shutter speed. If you're in manual mode the aperture setting will need a separate adjustment for correct exposure, if you're in shutter priority mode the camera will select the aperture suited to your shutter speed for each exposure.

Please take a moment to rate my answer, or if you wish to know anything else please add a follow-up comment and I shall provide further assistance when I'm next online (I'm in the UK and it's just after midnight right now).

Sep 04, 2010 | Nikon N8008 AF 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

This is kind of embarassing... i received an old nikon f65, and i don't know how to remove the film properly without burning it...


The film should rewind automatically at the end of the roll. If it doesn't, press the two film-rewind buttons simultaneously for about one second. The film rewind buttons are maked with a red film icon; one is also the exposure compensation button to the right of the LCD control panel, the other is the auto exposure bracketing button to the left of the viewfinder.

Once the film is rewound, turn the power off. Slide the release lever on the left end of the body, and the back should pop open a little.

You can download the manual from
http://butkus.org/chinon/nikon/nikon_n65/nikon_n65.htm

Aug 23, 2010 | Nikon F65 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

How do I change the shutter speed on a Nikon EM film SLR


The EM doesn't really have a manual shutter speed setting. It does have a Bulb setting for long exposures and a 1/90 second manual for flash, but otherwise the camera automatically sets the shutter speed to go with the currently selected aperture.

Normally you would set the aperture and let the camera set the shutter speed. You can adjust the shutter speed by pressing the exposure compensation button for +2 stops. You can also adjust the exposure by changing the ASA/ISO setting.

If you need a manual, you can download one from http://butkus.org/chinon/nikon/nikon_em/nikon_em.htm

Jun 29, 2010 | Nikon EM 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Can't roll film for double exposure.


After taking the first shot, hold down the Multi-Exposure button while cocking the film-advance lever. This cocks the shutter without winding the film. You can continue to do this for as many exposures as you want. Just don't hold down the M-E button while cocking after the last exposure.

The Multi-Exposure button is the button on the front of the camera just below the shutter release button.

Apr 11, 2010 | Vivitar V3800N 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I can't change the aperture setting or time value in all (tv, av, M) modes - turning the wheel only changes the exposure compensation (-2 to 2) scale. Nothing else changes. I've read the manual a million...


Hello,

Try this.

Turn the command dial on the top of the camera to [AV]
Use the [main dial] next to the shutter button to adjust the aperture.

The rear button that is round that is marked 'Av +/-' is the shift button. This controls the exposure compensation.

Could you be turning the wrong wheel?

Hope this helps.

Feb 25, 2010 | Canon EOS Rebel 2000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Have a Canon AE-1 Program that I've received yesterday.. while taking it out for a shoot, a problem occured: Everytime I would Advance the lever to the next exposure it would take a photograph as if the...


Camera has a bad magnet, the A series were plagued by this.
Repairs will cost more than probably what it's worth.
The AE-1's used an electromagnet system to activate the shutter for a smoother press and less shake from the camera system.

I got lucky and recently purchased an AE-1 program that doesn't have this problem, it seems to be a hit and miss with these.

Oct 17, 2009 | Canon EOS-AE-1 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Pentax SF10 Camera -- double exposure


If you press the film release button like you are going to rewind exposed film you may be able to activate the film advance lever to cock the camera so you can take another picture, and the film should stay on the first exposure allowing you to re - expose it. I would underexpose each image 1 F stop because.you are exposing the same film twice. Double exposures are always an iffy proposition and anything can happen. After the second exposure cocking the film advance should allow the film to advance once again. You might test this on the final pictures on a roll in case the camera won't start advancing the film after you try it. This way you won't blow a whole roll worth of pictures testing it.

Apr 12, 2009 | Pentax PZ-70 QD 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Forget how to take double pictures.


Hey xplaur,
To take a multiexposure photograph you should first expose the film, and then push the multiexposure button which is on the front of the camera on the top left when you are looking at the front of the camera. After you press this button advance the winding lever to set the shutter, and since the multiexposure button was pressed this shouldn't wind the film to the next frame. Now take your second exposure, and if you want to make another exposure on the same frame repeat the process. Keep in mind that every time you expose a single frame after the initial exposure you will be doubling the exposure on the frame. I usually under expose each exposure by one third on a double exposed frame. If you do more than two exposures I would underexpose each exposure by even more. Multi exposures are fun but tricky, and I would suggest you experiment and have fun with it. I will also say that black and white film is much more controllable and forgiving when it comes to this than color film. I hope this helps!

Sincerely,
Allan
Go Ahead. Use Us.

Jul 31, 2008 | Vivitar V3800N 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Turn it on


Actually, you don't have to "turn on" the Vivitar V3800N. Just be sure it has working batteries in it (takes two small alkaline button cells, unscrew the cover on the bottom with a coin--put new cells into the holder with the + side up). If the batteries are working, when you press the shutter button halfway down, you should see an LED light up in the right side of the viewfinder. This is the readout for the exposure meter: a red + indicates overexposure, red - is underexposure, a green dot means you've got the exposure correctly set. You just change the shutter and aperture settings until you get the green light, then shoot. When you load film, you also need to set the ISO film speed setting. Pull up on the outside ring of the shutter speed dial and turn it until the number in the window is the same as the ISO number on the film you are using. The batteries, by the way, only power the exposure meter. The shutter is fully mechanical (just like in the good old days), so you can use the camera without batteries if you have a separate exposure meter, or if you can estimate exposure. Film loading is about like any other 35mm manual camera: pull up on the rewind knob to open the back; insert the new cassette of film on the left and pull the film leader out a couple inches and hook the film to the takeup reel on the right. Move the film advance lever a bit to be sure the film is firmly hooked onto the reel, then close the back. Wind and shoot three shots to get the exposed film leader out of the way, and then start shooting. When the film is finished, press in the rewind button on the bottom of the camera and rewind the film into the cassette before opening the back of the camera. Good luck--these are pretty good little cameras. We buy a lot of them for the photography program where I teach, and I've only ever had one with a problem (meter was bad). The lenses are quite good, and they are "K-mount," which means that any Pentax bayonet lens, and gazillions of others with this mount, will all fit. --Michael R. Sawdey

Sep 03, 2007 | Vivitar V3800N Zoom 35mm SLR Camera

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