Question about Compaq MS Pocket PC 2002

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My ipaq would not start

My brother has an hp ipaq 2003, unknowingly I restored his backup file(registry files) on my compaq ipaq 2002 to get some programs. What happened was that my ipaq only displays a single page that has the version and model name. How can I get it started?

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Re: my ipaq would not start

As xveronicax has said get the model then the hard reset will do

Posted on Jul 11, 2007

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Re: my ipaq would not start

Hello gonchero, Can you please specify which model Ipaq you have? (I'm not familiar with the Ipaq 2003, so I think you're referring to the Operating System version, or something along those lines). Either way, a 'Hard Reset' will probably get you back up and running. Once you tell me which model you have (located on the back of the ipaq), I can give you the steps for doing a hard reset for it.

Posted on Apr 06, 2007

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My compaq presario recovery cd ask for A:>>what is

Desktop or Laptop ????....
Unfortunately, it is likely that your computer will encounter some form of system error, malware function or hard-drive crash that causes the operating system to become unstable.
To help computer users resolve these issues, HP includes the HP Recovery Manager in each Compaq Presario.
Use the Recovery Manager to recover your system without the need for any additional software CDs, technical support or repair service.
The recovery process should only be used as a last step in troubleshooting your computer, as all personal data files will be erased during the recovery.

Close any programs running on your computer and remove any unnecessary hardware devices that are connected to the computer.
Restart the computer. Press the "F11" key once your computer begins to start up again and before the Windows logo appears.
The HP Recovery Manager will automatically launch.
Click the "System Recovery" option and click "Next." Select "No" in the Microsoft restore window that opens and click "Next."
Select the "Backup Your Files First" option and connect an external hard drive or insert a blank DVD or CD to store the backup files.
Follow the instructions in the wizard to select the files you want to save.
Click "Next" to begin the restore process.
The Recovery Manager will reformat the hard drives and recover the system to a functional operating condition. - RestoreWithoutWindows

Jan 19, 2012 | Compaq Operating Systems

2 Answers

Missing plug-inn?i want to restore

Title:missing plug-inn?i want to restore

If you set a restore point then do as --
To set a System Restore Point...
  • Open the Start menu
  • Open the Programs menu
  • Open the Accessories menu
  • Open the System Tools menu
  • Finally, start System Restore
  • Pick the option for setting a System Restore Point and click on the Next button
  • Fill in a name for the restore point so you can find it and click on the Create button
  • Click on the Close button when done
In Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7, if booting all the way into normal mode causes problems, such as features that don't work, freezes, etc., it is possible to backdate Windows itself to an earlier state when it was working properly by restoring a restore point created automatically or manually by or in System Restore.
You should know that System Restore does not back up and restore non-system files or third-party software or any changes made by such software. It also does not involve restoring the data files on the computer. Only the essential files required to get Windows running are involved in the creation of its dated restore points that take the system files back to the date on which a particular restore point was created. Nor does System Restore clean up files left over by a botched software installation, which is a common cause of corrupted system files, and it can't be used to restore selectively files that have been accidentally erased. In other words, System Restore is a very handy tool that has saved my PCs on numerous occasions, but it is not a substitute for a full system backup, such as the creation of a disk image of the system, and should never be relied upon as such.

May 07, 2011 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional

2 Answers

The registry cannot load the hive file ?

backup the current hive file, and copy the hive file from repair folder to the config folder, that would solve the problem

Aug 27, 2009 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

2 Answers

Vista Premium 64 - Windows Update Recently (within the last month) a stand alone laptop with Vista 64 Premium installed stopped beign able to receive updates via Microsoft's Windows Update. The intial...

Have you tried enabling automatic updates manually? Is this a clean copy of windows?(Please don't take offense) oherwise install and run SUPERantispyware scan and clean if nothing the send me an e-mail at

Jul 05, 2009 | Operating Systems

1 Answer

Corrupted Registry in Win98SE + Cannot fix.

Try this. Been a long time since I used a command prompt but it should work. If you can get to the boot menu use a start up floppy.

Restoring a Backup

Reboot your computer, press F8 to enter Windows Boot options. Start your computer with Command Prompt ONLY.

To restore your most recent backup.
At the command prompt type --> scanreg /restore and hit enter.

To choose a backup to restore.

Go to the \Windows\Command directory.
Run SCANREG /restore
Select which one you want to restore.

May 21, 2009 | Microsoft Windows 98 Second Edition for PC

2 Answers

What happens if we delete hidden directory system volume informat

Hidden directories most often serve to hide important operating system-related files and user preferences. This is mostly to protect the files. But malicious programs (malware, viruses, trojans) can also use this functionality to hide their presence.

The System Volume Information folder is a hidden system folder that the System Restore tool uses to store its information and restore points. System Volume Information (SVI) is the name of the data store where Windows XP and Windows Vista keeps its System Restore files and registration databases. System Restore not only saves copies of critical system files, it also performs automated registry hive backup.

There is one SVI folder per drive being monitored by System Restore. You can not view/access the SVI folder by default but there is a way to make them visible. You might need to gain access to this folder for troubleshooting purposes.

Basically, if you delete the System Volume Information folder, you will no longer have the files and data needed to restore your system to a previous state. For example, if Windows crashes or is stuck in a continuous boot cycle, you can use System Restore to restore your system to a previous "healthy" state. However, if there are no files or registry backups available, this tool is then no longer available to you. Also, if you ever decided to use System Restore, you would need to re-create the foler in the same path so that the system files can be stored there again.

Hopefully, you backup your system and keep good backups often...

Apr 13, 2009 | Microsoft Operating Systems

2 Answers

How do i get rid of a W32.SillyFDC virus

The following instructions pertain to all current and recent Symantec antivirus products, including the Symantec AntiVirus and Norton AntiVirus product lines.
  1. Disable System Restore (Windows Me/XP).
  2. Update the virus definitions.
  3. Run a full system scan.
  4. Delete any values added to the registry.

For specific details on each of these steps, read the following instructions.

1. To disable System Restore (Windows Me/XP)
If you are running Windows Me or Windows XP, we recommend that you temporarily turn off System Restore. Windows Me/XP uses this feature, which is enabled by default, to restore the files on your computer in case they become damaged. If a virus, worm, or Trojan infects a computer, System Restore may back up the virus, worm, or Trojan on the computer.

Windows prevents outside programs, including antivirus programs, from modifying System Restore. Therefore, antivirus programs or tools cannot remove threats in the System Restore folder. As a result, System Restore has the potential of restoring an infected file on your computer, even after you have cleaned the infected files from all the other locations.

Also, a virus scan may detect a threat in the System Restore folder even though you have removed the threat.

For instructions on how to turn off System Restore, read your Windows documentation, or one of the following articles:

Note: When you are completely finished with the removal procedure and are satisfied that the threat has been removed, reenable System Restore by following the instructions in the aforementioned documents.

For additional information, and an alternative to disabling Windows Me System Restore, see the Microsoft Knowledge Base article: Antivirus Tools Cannot Clean Infected Files in the _Restore Folder (Article ID: Q263455).

2. To update the virus definitions
Symantec Security Response fully tests all the virus definitions for quality assurance before they are posted to our servers. There are two ways to obtain the most recent virus definitions:
  • Running LiveUpdate, which is the easiest way to obtain virus definitions.

    If you use Norton AntiVirus 2006, Symantec AntiVirus Corporate Edition 10.0, or newer products, LiveUpdate definitions are updated daily. These products include newer technology.

    If you use Norton AntiVirus 2005, Symantec AntiVirus Corporate Edition 9.0, or earlier products, LiveUpdate definitions are updated weekly. The exception is major outbreaks, when definitions are updated more often.

  • Downloading the definitions using the Intelligent Updater: The Intelligent Updater virus definitions are posted daily. You should download the definitions from the Symantec Security Response Web site and manually install them.

The latest Intelligent Updater virus definitions can be obtained here: Intelligent Updater virus definitions. For detailed instructions read the document: How to update virus definition files using the Intelligent Updater.

3. To run a full system scan
  1. Start your Symantec antivirus program and make sure that it is configured to scan all the files.

    For Norton AntiVirus consumer products: Read the document: How to configure Norton AntiVirus to scan all files.

    For Symantec AntiVirus Enterprise products: Read the document: How to verify that a Symantec Corporate antivirus product is set to scan all files.

  2. Run a full system scan.
  3. If any files are detected, follow the instructions displayed by your antivirus program.
  4. Delete the autorun.inf file from writeable removable devices, if necessary.
Important: If you are unable to start your Symantec antivirus product or the product reports that it cannot delete a detected file, you may need to stop the risk from running in order to remove it. To do this, run the scan in Safe mode. For instructions, read the document, How to start the computer in Safe Mode. Once you have restarted in Safe mode, run the scan again.

After the files are deleted, restart the computer in Normal mode and proceed with the next section.

Warning messages may be displayed when the computer is restarted, since the threat may not be fully removed at this point. You can ignore these messages and click OK. These messages will not appear when the computer is restarted after the removal instructions have been fully completed. The messages displayed may be similar to the following:

Title: [FILE PATH]
Message body: Windows cannot find [FILE NAME]. Make sure you typed the name correctly, and then try again. To search for a file, click the Start button, and then click Search.

4. To delete the value from the registry
Important: Symantec strongly recommends that you back up the registry before making any changes to it. Incorrect changes to the registry can result in permanent data loss or corrupted files. Modify the specified subkeys only. For instructions refer to the document: How to make a backup of the Windows registry.
  1. Click Start > Run.
  2. Type regedit
  3. Click OK.

    Note: If the registry editor fails to open the threat may have modified the registry to prevent access to the registry editor. Security Response has developed a tool to resolve this problem. Download and run this tool, and then continue with the removal.

  4. Navigate to the following registry subkeys:

    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Shell Folders
    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Windows\"load"

  5. In the right pane, delete any values associated with the worm.

  6. Exit the Registry Editor.

Dec 18, 2008 | Microsoft Operating Systems

2 Answers

The File Replication Service has detected that the replica set "DOMAIN SYSTEM VOLUME (SYSVOL SHARE)" is in JRNL_WRAP_ERROR.

Make sure and keep copies of all the folders and files.
Take these actions to resolve your problem:
On all Active Directory registered domain controllers:
1. Stop NETLOGON Service
2. Stop File Replication Service (NTFRS)
On the PDC Emulator:
1. Rename all files in the %systemroot%\ntfrs folder and subfolders (change their extension to .old).
2. Give an unlisted account full control of the directory %systemroot%\SYSVOL folder and reset permissions on all child objects.
3. Change the registry key:
HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\ntfrs\paramaters\Backup/Restore\Process at Startup\BurFlags (REG_DWORD) = D4 (The default on this is 0)
4. Start the NETLOGON Service
5. Start the NTFRS Service
On all non-PDC emulators:
1. Change the registry key:
HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\ntfrs\paramaters\Backup/Restore\Process at Startup\BurFlags (REG_DWORD) = D2
2. Start the NETLOGON Service
3. Start the File Replication Service (NTFRS)
At this point, the system in question should have recreated the SYSVOL share and the NETLOGON share. Check this by running 'net share' from a command prompt. You should also see the Group Policy Objects listed in the SYSVOL directory as:
There may be more directories listed here, but these are the Default Domain Policy and the Default Domain Controllers Policy that are installed by default when the Active Directory is created. If these are being replicated, then file replication is functioning.
If you cannot find these directories, then you may have to manually recreate them. Here is a list of the proper directory structure of the %systemroot%\SYSVOL folder:
________\staging areas
________\sysvol (shared as SYSVOL)
________________________\Scripts (shared as NETLOGON)
If you have to manually recreate the directories, restart the File Replication Service (NTFRS) on all domain controllers to re-enable replication. This should get the file replication functioning normally

Apr 25, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

1 Answer

Backup DHCP,AD of win 2000 .

How To Use the Backup Program to Back Up and Restore the System State in Windows 2000 var sectionFilter = "type != 'notice' && type != 'securedata' && type != 'querywords'"; var tocArrow = "/library/images/support/kbgraphics/public/en-us/downarrow.gif"; var depthLimit = 10; var depth3Limit = 10; var depth4Limit = 5; var depth5Limit = 3; var tocEntryMinimum = 1; .toc{display: none;} SUMMARY loadTOCNode(1, 'summary'); This article describes how you can optionally back up the system state in the Windows 2000 Backup program to back up and restore critical system data. When you choose to back up the system state on a domain controller, the following items are included: • Active Directory (NTDS) • The boot files • The COM+ class registration database • The registry • The system volume (SYSVOL)When you back up the system state on a non-domain controller, the following items are included: • The Boot file • The COM+ class registration database • The registryWhen you back up a member server or domain controller with Certificate Server installed, the following additional item is also included: • Certificate ServerWindows 2000 Backup can back up and restore Active Directory on Windows 2000 domain controllers. You can perform a backup operation while the domain controller is online. You can perform a restore operation only when the domain controller is booted into Directory Services Restore mode (by pressing the F8 key when the server is booting).

uparrow.gifBack to the top
How to Back Up the System State on a Domain Controller loadTOCNode(2, 'summary'); 1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Backup. 2. Click the Backup tab. 3. Click to select the System State check box. (All of the components to be backed up are listed in the right pane. You cannot individually select each item.)

NOTE: During the system state backup, you must select to back up the Winnt\Sysvol folder. You must also select this option during the restore operation to have a working sysvol after the recovery.The following information applies only to domain controllers. You can restore member servers the same way, but in normal mode.

If any of the following conditions are not met, the system state is not restored. Backup attempts to restore the system state, but does not succeed. • The drive letter on which the %SystemRoot% folder is located must be the same as when it was backed up. • The %SystemRoot% folder must be the same folder as when it was backed up. • If sysvol or other Active Directory databases were located on another volume, they must exist and have the same drive letters also. The size of the volume does not matter. uparrow.gifBack to the top
How to Restore the System State on a Domain Controller loadTOCNode(2, 'summary'); 1. To restore the system state on a domain controller, first start the computer in Directory Services Restore Mode. To do so, restart the computer and press the F8 key when you see the Boot menu. 2. Choose Directory Services Restore Mode. 3. Choose the Windows 2000 installation you are going to recover, and then press ENTER. 4. At the logon prompt, supply the Directory Services Restore mode credentials you supplied during the Dcpromo.exe process. 5. Click OK to acknowledge that you are using Safe mode. 6. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Backup. 7. Click the Restore tab. 8. Click the appropriate backup media and the system state to restore.

NOTE: During the restore operation, the Winnt\Sysvol folder must also be selected to be restored to have a working sysvol after the recovery process. Be sure that the advanced option to restore "junction points and data" is also selected prior to the restore. This ensures that sysvol junction points are re-created. 9. In the Restore Files to box, click Original Location.

NOTE: When you choose to restore a file to an alternative location or to a single file, not all system state data is restored. These options are used mostly for boot files or registry keys. 10. Click Start Restore. 11. After the restore process is finished, restart the computer.

Dec 02, 2007 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

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