Question about Intel Celeron, 600 MHz (SL46U) Processor

2 Answers

How do I overclock a Celeron 733mHz PGA370?

I have an old computer and I'm too poor to get a new one. My motherboard doesn't have any jumpers to set speeds for my Intel Celeron PGA370. I want to overclock it to the maximum speed that it goes. Is there some way I can overclock the processor using a Windows program?

Processor:
Celeron PGA370 733mHz

Computer Model:
HP Pavilion 6746C

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  • Anonymous Jan 17, 2009

    Geardawg again. Response to rtahn.

    I have a PhoenixBIOS chip and it doesn't show anything like that. There are no jumpers on the board. I could get a new computer, but I'm poor as a homeless person (not really, LOL).

    There's is no progam for windows I could use this overclock it?

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I have a hp 6730 ,originally a celeron 600mhz... which currently runs at 1.1 gig ,i used a 733 celeron and a linlin adapter . the lin lin is jumpered to let the clock speed go to 100 mhz.. . the only reason it can be overclocked is "the chipset.."it controls the max speed .and the 810 or 815 will max out ... 733/ 66=11 x 100= 1.1gig 733 x 11=800.. but it may go higher .. this computer is a hp6730 with a 733 celeron and a 256 and 128 meg pc 133 memory ... i had to tinker with it for a while the lin lin jumpers "voltage" are critical .as is the placement of the memory ,, go slowly first the overclocking then the mem location..

Posted on May 09, 2009

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You can only overclock your computer if it has ATAPI BIOS. So get into BIOS upon bootup and if you have ATAPI then it will say it across the top. It will also have a section for the CPU with the current speed and an option to change it.

Posted on Dec 22, 2008

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I cant overclock my system but i go to bios now whati had to do


The BIOS. Overclocking is best done in the computer's BIOS (Basic Input/Output System or Binary Integrated Operating System). There are also some motherboards that let you do a basic increase in power by setting a jumper, but this is dangerous and you have no real stability control.


There are some software programs available which allow you to overclock inside the operating system, but the best results are achieved by changing BIOS settings. Usually you can get into your BIOS by pressing DEL (some systems may use F2, F10, or Ctrl-Enter) as soon as your computer begins the POST

(Power On Self Test - when it shows the RAM size, processor speed, etc.).


Here, you can change your FSB (front side bus), memory timings, and your CPU multiplier (also referred to as CPU Clock Ratio).

Clearing your CMOS. Sometimes, an overclock can become unstable. If this happens, or your computer will not boot, you will need to reset the BIOS back to default and start over again.


This is done by clearing the CMOS (a small piece of memory on the motherboard which stores your BIOS configuration, and is powered by a small battery). Some newer motherboards will bypass user settings in the CMOS if the computer fails POST (often caused by a faulty overclock). However, most motherboards require a manual clear.


This can be done in two ways, depending on your motherboard. The first way is by changing the position of the clear CMOS jumper on your motherboard, waiting a few minutes, then repositioning the jumper to its original place.


The CMOS Jumper

The second way, if your motherboard doesn't have this jumper, consists of unplugging your computer, removing the little CMOS battery, then pressing the power button (your capacitors will discharge), and waiting a couple of minutes.


Then you have to refit the battery and plug in your computer. Once your CMOS is cleared, all BIOS settings are reset back to default and you'll have to start the overclocking process all over again. Just so you know, this step is only necessary if your overclock becomes unstable.


Locked or Unlocked. The first thing to know when you start the process of overclocking, is whether your processor is multiplier locked or unlocked.

To check whether your CPU is locked, lower your multiplier via the BIOS one step, for example from 11 to 10.5. Save and exit your BIOS and your computer will restart.


If your computer posts again and shows the new CPU speed, it means your CPU is unlocked. However, if your computer failed to post (screen remains black) or no CPU speed change is present, this means your multiplier is locked


Multiplier Unlocked Processors. Usually, your max overclock is limited by your memory, or RAM. A good starting place is to find the top memory bus speed in which your memory can handle while keeping it in sync with the FSB. To check this, lower your CPU multiplier some steps (from 11 to 9, for example) and increase your FSB a few notches (e.g.: 200 MHz to 205 MHz).


After this, save and exit your BIOS. There are a few ways to test for stability.

If you make it into Windows, that is a good start. You can try running a few CPU / RAM intensive programs to stress these components. Some good examples are SiSoft Sandra, Prime95, Orthos, 3DMark 2006 and Folding@Home.


You may also choose to run a program outside of Windows, such as Memtest. Load a copy of Memtest onto a bootable floppy, then insert the disk after you have exited the BIOS.

Continue to increase your FSB until Memtest starts reporting errors. When this happens, you can try to increase the voltage supplied to your memory.


Do note that increasing voltages may shorten the life span of your memory. Also, another option is to loosen the timings on the memory (more on this a bit later). The previous FSB setting before the error will be your max FSB. Your max FSB will fully depend on what memory you have installed. Quality, name-brand memory will work best for overclocking.


Now that you know your max FSB, you'll figure out your max multiplier. Keeping your FSB @ stock, you raise your multiplier one step at a time. Each time you restart, check for system stability. As mentioned above, one good way to do this is by running Prime95.


If it doesn't post (reread the section about clearing the CMOS), or Prime 95 fails, you can try to raise the core voltage a bit. Increasing it may or may not increase stability. On the other hand, the temperature will also be increased. If you are going to increase the core voltage, you should keep an eye on temperatures, at least for a few minutes.


Also note that increasing voltages may shorten the life span of your CPU, not to mention void your warranty. When your computer is no longer stable at a given multiplier setting, lower your multiplier one step and take that as your max multiplier.


Now that you have your max FSB speed and your max multiplier, you can play around and determine the best settings for your system. Do note that having a higher FSB overclock as opposed to a higher multiplier will have a greater impact on overall system performance.


http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/news/index.cfm?newsid=107977


hope this helps

May 30, 2012 | Computers & Internet

Tip

MAKING YOUR COMPUTER OPERATE VERY FAST & SECURED THROUGH CPU OVERCLOCKING


NOTE: OVERCLOCKING COMPUTER CPU MAKES IT PERFORM FASTER ABOVE THE FACTORY SET LEVEL, BEFORE OVERCLOCKING, READ THE GUIDE BELOW, AND VIEW THE SOFTWARE APPROACH HERE OPEN

drbrightirem.jpgOverclocking a processor means enabling it to operate above the manufacturer's specified frequency. Many internet sites provide instructions for overclocking. Processor manufacturers and many computer experts believe the slight gain in performance (only perceivable on CPU-intensive software) isn't worth the expense or considerable risk.

  • Get whatever tools you need: screwdriver, needle-nose pliers, motherboard manual, cooling hardware, etc.
  • 2 Find out whether your motherboard can be adjusted in the BIOS setup, with jumpers or not at all.
  • 3 Find out clock-speed limitations of the motherboard.
  • 4 Run all Windows and any third-party diagnostic applications you have. Fix all system problems.
  • 5 Make a complete backup of your system, documents and applications you don't have on CD-ROM. Do not overwrite these copies.
  • 6 If you have a BIOS-adjustable motherboard, make changes according to your motherboard manual, and skip to Step 15.
  • 7 Shut down computer.
  • 8 Leave computer plugged in to surge suppressor.
  • 9 Disconnect all peripherals from computer.
  • 10 Remove cover of chassis.
  • 11 Ground yourself to computer with any professional grounding equipment you have. Otherwise, ground yourself by touching a metal part of the chassis.
  • 12 If your motherboard has adjustable jumpers, locate the jumpers that control the CPU speed.
  • 13 Use needle-nose pliers to change jumper settings. Move jumpers to positions indicated in your motherboard manual for the clock speed you want. Check the internet for recommendations.
  • 14 Install a CPU heat sink, heat-sink compound, and a specialty cooling fan, if appropriate and possible.
  • 15 Put system back together, and reboot.
  • 16 If computer does not boot, and CPU still works, try lowering the clock speed. If that doesn't work, restore the original configuration.
  • 17 Check all functions, and run a CPU-intensive program.


  • NOTE: OVERCLOCKING COMPUTER CPU MAKES IT PERFORM FASTER ABOVE THE FACTORY SET LEVEL, BEFORE OVERCLOCKING, READ THE GUIDE BELOW, AND VIEW THE SOFTWARE APPROACH HERE OPEN Tips & Warnings
    • CPUs have rated and maximum speeds. Exceeding the maximum speed is far more likely to cause problems than more conservative adjustments.

    • Overclocking an Intel processor explicitly voids its warranty. Other manufacturers have similar exclusions. Intel prevents overclocking of some CPUs by disabling higher multiplier settings.

    • Expect a shorter life for an overclocked processor, including the possibility of its immediate failure.

    • Prepare to deal with seemingly unrelated problems that can be caused by overclocking: destruction of other internal components, lost data, system and application crashes, and an inability to boot the system. Such problems can occur randomly or materialize well after you have altered your motherboard


    on Dec 06, 2010 | Computers & Internet

    1 Answer

    Overclocking


    There are many issues to consider when overclocking and the first is to be sure that you have extra cooling for your processor. On this motherboard I do not recommend overclocking but since ASUS says that it can be done I will try to give you some places to get information on your A7V880 system. If you do not have your user's manual, you can go to the link below and download one.
    http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/AMD_Socket_A/A7V880/#download . Leave the OVER_VOLT1 jumper on the motherboard on the default of pins 1 & 2. Refer then to section 2.4.5 on pages 2-21,22 of the User's Manual for Jumper Free configuration overclocking settings. In BIOS Setup I suggest a CPU Multiple of 10 or less. If you choose to use the AI Overclock Tuner instead, a setting of [Overclock 20%] or less would be best. The VCORE Voltage setting will depend on the specs for the CPU that you are using. If you don't know leave it at Auto. As I said before, overheating of the CPU is a problem in overclocking and you can monitor the temperature via the Hardware Monitor. Refer to section 2.5.6 on page 2-26 of the manual. Modern cpu overclocking normally does not exceed 20% safely unless you are willing to spend a lot of money on liquid cooling and frequent replacement of damaged processors. I would be interested in hearing whether you decide to overclock or continuing with your present settings.

    Nov 27, 2011 | ASUS A7V880 Motherboard

    2 Answers

    Possible overclock


    Overclocking is now set on bios.

    Just change the multipliers for desired speed, but be careful

    Jun 22, 2009 | Computers & Internet

    2 Answers

    I need to know the model of socket


    733MHz right off the bat, sounds like an Intel Pentium III processor. This processor uses the Slot 1 processor socket, (Older type), or the Socket 370.

    1.Slot 1: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slot_1
    2.Socket 370: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socket_370

    List of Intel Pentium III Microprocessors:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_Pentium_III_microprocessors

    May 22, 2009 | HP D9840-69007 - System Board Motherboard

    1 Answer

    Rampage 2 extreme motherboard is it overclock friendly?


    set the jumper properly!!! some of the motherboards there are free jumper set!!! it meeans it is defauts

    Apr 26, 2009 | Computers & Internet

    1 Answer

    Cannot use intel pentium processor


    you can only use socket 370 (Intel Celeron/Intel Pentium III) processors on that motherboard. Your maximum cpu speed is set by the bios.

    Feb 19, 2009 | Gateway PGA370 E139761 DIMM Motherboard...

    1 Answer

    BIOS problem!!


    Why do you want to overclock it? Have you changed the cooling system? Overclocking might fry your processor if the cooling cannot keep up with the heat. Does your motherboard support overclocking? The option might be locked. There might be a jumper on the board that you have to mingle in order to enable that setting.

    Sep 21, 2008 | Computers & Internet

    1 Answer

    CMOS checksum bad 0085


    the problem might lie in the fact that the mother board and cpu cannot be handled at the speed

    or it requires the jumpers to be set by so that the cpu can be clocked properly if you got a mother board spec guide follow the guide for *********** board to set up 3.2

    you might also have to set the bios to the cpu speed cause if mother board doesnt do jumpers no more the setting would be in bios
    hit the delete key direct are power up this will take you to bios
    its not the battery

    Jun 05, 2008 | Intel Motherboard

    1 Answer

    P35 Neo2 Motherboard Jumpers


    a quad Q6600 is manufactured @ .273 overclocked from the factory. at no time should this cpu ever be overclocked anymore unlessd you are using a watercooling system that keeps the cpu @ 69 degrees for stability. anything else will burn it out. lala linda

    May 31, 2008 | Intel Motherboard

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