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OVEN WARMS UP TO SLOW

TO GET THE OVEN TO WARM UP TO 350 YOU HAVE TO TURN IT ON 25 MINS IN ADVANCE . I FEEL THAT IS WAY TO SLOW. IT IS A JENN-AIR GAS RANGE T2 HAVE HAD IT SINCE SEPT. 30/01. IT SEEMED SLOW FROM NEW BUT GETTING SLOWER WITH TIME. In bake mode the electric element is all that heats up, the bottom element wont light even though the pilot is glowing red the whole time.

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6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi there,
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Jenn Air w30400b with F2 code

Since the elements are working fine, the thermostat seems to
be in question or, the contacts and connections to the thermostat
are loose etc. This seems to be a controller / temperature thermister problem and since it is intermittent, it might just be
bad contacts in that area of the circuits. see this description below.

INGLIS Royal 100 STOVE F1 F2 F3 ERRORS
Mode lUP 48500 ( thats eye you, not ONE U )

I got the dreaded F3 error on the Display Panel,
every time I pressed BAKE or BROIL, BUT, I could
hear the three relays click in, and then kick out in
sequence, just before the F3 appeared.

I called Westinghouse ( that services INGLIS ) and
was told that F3 " means unpug for 1/2 hour and then
press CLEAR 5 Seconds to reset ". Which is nonsense.

All functions on the clock and timer work fine, and the
three relays were working, so its not a computer problem.
I called service REPAIR companies who said it was the
THERMOSTAT, and replace it - $147.99 ... The Glass tube
of the display is $200 with no circuit board, the relay board
is $300 and the computer/display is $400.

I did tests on the thermostat, first heating it with a propane
lighter, and it raised from 475 Ohms at room temperature,
to 600 ohms, so I knew it was functioning.

Then, I plugged in a variable resistor where the thermostat
plugs in. I went from Zero Ohms resistance to 5000 Ohms in
200 Ohms steps.

Zero Ohms ( equal to burnt out or unplugged) gives you
an immediate F1, which you cannot clear.
From 100 Ohms to 400 Ohms, you get Error F2, which
means thermostat too low.
From 400 Ohms to 665 Ohms there is no error.
At 665 Ohms, the BAKE will beep twice, stating that you
are setting the temperature at or lower than the actual temperature
of the oven ( you cant set the oven at 200, for example, if it is
already at 450 Degrees )
Using this 2 Beep code, I raised and lowered the resistance
and made a graph of the reading on the display versus the
OHMS that the thermostat would send to the controller:
665 Ohms = 170 Degrees Farenheit, which is the
lowest reading in the BAKE MODE.
800 Ohms = 240 Degrees
1100 Ohms = 380 Degrees
1400 Ohms = 500 Degrees, which iis the maximum that
the unit showed in the BAKE MODE.
1430 Ohms to 2750 Ohms, there was no reading, an NO ERRORS.
ABOVE 2750 OHMS, the F1 ERROR appeared again, meaning
thermostat out of range.

Note that the computer module supplies 5 volts DC to the thermostat,
to see the changes in current with changing resistance.
You can easily check the thermostat to see if it is OK, with an
Ohmeter across the thermostat, which should read about 475 Ohms
at room temperature. If it reads Zero, it is burnt out. If it reads
over 2750, it is defective. Check to see if the thermistor in the
tube is SHORTED to the steel outter case as well, as this should be
infinite ohms ( no contact )- if it reads ZERO it is shorted to case.

I found that on the Internet, there are hundreds of people looking for
the F3 code for the ROYAL 100 ( model number IUP 48500 )
and a general search shows that for 400 " other" models of all kinds,
F3 = REPLACE THERMOSTAT ! Not on this model, and all typical searches
for technical support or diagrams or troubleshooting did not even list
the Royal 100 AT ALL, as if it never existed.

I then did tests on the relay board, and replaced the capacitors, a few diodes,
some resistors that were a bit out of value, and two transistors that were
a bit out of value. There was no change in F3.

I cleaned the contacts on the three relays using a typical board fingernail
file that ladies use for their finger nails ( I keep a supply for cleaning
relay contacts, since there is sandpaper on both sides, and they are
tiny enough to fit between most contacts ). THEN, I realized that the BROIL
contacts were bouncing apart - they were too far apart, and not closing
properly, so I bent the stationary contact a bit closer, and plugged in the
stove = NO ERRORS..

I analysed the circuit, and after turning on the 3 relays ( NOTE, when you
turn on BAKE, as in a regular oven, THE BROIL ELEMENT goes on at first
to quickly help the BAKE element get the oven up to temperature )
there is a feedback circuit that feeds 250 Volts back into the 5 Volt computer
chip ( ! ! ! ) It uses two 22 Meg Ohm resistors in series for a total of 44 Million
Ohms, which shows about 46 volts accross the resistors. Since the gas
tube display uses 30 volts to light up, the 46 volts is within the computer
board's ability to lower it enough to feed into the computer. There are transisors
on the back of the control board and Zener diodes etc. to " compare " the
voltage, where 46 volts in = 250, and Zero volts, means that the element
is burnt out, the element fuse in the fuse panel is burnt out, or, the relay
contacts are dirty. The relays are absolutely standard 24 volt relays,
with a plasic cover that snaps off if you pull and wiggle it. You will see
the round silver contact pads are blackened and probaly pitted.
Sand these flat until silver/brass shiny, and test to make certain that
when you press the metal lever that the magnetic coil pulls DOWN,
that the contacts touch! If they do not touch tight, bend the
stationary contact in a tiny bit and test again.

You can first check the fuses - there are two 120 volt fuses in the
fuse panel that give you 250. Then, you can unplug the stove,
and use an OHM meter to see if the element is burnt. The two types
of elements I checked were 3000 Watt at 18.7 Ohms, and 2500 Watt,
at 48 Ohms. If the elements are burnt out, you will get ZERO ohms.
If the element is burnt internally through the insulation in the tube,
and shorting to ground, between the ends and the steel back of the
stove ( ground) you will get a reading of X amount of ohms ( which
normally should be ZERO ) If the element is burnt or shorted to
ground, replace.

The F3 error is a really dumb mechanical errror of whether the 250 volts
is on the elements. It does not involve the computer or the thermostat,
or the relay " electronics" at all - it is just simply 3 contacts that supply
250 Volts, and whether or not the contacts work, the elements work,
or the fuses work. This the same 250 Volts that is on an ordinary
dial stove, and the dumbest part of the whole unit.

When I called service, they said they would order the $147.95 temperature
thermostat, and " see if this fixes the problem", if not they would start
replacing the modules - $300 and $400, plus labour, plus tax etc., and
since the problem was on the module, this would cost $147.95 + $300,
plus $75.00 for the first 15 minutes, and $15 for each additional 15 minutes,
for a total of about $466 dollars ( CDN ) which is about $460 dollars US.

A package of 25 fingernail files is $1.00 at the dollar store. That is all that
it cost to fix the problem. You need a square ( Robertson ) head screwdriver
to remove the 7 screws on the back panel, and then you wiggle the
covers off the relays, and clean them. It takes 10 minutes.

good luck ! Damned the manufacturers for not putting this information
in the user manual.

Robin Graves, January 2008, kidbots.com

Posted on Feb 01, 2008

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  • 190 Answers

SOURCE: Bosch oven not heating to temp

Dear customer,
i recommend u to try the following routine to sort out this problem

  • Check timer and clock settings
  • Reseat the element
  • Test the element
  • Test the element connectors
  • Test the oven temperature control
  • Test the oven selector control
  • Recalibrate the temperature control

  • hope u find this useful. thank you.

    Posted on Jul 09, 2008

    • 1170 Answers

    SOURCE: Fisher Paykel electric oven doesn't heat in Bake mode

    Electric Oven: Repairs and Maintenance Electricranges and ovens are generally easy to repair, because there's not muchto go wrong and there's not much you can do. Most repairs are actuallyreplacements, a matter of unplugging the old part and plugging in thenew. Most of the malfunctions that affect electric ranges involvefaulty heating elements.

    Caution: Beforedoing any work on an electric range or oven, make sure it's unplugged,or turn off the power to the unit by removing one or more fuses ortripping one or more breakers at the main entrance panel or at aseparate panel. If the range is fused at a separate panel, this panelmay be located adjacent to the main panel or in a basement, crawlspace, or other location. If there is a grounding wire to the range,disconnect it. Make sure the power to the unit is off.

    Servicing Fuses

    Ifthe range or oven is receiving power but doesn't work, the unit mayhave its own fuse or circuit breaker assembly. This assembly is usuallylocated under the cooktop of the range. In some units, lift the top ofthe range to gain access to the fuse assembly; or lift the elements,remove the drip pans, and look on the sides of the cabinets. Inside theoven, look to the back to spot the fuse assembly.


    Ifthe unit has this additional fuse or breaker system, components such asthe oven light, the range heating elements, the timer, and aself-cleaning feature may be separately fused.

    If thesecomponents or features fail to work, don't overlook the possibilitythat the fuses have blown. To replace a blown fuse, unscrew the oldfuse and install a new one of the same type and electrical rating. Ifthe unit has circuit breakers, push the breaker or reset button, whichis usually located on the control panel.

    Replacing Range Heating Elements

    Whena range heating element burns out, it's easy to replace. But before youdisassemble the range to check or replace an element, make sure therange is receiving power. Here's what you can do:

    Step 1:Check the power cord, the plug, and the outlet. Then look for blownfuses or tripped circuit breakers at the main entrance panel or at aseparate panel.

    Step 2:Check the fusing system inside the range. If the circuit is broken,restore it. If the range is receiving power, go on to check the element.

    Step 3:When the element is cool, remove it. In most ranges, each top heatingelement is connected to a terminal block in the side of the elementwell. To remove the terminal block, lift the element and remove themetal drip pan that rests below it. The element is held by tworetaining screws or is push-fit into the terminal block. To remove ascrew-type element, remove the screws holding the wires. To remove apush-type element, pull the element straight out of its connection.

    how-to-repair-an-oven-8.jpg
    ©2006 Publications International, Ltd.
    To remove a range heating element, remove the screws holding the terminal
    wires, or pull the element straight out of its connection.Step 4:Test the element with a volt-ohm-milliammeter (VOM) set to the RX1scale. Disconnect one of the electrical leads to the element and clipone probe of the VOM to each element terminal. If the element isfunctioning properly, the meter will read between 40 and 125 ohms; ifthe meter reads extremely high, the element is faulty and should bereplaced.

    To test a range element without using a VOM, remove aworking element from its terminal block and connect it to themalfunctioning element terminal. Don't let the test element overlap theedges of the element well; keep the element inside the well, even if itdoesn't fit perfectly. Turn on the power to the range. If the workingelement heats, the suspected element is bad and should be replaced. Ifthe working element doesn't heat, the terminal block wiring or theswitch that controls the element may be faulty. Call a professionalservice person.

    Step 5:Replace a burned-out range element with a new one made specifically forthe range. Take the old element to the appliance-parts store; ifpossible, take the make and model information, too. This data willprobably be on a metal tag attached to the back service panel of therange. To install the new element, connect it the same way the old onewas connected.

    Replacing Oven and Broiler Heating Elements

    Electric oven and broiler elements are often even easier to test and replace than range elements. Here's how:

    Step 1:If the oven element doesn't work, first check to see if the range isreceiving power. Don't overlook the fusing system inside the range.

    Step 2: If the range is receiving power, set the timer on the range to the MANUAL position.

    Step 3: If the element still doesn't heat, turn off the power to the range and test it with a VOM set to the RX1 scale.

    Step 4:Remove the screws or plugs that connect the element to the power.Remove the retaining shield, which is usually held by two screws, andremove the element from the brackets that hold it in the oven. Theelement is usually held in these brackets by screws.

    how-to-repair-an-oven-9.jpg
    ©2006 Publications International, Ltd.
    To remove an oven or broiler heating element, remove the screws or pull
    the plugs that connect it. Remove a retaining shield and lift out the element.

    Step 5:Clip the probes of the VOM to each element terminal. If the element isin working order, the meter will read from 15 to 30 ohms. If the meterreads higher than 30 ohms, the element is faulty and should bereplaced. If the element tests all right but doesn't work, the problemmay be at the terminals. Make sure the terminals are clean and tight atthe element connections.

    Oven and broiler elements cannot betested without a VOM. If you don't have a VOM, take the element to aprofessional service person for testing. The problem is usually amalfunctioning element; however, you aren't risking much by replacingthe element without a professional test.

    Step 6:Take the burned out element with you to the appliance-parts store tomake sure you get the right replacement part; if possible, take themake and model information, too.

    To install the new element,place it in the same position as the old one. Connect it the same waythe old one was connected, using the same screws to hold it in place.Just about all the other components of an electric range or oven(including its door gasket, oven controls, and timer) are virtually thesame as the components used on gas ranges.

    Most problems withgas and electric ovens or ranges are easier to fix than you think. Thekey is knowing how the various parts work and when to replace them.

    Have a look at these websites to find parts and details :

    http://www.appliancepartspros.com/appliance_range_oven.aspx
    http://www.gallawa.com/microtech/dataselect.html

    Posted on Mar 21, 2009

    • 1 Answer

    SOURCE: Jenn-Air electric wall oven door opens slightly when in bake mode

    See this thread:
    http://www.bobvila.com/BBS/Jenn_Air_Oven_door-Appliances-1-F3784.html

    This worked for me (or at least helped the repair guy get the right parts for my model). Had to replace both the hinges and the hinge brackets. Seems to be a defect in these Jenn-air ovens going back to about 2006. After the parts replacement, the door lines up better, but still does not feel like it really closes solidly. At least glass on the door lines up better with the glass on the control panel.

    Posted on Aug 09, 2009

    localwonder
    • 6784 Answers

    SOURCE: oven will not light. it is a frigidaire model #

    When the bake igniter becomes weak or burns out, your oven will not bake. The bake igniter is usually mounted on the oven burner. It's about 1 inch by 4-8 inches (depending on the model), and comes in round or flat styles. If you don't see the igniter glow at all, it's probably burned out. Replace the igniter if found defective. Note: one of the exceptions could be that your oven is set to automatic mode instead of manual. If this is the case, set your oven to manual mode and check again.

    If the bake igniter glows red and not bright yellow or white, it is probably because it is too weak. When this happens, the safety valve will not let the gas out into the oven burner. A weak igniter must be replaced.

    A faulty igniter is probably the most common cause, however there are others:

    1. Defective thermostat
    2. Defective selector switch
    3. Defective gas safety valve
    4. Defective gas valve coils

    Posted on Dec 17, 2009

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    My Jenn Air 1995 wall oven was working fine until one day the oven and the oven gas burner did not turn ON. I had electricty (make sure you did not trip a breaker) since my front panel LCD and clock was OK. I had a good gas supply.

    My oven is an "pilot-less" oven, it uses an electric igniter. Although the "ignitor" was "glowing red hot", the problem is that the gas valve depend on a certain amount of current. If you have a 120V house system, I think the valve needs 3.3 to 3.6 amps to turn on. The current flows through the igniter and then through the valve, as in a same path, like water. So you need an AMP meter to check proper current flow. I read 2.4 amps. I replaced the "glowing red hot" igniter with a new one, Vo"la it was fixed.

    Bottom line if you have the oven plugged in OK and you see some life (clock), and you have the gas turned on, most likely the igniter is bad. Second choice would be the oven's thermostat (the temp knob that you turn, say to 350F), or it could be the gas valve.

    All three are in same current circuit. The igniter gets the most abuse so I would start there first -good luck!

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    FOR THE JGW8130DDB WITH NO POWER ANYWHERE, IT SOUNDS LIKE YOU HAVE A SUPPLY PROBLEM. MAKE SURE THE WIRING IS HOOKED UP WITH THE RED AND WHITE WIRES RECEIVING 240 VOLTS AND THE WHITE WIRE ATTACHED TO NEUTRAL / GROUND.IF THE OVEN HAS A BARE COPPER WIRE AND THE HOUSEHOLD WIRING ONLY HAS THREE WIRES, COMBINE THE WHITE WIRE AND THE COPPER WIRE TOGETHER AND ATTACH TO THE HOUSEHOLD NEUTRAL / GROUND .
    UNLESS YOU ARE SURE ABOUT THE HOOKUP IN THE BREAKER/FUSE BOX, DO NOT GO SIMPLY BY THE COLOR OF THE WIRES.

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