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Furnace doesn't reach desired temperature

Filters changed often. Installed new thermostat. Does condensate on a 90% unit affect this?

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  • Celialuna77 Jan 16, 2009

    My home is only 2 1/2 years old and it's a 2 story home w/ unfinished bsmt. Every winter, when it gets super cold outside, the furnace can't seem to keep up w/ the desired temp.

    Could it be that the furnace is not equipped to handle keeping the whole house warm (being that there is only 1 furnace controlling the whole house)?....or could it be that they just didn't install it right?

    Please advice.....thank you.

  • Stephen Evans May 11, 2010

    If the condensate is pumped to the outside instead of to a laundry tub or such, there is a chance it can freeze outside. This can cause the furnace to shut down if the pump is wired into the furnace with the float safety if equipped. Does this drain to the outside?

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Yes....... it can freeze if drained outside........ It is always best to discharge the condensate to an inside drain.
The other persons problem could be a undersized furnace for the home. Or Yes it coukld be a faulty installation. Always make sure a permit is purchesed from your towns building inspector. This way you can be reassured that the it is done properly and sized properly.

Posted on Apr 03, 2009

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