Question about ViewSonic VP191b 19" LCD Monitor

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Running pixelation On areas of a specific tonal/grey value I see running pixellation that appears red in color. For example, on the Window title bar it will appear in bands. In images it will appear throughout the image where the grey value is equal. It happened during my warranty but the shop, which had it for a week, insisted there was no problem. Now the warranty has expired and the problem has come back. I have tested it with my laptop and the problem is identical so I doubt it is the video card. I have tried powering off the monitor and, while that seemed to work earlier, it has no effect now.

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  • Grant Bowen Apr 05, 2007

    I did try the monitor on another PC as I said in my original post and the problem is still there. And the cable is hard wired so I cannot swap.
    All cables and pins seem fine. Plus, the intermittant nature of the problem seems, top me, to rule out the cable, which is never disturbed.

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It?s possible the shop may have been right. From your description it sounds similar to problems I?ve had on a few computers in the past; in fact I have one I need to test on Monday morning as well. For me this has usually been a video card/driver problem, I suggest you connect this monitor to another PC. Some LCD monitors have a video cable that is removable. If yours does make sure you use another cable you know works and not the one from your PC. If the problem follows the monitor then I would take it back ask for the manager and try to nicely convince him/her that this repair should be under the warranty since you had brought this to their attention while it was in effect. If the problem doesn?t follow the monitor then the next thing to try is connecting another monitor to your PC to see if the problem reappears. If you can?t do this then the only other option is to assume the problem is your computer hardware or software. - Remove the video cable where it plugs into the PC and check it for bent pins, corrosion; replace and firmly reconnect using the thumbscrews on the connector. - Some LCD monitors have removable cables some don?t; if yours does follow the same procedure outlined above. - If your monitor has a removable video cable try switching it with another one you know works. - Find, download and install the latest driver for your video card, restart and test. - If your video card is not built into your motherboard then remove and reseat the card in its slot and test. - Try another video card in your PC. Tell us the results and please let us know if you have any other questions; thanks in advance for rating this posting.

Posted on Apr 01, 2007

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Where can I get a readable user manual?


Digital Cameras beginner guide
Digital Cameras - A beginner's guide by Bob Atkins, 2003

Digital Camera Basics - A primer Digital cameras are confusing to a lot of new users. In this basic guide to digital camera technology we hope to try to give digital beginners at least some basis to use in deciding which digital camera is appropriate for them. When shopping for a digital camera it's at least good to know what the basic terms like white balance, pixel, ppi and dpi mean and how they affect image and print quality. It's also important to know the difference between things like optical zoom and digital zoom as well as the advantages and disadvantages between storage formats such as Compact Flash (CF), Microdrives, Sony Memory Stick, Secure Digital (SD), Multimedia and camera interface technologies such as USB 1.1, USB 2.0 and Firewire IEEE 1394.
Pixels A pixel is a contraction if the term PIcture ELement. Digital images are made up of small squares, just like a tile mosaic on your kitchen or bathroom wall. Though a digital photograph looks smooth and continuous just like a regular photograph, it's actually composed of millions of tiny squares as shown below.

Each pixel in the image has a numerical value of between 0 and 255 and is made up of three color channels. So for example a pixel could be 37-red, 76-green and 125-blue and it would then look like this . If it was 162-red, 27-green and 12-blue, it would look like this . There are over 16 million possible combinations using this scheme and each one represents a different color. Computer savvy readers will note that each color in this scheme can be represented by an 8-bit number (byte), so the color of each pixel is defined by three color bytes. This scheme can be expanded, for example to use 16-bits (two 8-bit bytes) for each color. images using three 8-bit values are sometimes called 24-bit color images. images using three 12-bit values for color definition are called 36-bit color images, and those using three 16-bit values are called 48-bit color images.

Pixel Count One of the main ways that manufacturers categorize their digital cameras is in terms of pixel count. What this is is the number of individual pixels that go into making each image. Today this number varies between 1 million (1 Megapixel) to around 14 million (14 Megapixels). A million pixels is abbreviated to MP, so a 1MP camera has 1 million pixels and a 3MP camera has 3 million pixels. Currently most popular consumer digital cameras have between 2MP and 5MP. A 3MP camera can make excellent 4"x6" prints and very good 5"x7" prints. If you intend to make lots of 8"x10" prints, then perhaps a 4MP or 5MP camera would be a better choice. Sometimes two numbers are given, total pixels and effective pixels. Total pixels count every pixel on the sensor surface. Usually the very edge pixels aren't used in the final image. Effective pixels are the number of pixels actually used in the image after the edge pixels have been dropped.

Aspect Ratio The aspect ratio of a camera is the ratio of the length of the sides of the images. For example, a traditional 35mm film frame is approximately 36mm wide and 24mm HIGH. This has an aspect ratio of 36:24, which can equally well be expressed as 3:2. Some digicams use the same aspect ratio for their digital images. For example most digital SLR (single lens reflex) cameras have a 3:2 aspect ratio. However, video monitors typically use a 4:3 aspect ratio. For example a monitor with a 800x600 display has a 4:3 aspect ratio. With this in mind, most consumer level digicams use a 4:3 aspect ratio for their images.
Sensor Size The size of the digital sensor element (which is equivalent to the size of the negative for film cameras) is pretty small in all consumer digicams - typically around the size of a fingernail (and a small fingernail at that!). As I said above, a 35mm film frame is 24mm high by 36mm wide but most digital cameras use sensors very much smaller than this. Here are some typical digicam sensor sizes. The "name" of the sensor is based on specification for old TV tubes used in the 1950s. Nobody is quite sure why it's being used for modern digital sensors since the "sizes" don't really relate in any consistent way to the actual physical size of the sensor. However these names are widely used, so it's best to know what they are. They are often listed in digital camera spec sheets.

for more info click on link above.

Jun 23, 2015 | Cameras

Tip

How to fix a dead or stuck pixel on an LCD screen


A dead or stuck pixel on an LCD screen or TFT can be incredibly annoying. You'll be staring at it for days on end, wondering for how long you'll be without your screen or maybe your entire laptop if you decided to turn it in for repair or replacement. All that grieve over something as unimportant, yet highly irritating as a malfunctioning pixel.<br /> Before you run the item back to the store though, you should try to see whether you can fix it yourself! This, if done carefully, will not hamper your warranty and might save you a lot of time and worries. So let's see what you can do yourself.<br /> Let me say that any new LCD or TFT monitor should be tested for pixel errors. This can be done simply by running it through a palette of basic colors and black and white in full screen mode. The software, which we'll get to in a second, can do that.<br /> First let me explain what you may be seeing. Is it just a stuck pixel or is it in fact dead? A stuck pixel will appear in any of the colors that its three subpixels (red, green and blue) can form, depending on their functionality and brightness. In a dead pixel all subpixels are permanently off, which will make the pixel appear black. This may result from a broken transistor, in rare cases however even a black pixel may just be stuck. So if you're seeing a colored or white pixel, your chances are pretty good and if it's black, there is still hope.<br /> Let's turn to the software now. If you're not on Windows, scroll down for some online tools!<br /> <b><a href="http://udpix.free.fr/">UDPixel</a> (Windows)</b> I recommend UDPixel to quickly identify and fix pixels using a single tool. The program requires .NET Framework 2.<br /> <p><img src="fixpixel02.png" /> With the dead pixel locator on the left you can easily detect any screen irregularity that may have escaped your vision until now. Should you have identified a suspicious pixel, switch to the undead pixel option, create sufficient amounts of flash windows (one per stuck pixel) and hit start. You can drag the tiny flashing windows to where you found the pixel in question. Let it run for a while and eventually change the flash interval.<br /> <b><a href="http://flexcode.org/lcd.html">LCD</a> (online)</b> This is one tool that lets you find and eventually fix stuck pixels. It packs many options into a singly tiny window, but once you have an overview it's straightforward and easy to use.<br /> <p><img src="fixpixel06.png" /> To test the screen click the small 'pick a color' box. The colors you should test are red, green and blue. Additionally you should test white and black. Follow the instructions in the box to gain the best results.<br /> <b><a href="http://tft.vanity.dk/">Online Monitor Test</a> (Online)</b> This is a very thorough test not only meant to identify bad pixels, but also powerful enough to test the quality of your monitor. You can choose between three different modes to test your monitor. This tool either requires flash (online version) or it can be installed in the executable mode.<br /> <p><img src="fixpixel03.png" /> What you will need to just test for stuck pixels is the HTML window. Toggle full screen by hitting F11. What you will see is displayed below.<br /> <p><img src="fixpixel04.png" /> Move the mouse to the top of the test window and a menu will appear. There is an info window that you can turn off with a button in the top right of the menu. Then click on the homogenity test point and move through the three colors as well as black and white. Fingers crossed you won't discover anything out of the ordinary. In the unfortunate case that you do, you may find the following online tool helpful.<br /> <b><a href="http://www.jscreenfix.com/basic.php">JScreenFix</a> (Online)</b> Alternatively, and if you're not using Windows XP, you can use the online tool JScreenFix which launches a Java applet to fix stuck pixel.<br /> <p><img src="fixpixel05.png" /> The tool launches a small applet in a separate browser window and you can drag the window to the respective spot or run it in full screen.<br /> Hands On (Offline) Should none of these tools resolve your pixel issue, there is one last chance. You can combine any of the tools and the magic power of your own hands. There is a very good description of all available techniques on <a href="http://www.wikihow.com/Fix-a-Stuck-Pixel-on-an-LCD-Monitor">wikiHow</a>. Another great step by step guide can be found on <a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/Fix-a-stuck-pixel-on-an-LCD-monitor/">instructables</a>.<br /> But let's go through one technique real quick:<br /> <ol> <li>Turn off your monitor.</li> <li>Get yourself a damp cloth, so that you won't scratch the screen.</li> <li>Apply pressure to the area where the stuck pixel is. Try not to put pressure anywhere else, as this may trigger the creation of more stuck pixels.</li> <li>While applying pressure, turn on your computer and screen.</li> <li>Remove pressure and the stuck pixel should be gone.</li></ol> This works because in a stuck pixel liquid in a subpixel has not spread equally. In combination with the backlight of your screen, this liquid is used to allow different amounts of light to pass through, which creates the different colors.<br /> Should all of these approaches fail to fix your pixel warrior, at least you'll now know it's not simple to fix and the LCD may indeed need to be replaced. But please do let us know if these tips helped you to fix your pixels. In any case, good luck!

on Jan 04, 2011 | Sony KDF-E55A20 55 in. LCD Television

Tip

"Aero features are'nt running in window's 7"


Solution: Check that your computer meets the minimum hardware requirements for running Aero:



1-gigahertz (GHz) 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor


1 gigabyte (GB) of random access memory (RAM)


128-megabyte (MB) graphics card


Aero also requires a DirectX 9 class graphics processor that supports a Windows Display Driver Model Driver, Pixel Shader 2.0 in hardware, and 32 bits per pixel.

For best results, you might also want to follow these graphics processor recommendations:



64 MB of graphics memory to support a single monitor with a resolution that is less than 1,310,720 pixels (for example, a 17–inch flat panel LCD monitor that has a 1280 × 1024 resolution)


128 MB of graphics memory to support a single monitor with a resolution from 1,310,720 to 2,304,000 pixels (for example, a 21.1–inch flat panel LCD monitor that has up to a 1600 × 1200 resolution)


256 MB of graphics memory to support a single monitor with a resolution greater than 2,304,000 pixels (for example, a 30–inch wide-screen flat panel LCD monitor that has up to a 2560 × 1600 resolution)


To turn on window frame transparency, the color scheme must first be set to Windows Aero.

1.Open Personalization by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, clicking Control Panel, clicking Appearance and Personalization, and then clicking Personalization.


2.Click Window Color and Appearance.


3.Select the Enable transparency check box.

To change the color scheme to Windows Aero

1.Open Appearance Settings by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, clicking Control Panel, clicking Appearance and Personalization, clicking Personalization, and then clicking Window Color and Appearance. If the Appearance Settings dialog box is not displayed, at the bottom of the page, click Open classic appearance properties.


2.In the Color scheme list, click Windows Aero, and then click OK.

Check that your theme is an aero theme and not a normal theme. Themes are available in normal and aero and can be confusing. Set your theme as an aero theme and you should get the aero window working.

These steps will help us to have AERO running.

Thank's and Regard's:
Pcs365.8


on Jul 13, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Recently I found one balck spot on my picture, I dont know whay the black spot is coming. I am having a Nikkon D90 18-105 lens.


The black spot can be from one or two sources. The first, is a called a stuck or hot pixel. Your camera's sensor has 12.9 million pixels (12.3 million are used for the image). Many times, a hot or stuck pixel is a bright color - red, yellow, green, etc. It can be any color however. Dark or black pixels can also be called dead pixels as they look like they're "off." Regardless of which your camera suffers, it will not respond to light projected on the sensor by the lens. You'll have to have manually edit the pixel in each image, or return to Nikon for sensor replacement. Nikon used to perform a mapping out of the pixel, but it seems that they don't do this any longer. A sensor replacement can cost in the hundreds of dollars.

The second source, is dust on the sensor. A pixel(s) blocked by dust will show up in each picture, but will appear to be more in focus in some images than others - depending on the aperture value of the camera when the exposure was made. A stuck pixel usually has a very definite edge on all images regardless of aperture setting. A simple, careful wet cleaning of the sensor with a product designed specifically for the job can solve this problem pretty quickly.

Here's a video for wet sensor cleaning from Youtube There are others here too. I hope this was helpful & good luck!

Jun 06, 2011 | Nikon D90 Digital Camera with 18-105mm...

1 Answer

What does it mean by dead cells?


I assume this is related to your LCD monitor.
I think you mean dead pixels. The LCD monitor has tiny pixel elements, one for each red, blue, green color and each one of these colored pixels are turnes on by a transistor. When a transistor fails then the colored pixel it controls does not light up. This is a dead pixel and it shows up as a tiny black dot.
If the screen displays a blue screen, a dead blue pixel will appear as a tiny black dot in the blue screen.
You normally would not notice a few dead pixels unless they are grouped together.

Sep 20, 2010 | Hanns.G Corporation HW191D 19" LCD Monitor

1 Answer

A gree speck on the screen


It's an "open" pixel. It is unable to close to block the light, so it appears as a dot. The color white is made up of red, green and blue. So, a single open pixel will have just a single color. If you have had the TV for just a short time (< 30 days), many retailers will exchange the TV. However, if you have had the TV longer, you should contact the manufacture. The pixel specifications will vary from manufacture to manufacture... but some manufactures have a zero dead pixel specification and they will repair the TV at no cost to you. I hope this was helpful, best wishes.

Apr 17, 2010 | LG 42LC2D 42 in. LCD HDTV

1 Answer

Toshiba satellite m35x s149 displays red pixels for black pixels


if you have a warranty - have the manufacturer replace the lcd display unit.

Sep 26, 2008 | Toshiba Satellite 2250XCDS Notebook

1 Answer

Sharp Actius AL27 pixel problems


From what you described, it seems as though your LCD panel is going bad or the inverter board is bad. Does it change colors if you were to reposition (tilt) the LCD back and forth in either direction?

Nov 30, 2007 | Sharp Actius AL27 Notebook

1 Answer

Pixel color fade


You are about reade to have a scan ic failure.Try to get it to a repair center asap.Have them replace the top 2 scan ic's

Jan 28, 2007 | Pioneer PureVision PDP-5030HD 50 in....

1 Answer

Ultrazoom pixellation problems


No, it isn't to do with white balance. Instead it is due to a combination of noise swamping (or at least modifying significantly) the exposure measured by the pixel, and the interpolation algorithm in the sensor processing chips that "guesses" the colour of a pixel based on the readings from nearby pixels. These algorithms are better at rendering certain kinds of image elements than others. Large areas of darkish colour often fool the algorithms into attempting to produce detail that doesn't exist.

Sep 13, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-740 Ultra Zoom Digital...

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