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How do i check oil level? - Air Conditioners

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Go to your oil tank. If you have a basement it is probably down there otherwise its outside. on the top of the tank there will be a vertical plastic gauge with a line inside. The lower the line is, the less amount of oil you have. Just dont let it run out. Steve

Posted on Dec 21, 2008

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My suv was parked for several month~s and today i try to move it and on the dush it say low oil pressure


Check your oil level to see if it is not low. If it is OK then you might have a blockage from crude in the oil system. Do you change your oil at normal service intervals?

Mar 12, 2015 | GMC 2005 Envoy XL Denali

1 Answer

My soleus air cond, dehumidifier 8.000 btu.


it takes a line tap valve to add refrigerant.

Jul 05, 2014 | Soleus KY-25U Air Conditioner

1 Answer

Leaking air conditioner, possible crack in drainage hole??


System Inspection
Although the A/C system should not be serviced by the do-it-yourselfer, preventive maintenance can be practiced and A/C system inspections can be performed to help maintain the efficiency of the vehicle's A/C system. For A/C system inspection, perform the following: The easiest and often most important check for the air conditioning system consists of a visual inspection of the system components. Visually inspect the air conditioning system for refrigerant leaks, damaged compressor clutch, abnormal compressor drive belt tension and/or condition, plugged evaporator drain tube, blocked condenser fins, disconnected or broken wires, blown fuses, corroded connections and poor insulation.
CHECKING FOR OIL LEAKS Refrigerant leaks show up as oily areas on the various components because the compressor oil is transported around the entire system along with the refrigerant. Look for oily spots on all the hoses and lines, and especially on the hose and tubing connections. If there are oily deposits, the system may have a leak, and you should have it checked by a certified air conditioning specialist.
Fig. 1: Run your hand along the underside of all hose connections and check for leaks. If you find a leak, have it fixed by a certified air conditioning specialist.
check%20ac%20leak.jpg KEEPING THE CONDENSER CLEAR Periodically inspect the front of the condenser for bent fins or foreign material (dirt, bugs, leaves, etc.). If any cooling fins are bent, straighten them carefully. You can remove any debris with a stiff bristle brush.

Fig. 1: The position of the condenser in front of the radiator makes it particularly susceptible to collecting debris. Periodically, remove the accumulated bugs, leaves and other trash from the condenser. ac%202.gif
CHECKING THE REFRIGERANT LEVEL There are two ways to check refrigerant level. On vehicles equipped with sight glasses, checking the refrigerant level is a simple matter. Many late model vehicles, however, do not have a sight glass, and you have to check the temperature of the lines to determine the refrigerant level.
With Sight Glass The sight glass is normally located in the head of the receiver/drier. The receiver/drier is not hard to locate. It's a large metal cylinder that looks something like a fire extinguisher. Sometimes the sight glass is located in one of the metal lines leading from the top of the receiver/drier. Once you've found it, wipe it clean and proceed as follows:
  1. With the engine and the air conditioning system running, look for the flow of refrigerant through the sight glass. If the air conditioner is working properly, you'll be able to see a continuous flow of clear refrigerant through the sight glass, with perhaps an occasional bubble at very high temperatures.
  2. Cycle the air conditioner on and off to make sure what you are seeing is clear refrigerant. Since the refrigerant is clear, it is possible to mistake a completely discharged system for one that is fully charged. Turn the system off and watch the sight glass. If there is refrigerant in the system, you'll see bubbles during the off cycle. If you observe no bubbles when the system is running, and the airflow from the unit in the vehicle is delivering cold air, everything is OK.
  3. If you observe bubbles in the sight glass while the system is operating, the system is low on refrigerant. Have it checked by a professional.
  4. Oil streaks in the sight glass are an indication of trouble. Most of the time, if you see oil in the sight glass, it will appear as a series of streaks, although occasionally it may be a solid stream of oil. In either case, it means that part of the charge has been lost.
  1. Fig. 1: Oils streaks (A), constant bubbles (B) or foam (C) indicate there is not enough refrigerant in the system. Occasional bubbles during the initial operation are normal. A clear sight glass indicates a proper charge of refrigerant or no refrigerant at all, which can be determined by the presence of cold air at the outlets in the vehicle. If the glass is clouded with a milky white substance, have the receiver/dryer checked by a certified air conditioning specialist. ac%203.jpg

Without Sight Glass On vehicles that are not equipped with sight glasses, it is necessary to feel the temperature difference in the inlet and outlet lines at the receiver/drier to gauge the refrigerant level. Use the following procedure:
  1. Locate the receiver/drier. It will generally be up front near the condenser. It is shaped like a small fire extinguisher and will always have two lines connected to it. One line goes to the expansion valve and the other goes to the condenser.
  2. With the engine and the air conditioner running, hold a line in each hand and gauge their relative temperatures. If they are the same approximate temperatures, the system is correctly charged.
  3. If the line from the expansion valve to the receiver/drier is a lot colder than the line from the receiver/drier to the condenser, then the system is overcharged. It should be noted that this is an extremely rare condition.
  4. If the line that leads from the receiver/drier to the condenser is a lot colder than the other line, the system is undercharged.
  5. If the system is undercharged or overcharged, have it checked by a professional air conditioning mechanic.
Fig. 3: Checking the refrigerant charge if the system has no sight glass. ac%204.jpg

May 24, 2011 | Sharp CV10NH Air Conditioner

1 Answer

Air conditioner turns on but fan is locked up


System Inspection
Although the A/C system should not be serviced by the do-it-yourselfer, preventive maintenance can be practiced and A/C system inspections can be performed to help maintain the efficiency of the vehicle's A/C system. For A/C system inspection, perform the following: The easiest and often most important check for the air conditioning system consists of a visual inspection of the system components. Visually inspect the air conditioning system for refrigerant leaks, damaged compressor clutch, abnormal compressor drive belt tension and/or condition, plugged evaporator drain tube, blocked condenser fins, disconnected or broken wires, blown fuses, corroded connections and poor insulation.
CHECKING FOR OIL LEAKS Refrigerant leaks show up as oily areas on the various components because the compressor oil is transported around the entire system along with the refrigerant. Look for oily spots on all the hoses and lines, and especially on the hose and tubing connections. If there are oily deposits, the system may have a leak, and you should have it checked by a certified air conditioning specialist.
Fig. 1: Run your hand along the underside of all hose connections and check for leaks. If you find a leak, have it fixed by a certified air conditioning specialist.
check%20ac%20leak.jpg KEEPING THE CONDENSER CLEAR Periodically inspect the front of the condenser for bent fins or foreign material (dirt, bugs, leaves, etc.). If any cooling fins are bent, straighten them carefully. You can remove any debris with a stiff bristle brush.

Fig. 1: The position of the condenser in front of the radiator makes it particularly susceptible to collecting debris. Periodically, remove the accumulated bugs, leaves and other trash from the condenser. ac%202.gif
CHECKING THE REFRIGERANT LEVEL There are two ways to check refrigerant level. On vehicles equipped with sight glasses, checking the refrigerant level is a simple matter. Many late model vehicles, however, do not have a sight glass, and you have to check the temperature of the lines to determine the refrigerant level.
With Sight Glass The sight glass is normally located in the head of the receiver/drier. The receiver/drier is not hard to locate. It's a large metal cylinder that looks something like a fire extinguisher. Sometimes the sight glass is located in one of the metal lines leading from the top of the receiver/drier. Once you've found it, wipe it clean and proceed as follows:
  1. With the engine and the air conditioning system running, look for the flow of refrigerant through the sight glass. If the air conditioner is working properly, you'll be able to see a continuous flow of clear refrigerant through the sight glass, with perhaps an occasional bubble at very high temperatures.
  2. Cycle the air conditioner on and off to make sure what you are seeing is clear refrigerant. Since the refrigerant is clear, it is possible to mistake a completely discharged system for one that is fully charged. Turn the system off and watch the sight glass. If there is refrigerant in the system, you'll see bubbles during the off cycle. If you observe no bubbles when the system is running, and the airflow from the unit in the vehicle is delivering cold air, everything is OK.
  3. If you observe bubbles in the sight glass while the system is operating, the system is low on refrigerant. Have it checked by a professional.
  4. Oil streaks in the sight glass are an indication of trouble. Most of the time, if you see oil in the sight glass, it will appear as a series of streaks, although occasionally it may be a solid stream of oil. In either case, it means that part of the charge has been lost.
  1. Fig. 1: Oils streaks (A), constant bubbles (B) or foam (C) indicate there is not enough refrigerant in the system. Occasional bubbles during the initial operation are normal. A clear sight glass indicates a proper charge of refrigerant or no refrigerant at all, which can be determined by the presence of cold air at the outlets in the vehicle. If the glass is clouded with a milky white substance, have the receiver/dryer checked by a certified air conditioning specialist. ac%203.jpg

Without Sight Glass On vehicles that are not equipped with sight glasses, it is necessary to feel the temperature difference in the inlet and outlet lines at the receiver/drier to gauge the refrigerant level. Use the following procedure:
  1. Locate the receiver/drier. It will generally be up front near the condenser. It is shaped like a small fire extinguisher and will always have two lines connected to it. One line goes to the expansion valve and the other goes to the condenser.
  2. With the engine and the air conditioner running, hold a line in each hand and gauge their relative temperatures. If they are the same approximate temperatures, the system is correctly charged.
  3. If the line from the expansion valve to the receiver/drier is a lot colder than the line from the receiver/drier to the condenser, then the system is overcharged. It should be noted that this is an extremely rare condition.
  4. If the line that leads from the receiver/drier to the condenser is a lot colder than the other line, the system is undercharged.
  5. If the system is undercharged or overcharged, have it checked by a professional air conditioning mechanic.
Fig. 3: Checking the refrigerant charge if the system has no sight glass. ac%204.jpg

Feb 21, 2011 | Carrier 52CE-309 Cool Electric Heat Air...

1 Answer

What kind of oil is needed before repalcng the freon in this unit?


Ok. But first a little explanation.
The reason there is water in an air conditioner is because it both cools and dehumidifies the air. With that being said the air conditioner should be mounted and checked with a level. The unit should have a doward tilt showing 1/4 bubble.
There is a ring around the fan blade on the condenser side known as a slinger ring. The purpose is to pick up some of the conensate water and "Sling" against the condenser to help remove the heat making it more efficient.
Very rarely do you looses that much oil when putting a hole in the condenser. But if he wants to add oil 4G is for air conditioning, however the compressor will have to be removed and the oil poured out into a container so as to be measured.
Go to Techumseh Compressor web site and download their service manual as it shows other ways to do this as well as wiring diagrams, oil levels and other useful information.

Feb 15, 2011 | Frigidaire FAC127S1A Air Conditioner

1 Answer

Air conditioner leaking water from the unit inside


System Inspection
Although the A/C system should not be serviced by the do-it-yourselfer, preventive maintenance can be practiced and A/C system inspections can be performed to help maintain the efficiency of the vehicle's A/C system. For A/C system inspection, perform the following: The easiest and often most important check for the air conditioning system consists of a visual inspection of the system components. Visually inspect the air conditioning system for refrigerant leaks, damaged compressor clutch, abnormal compressor drive belt tension and/or condition, plugged evaporator drain tube, blocked condenser fins, disconnected or broken wires, blown fuses, corroded connections and poor insulation.
CHECKING FOR OIL LEAKS Refrigerant leaks show up as oily areas on the various components because the compressor oil is transported around the entire system along with the refrigerant. Look for oily spots on all the hoses and lines, and especially on the hose and tubing connections. If there are oily deposits, the system may have a leak, and you should have it checked by a certified air conditioning specialist.
Fig. 1: Run your hand along the underside of all hose connections and check for leaks. If you find a leak, have it fixed by a certified air conditioning specialist.
check%20ac%20leak.jpg KEEPING THE CONDENSER CLEAR Periodically inspect the front of the condenser for bent fins or foreign material (dirt, bugs, leaves, etc.). If any cooling fins are bent, straighten them carefully. You can remove any debris with a stiff bristle brush.

Fig. 1: The position of the condenser in front of the radiator makes it particularly susceptible to collecting debris. Periodically, remove the accumulated bugs, leaves and other trash from the condenser. ac%202.gif
CHECKING THE REFRIGERANT LEVEL There are two ways to check refrigerant level. On vehicles equipped with sight glasses, checking the refrigerant level is a simple matter. Many late model vehicles, however, do not have a sight glass, and you have to check the temperature of the lines to determine the refrigerant level.
With Sight Glass The sight glass is normally located in the head of the receiver/drier. The receiver/drier is not hard to locate. It's a large metal cylinder that looks something like a fire extinguisher. Sometimes the sight glass is located in one of the metal lines leading from the top of the receiver/drier. Once you've found it, wipe it clean and proceed as follows:
  1. With the engine and the air conditioning system running, look for the flow of refrigerant through the sight glass. If the air conditioner is working properly, you'll be able to see a continuous flow of clear refrigerant through the sight glass, with perhaps an occasional bubble at very high temperatures.
  2. Cycle the air conditioner on and off to make sure what you are seeing is clear refrigerant. Since the refrigerant is clear, it is possible to mistake a completely discharged system for one that is fully charged. Turn the system off and watch the sight glass. If there is refrigerant in the system, you'll see bubbles during the off cycle. If you observe no bubbles when the system is running, and the airflow from the unit in the vehicle is delivering cold air, everything is OK.
  3. If you observe bubbles in the sight glass while the system is operating, the system is low on refrigerant. Have it checked by a professional.
  4. Oil streaks in the sight glass are an indication of trouble. Most of the time, if you see oil in the sight glass, it will appear as a series of streaks, although occasionally it may be a solid stream of oil. In either case, it means that part of the charge has been lost.
  1. Fig. 1: Oils streaks (A), constant bubbles (B) or foam (C) indicate there is not enough refrigerant in the system. Occasional bubbles during the initial operation are normal. A clear sight glass indicates a proper charge of refrigerant or no refrigerant at all, which can be determined by the presence of cold air at the outlets in the vehicle. If the glass is clouded with a milky white substance, have the receiver/dryer checked by a certified air conditioning specialist. ac%203.jpg

Without Sight Glass On vehicles that are not equipped with sight glasses, it is necessary to feel the temperature difference in the inlet and outlet lines at the receiver/drier to gauge the refrigerant level. Use the following procedure:
  1. Locate the receiver/drier. It will generally be up front near the condenser. It is shaped like a small fire extinguisher and will always have two lines connected to it. One line goes to the expansion valve and the other goes to the condenser.
  2. With the engine and the air conditioner running, hold a line in each hand and gauge their relative temperatures. If they are the same approximate temperatures, the system is correctly charged.
  3. If the line from the expansion valve to the receiver/drier is a lot colder than the line from the receiver/drier to the condenser, then the system is overcharged. It should be noted that this is an extremely rare condition.
  4. If the line that leads from the receiver/drier to the condenser is a lot colder than the other line, the system is undercharged.
  5. If the system is undercharged or overcharged, have it checked by a professional air conditioning mechanic.
Fig. 3: Checking the refrigerant charge if the system has no sight glass. ac%204.jpg

Nov 14, 2010 | Whirlwind FH-778 Air Conditioner

1 Answer

Fan motor has loud screech.


Check for oil ports on motor. Usually red or yelloe plug in caps. No more than 20 drops of oil. I usually use sewing machine oil.

Apr 26, 2009 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

Fuel oil level extremely low: possible problems?


After your fuel tank is refilled let it set if possible for solids to settle. In the line near the tank is a fuel filter. This fuel filter should be changed regularly, normally annually. The air must be vented from the fuel filter though vent screws located on top of fuel filter. Do not remove the screws completely as air will vent as they are loosened. At the burner oil pump is a vent to which you can slip on a 1/4 inch hose and direct into a container. On burner start up loosen the vent at the oil pump and observe oil going into container. When solid stream of oil is seen close the vent. The vent looks like a grease fitting on an auto.

follow these instructions: One problem that can occur is the nozzle for the burner sometimes becomes plugged if solid particles make their way to it under low oil conditions. If this becomes the case you should have a heating service tech change the nozzle and fuel filter. However try the venting procedure first. You just may be O.K.

Dec 15, 2008 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

Domestic oil fired central heating. Keeps tripping out with no oil feed(has tiger loop and this is empty) If oil is drawn through filling tiger loop again boiler will fire up and run for betweeen 2 days...


many times the feeder tube from the bottom of the tank becomes perforated. the return tube is ok most of the time . try switching the 3 8 tubes from inlet to outlet and see if problem resolved. if so the the tube down into the tank is flawed.

Oct 31, 2008 | Air Conditioners

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