Question about Canon PIXMA iP4000 InkJet Photo Printer

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Vertical dark lines

My printer is creating vertical dark lines over all the picture.

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  • Anonymous Jan 03, 2009

    Mine too.  The blue ink comes out in parallel stripes of light and dark.  Changing the cartridge, running print head alignment and cleaning didn't help.

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  • 141 Answers

Try to reset the printer unplug it for an hour.

If those line are drawn (nice and straight) the printer has serious issues, think of replacement.

If you change recently your black for a compatible then try a genuine one,

The print head might have leaked.
Or, a drop of ink felt on the wheel who move the paper. Open it and try to clean with a damp rug
The mechanism need some greassy spot so do not be too clean.
good luck...

Posted on Dec 19, 2008

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