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Olympus 0M10 ..delayed shutter speed?

When using our 0M10 camera, the shutter remains open for about 4 seconds, making photos blurred.

Does anybody know what's wrong?

Thanks

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Be sure the mode knob at the top beside the wind lever, is set to Auto ( not B or Manual Adapter ). Then be sure your lens aperture is set to a lower number like 2 or 4. If this doesn't change things, it probably needs repair.

Posted on Dec 17, 2008

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Action photos blurred using the zoom lens.


When shooting pictures, always check the length of the lens. Take the length in mm to decide how fast your shutter speed should be. When shooting 200 mm, the shutter speed should be at least 1/200 of a second. For a 400 mm it should be 1/400 of a second, and so on. With indoors sport, you need a lens with a huge aperture like 2,8 or better and a high ISO setting, to reach the speed needed for a long lens.
Modern lenses can have vibration reduction, and with these sometimes you can shoot 3 to 4 full stops sower.
A 200 mm lens with vibration reduction can be used then at 1/25 or even 1/15 of a second and still don't need to worry about motion blur.

Mar 07, 2015 | Cameras

1 Answer

Aperture remains fully open, cannot adjust


If its just how to change the settings on your camera then your manual will tell you how. If you mean how changing these settings effects the final outcome of your photograph then I can recommend Langfords Starting Photography book which will explain all you need to know regarding these.
Its best to keep your ISO as low as possible in order to avoid noise in your images, however night shoots need a higher ISO but a tripod is recommended to avoid picture shake.
Shutter speed determines how long the camera shutter stays open letting let in. Shutter speed is often shown as 1/125 or 1/15 for example and what this actually means is that the shutter will stay open to let light in for either 125th or 15th of a second. By changing how shutter speed is set alters the final outcome of your image. Let's say you wanted to take a photo of a waterfall and you wanted to freeze the action so that you could see the waters movement clearly, then you would use a fast shutter speed such as 1/500 or higher. However, instead if you wanted the water to look blurred then you would use a slow shutter speed such as 1/15 or lower.
Aperture which is also known as f numbers are often shown as F2.8 or F8 for example, and these can affect depth of field. Depth of field determines just how much or how little of your final image remains in focus. By choosing a high f number like F8 or higher means that the majority of your final image will be in focus whereas, a low f number like F2.8 or lower makes the foreground stay in focus and the background will be blurred.
Hope this helps.....


thanks

Apr 09, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

Photos are blurred.


Blurred images are caused by several reasons: motion due to camera shake, use of slow shutter speeds and failure of the camera to focus correctly.

Slow shutter speeds

When light is low, wide apertures and slow shutter speeds will be selected automatically by the camera. Most people can't take blur-free, hand-held shots when the shutter speed is under 1/60th of a second.

Cameras that have optical Image Stabilization help but even IS has its limits. Increase room lighting, increase the ISO setting or use a tripod, or use a combination of all three.

Blurred images or misfocus

If an image is blurred due to camera shake, the blur will appear throughout the entire image. If parts of an image are in focus, and others are not, you've misfocused.

Sep 16, 2010 | Cameras

1 Answer

Pics out of focus


Sounds like "Camera Shake"

With Digital photography, any motion of the camera will tend to blur the photos. You'll see double edges in some photos, and plain fussy pictures in others.

The sharpest photos come from cameras sitting on stationary objects while the picture is taken.

Depending on how advanced your camera is, there are a couple of settings you can toy with.

One is the ISO setting which mimics the "Film Speed" exposure rating of camera film measured in as ISO100, ISO 200, ISO 300, ISO 400.
The Ratings are a balance between Fast action light capture, and slow higher resolution detail light capture.

ISO100 will make a cyclist passing by look like they're standing still.
ISO400 will make a cyclist passing by look like a blur passing by.

ISO100 will have larger dots of colors on the picture, (Low Resolution)
ISO400 will have tiny dots of colors on the picture, (High Resolution)

So, ISO setting is a matter of getting the best picture without the blur; get as close to ISO 100 as you can.

The other setting is Shutter Speed.

Some cameras will allow you to slow the shutter speed down to help get clearer pictures in dark environments, like places with high ceiling lights, or outside after sunset.

Again you want the fastest option available, here the balance is the same as the ISO, bright clear picture versus dark blurry picture, so you want the shortest shutter speed possible.
This is measured in fractions of a second, and often only the denominator (lower half) is mentioned, like this:
1/8 of a second is called 8 or (125 milisecond)
1/4 of a second is called 4 or (250 miliseconds)
1/2 of a second is called 2 or (500 miliseconds)
1 whole second is called 1 or (1 for one second)

On digital cameras it often simply mentioned as the fraction in a menu called shutter speed. The default is often the fastest capable speed.

Browse the menu options for ISO and Shutter speed to see what modifications you can make.

Remember it's about capturing the light, so bright sunny days are easy highest speed settings, but shady or indoor environments will take practice and fine tuning.
Also, make use of the timer delay option and set the camera on a stationary object to capture the clearest sharpest images.

Have Fun.






Jul 28, 2009 | Casio Cameras

1 Answer

Flash Setting Causes Delay


Without seeing the image, it's difficult to pinpoint the problem. But, going on the description you've described here, my guess would be that your shutter speed is too low to record any movement sharply, or is recording movement you are making while holding the camera. Some things that you may want to review with the camera to ensure that you're shooting the images correctly:

First, if you can look at the image using a photo editing program, see if you can review the EXIF (also called metadata) file and look at the exposure. Generally, anything under 1/30th of a second will show motion blur introduced from hand-holding the camera. If the shutter speed is below this, you should consider using a higher ISO setting or opening the apperture (this equates to a lower "F" number, so "F4" allows in LESS light than "F2.8") to allow more light into the lens. Remember that doubling the ISO will allow you to make an exposure with HALF the light. The down side to this is that higher ISO settings, particularly in Point and Shoot cameras, introduce higher levels of noise.

Ensure that you are no more than 10 feet from your subject. Most on-camera flash units are much less effective beyond this distance.

If you are photographing sports/action, remember that a shutter speed of 1/250th of a second will eliminate most motion blur.

Also remember that most point and shoot digital cameras are "one chip" cameras and often have multiple tasks to perform while making an image (focus, exposure, flash, recording and writing the file are all performed at the same time...), so it's not uncommon to see delays (also called "shutter lag") in point and shoot cameras (DSLR's have multiple chips, and don't have this issue...). One way to resolve this is to depress the shutter release half way. This keeps the chip "hot" and ready to expose. Doing this with a point and shoot camera greatly increases the responsiveness to the shutter release.

Hope this helps and happy shooting!

Jul 14, 2009 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-H9 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Blurred Images with Olympus E520


When operating any digital camera, the camera tries to capture the best focus and exposure for that particular scene. By pressing the shutter button half-way down, the focus and exposure is being set. There will be a green circle on the upper left hand corner of the screen, then your camera is ready to take the picture. Slowly depress the shutter the rest of the way down to take the picture.

Mar 23, 2009 | Olympus Zuiko 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Digital ED...

1 Answer

TROUBLESHOOTING c-750


There are a couple issues related to "slow" that I have with my C-750, and this is how I get around them.

One is the write speed to the xD card. This can prevent you from taking sequential pictures quickly, as the camera displays the current picture it is writing until it finishes. You can make the image of the current picture go away and use your viewfinder again, while the camera is writing the picture, by pressing the shutter button halfway and releasing it. Then you can see your subject in the viewfinder again!

Second is the delay between the time the shutter button is pressed and the time the shutter actually opens (when the camera actually takes the picture). This can be fixed by lining up your shot and pressing the shutter button halfway and holding it for a few seconds. This will give the camera time to adjust and lock focus, shutter speed, etc. There is a small green dot on the display below the battery indicator which will blink a few times when the button is pressed halfway, then remain on steady. When the green dot is steady, the camera is ready. Press the shutter button, and the camera should immediately take the picture.

Nov 12, 2007 | Olympus Camedia C-750 Ultra Zoom Digital...

3 Answers

Blurred images with no flash


First, try to get more light, particularly natural light (window); second, try using shutter priority (S mode), setting the shutter speed at not less than 1/50, faster if you are shooting motion/action (check the Properties of the blurred pictures that you've been getting in Camedia software - the shutter speeds are probably too slow because of the low light), and experiment with higher ISO settings (either 200 or Auto, not 400) though there's a trade-off in noise levels.

Sep 11, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-3020 Zoom Digital Camera

2 Answers

Having problems with the flash\ blurred and grainy images


You should not use the flash for these shots (unless you connect a powerful external flash), it won't help you at this distance. You should use the shutter priority mode and experiment with shutter speed (no flash) to get the best result - for sports action it should probably be faster than 1/100 sec. If the light is too low you may use higher ISO setting - 200 or 400 (though higher ISO will result in grainier images, it may be your only option for blur-free photos).

Sep 07, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-2100 Ultra Zoom Digital...

1 Answer

Miss all the action shots with this camera


The longest part of the shutter delay is caused by the autofocus mechanism. Most cameras will let you press the button half-way down and wait until the autofocus is locked. Then wait for the action to occur. When you press the button the remaining distance, there will be a shutter delay of about 0.2 seconds before the picture is taken. Using that technique will let you capture action shots. There is no way to improve shutter delay on any particular camera. The newer digital cameras are showing improvement in this area. Some are achieving autofocus lock in 0.4 seconds and shutter delay of an additional 0.1 seconds.

Sep 06, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-740 Ultra Zoom Digital...

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