Question about Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm Lens

2 Answers

My flash photo's are creating "white" eyes

I took pictures of my kids Christmas Musical last night from a bit of a distance. I used the 55-200 mm lens, and used it zoomed all the way. Most of the children have white, not red eyes in the photo's. This is not something I've ever had a problem with in other camera's. What am I doing wrong?

Posted by on

2 Answers

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Hot-Shot:

    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

    Corporal:

    An expert that has over 10 points.

    Problem Solver:

    An expert who has answered 5 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 20 Answers

I agree with jcdill but there is one other factor that may have caused the problem. The white eyes may be comming from the stage lighting. Sometimes you will see the same effect in direct sunlight pictures.
i sugest you take lots of practice pictures to get your settings right. I teach my students that the auto setting on their camera is like traing wheels on a bicycle. 

Posted on Dec 21, 2008

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Novelist:

    An expert who has written 50 answers of more than 400 characters.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 20 times.

  • Expert
  • 121 Answers

Without seeing the photos in question, I can't give you an exact answer. My best guess is that your flash was too far away to cause red-eye but was instead reflected from the moist surface of the eyeball as a white catch-light right in the center of the eyeball.

However, I can give you some tips on how to shoot photos in this situation.

First, flash and telephoto lenses do not work well together. The reason for this is that the light provided by your flash falls off dramatically as the distance increases. This is called the Inverse Square Law. What happens is that the light provided by your flash at 10 feet is 1/4 the light provided when the subject is at 5 feet - not 1/2 the light as you might first suspect. For this reason flash becomes essentially useless when your subject is more than 15-20 feet from the flash. Unless you can put strobe lighting on the stage and trigger it remotely from your camera (a very expensive process), you need to shoot with the available light.

First you need "fast glass" - this means a lens with a small f-stop number when zoomed to the maximum telephoto distance. These lenses are heavy, and expensive, but this is what you need to use to get this job done. Let me know if you want a link to some sites that rent these lenses. You need to shoot at the widest aperture (minimum f-stop number). I shoot with a 70-200 lens at f2.8 for this type of situation. Shoot in Aperture Priority mode so you can set the f-stop to the minimum for the lens (e.g. f2.8).

Second, you need to bump the ISO to the highest setting. This is why digital cameras have a high ISO setting, to enable you to shoot in low light. The images are going to have a lot of noise but there's no way around it - this is part of low light photography. Don't forget to reset the ISO after your are done - you don't want to shoot in high ISO all the time - just use it in low light situations.

Third, I usually under-expose by 1 stop so that I can use a shutter that is 1-stop faster than I could use otherwise - to minimize motion blur. This can be done in Aperture Priority mode by setting Exposure Compensation to -1. The shots will be a little dark but I find that it works OK because they "look" like they are on stage this way. You can also lighten them a bit in the post processing. If the light is really, really dim I may even shoot at -2.

Fourth, only shoot when your subject is in the brightest areas of the stage - don't try to get a shot when your subject is off on the side in dimmer light.

Fifth, shoot in RAW. You can do a lot in post-processing of RAW files to bring out details and minimize noise. If you shoot in JPEG there is little you can do to fix these problems in your post-processing.

Finally, you need to either use a lens with IS or VR that helps minimize blur from camera shake, or you need to use a tripod or monopod to help stabilize the camera.

Posted on Dec 17, 2008

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

EasyShare M853 Digital Camera: I am trying to upload pictures I took last night f...


Use a card reader instead of the camera and download to a folder you create on your desktop.

May 07, 2010 | Kodak EasyShare M853 Digital Camera

Tip

Get more out of S4000


ISO
Set ISO Setting to FIXED RANGE and set the range to 80-400. The camera produces noise at HIGH ISO setting.
NIGHT SHOTS
Get a small Tripod and you can take wonderful night time shots of city-scapes. Use a tripod and set the camera White Balance to Incandes. Make sure the FLASH is Off Set the Exposure Comp. to -2. Set the self timer and then frame and press the shutter and back away. Some exposures can be 1 second long so a tripod is not optional. Small plastic Joby ones work. If you are holding the camera during the shot it will move with you. A self timer is used to take the photo after you are not touching it.

When you use the flash set the White Balance to Flash (Unless you are outside on a sunny day. then use daylight)

I do NOT recommend using Auto Flash. Set the flash to OFF or turn it to SINGLE BOLT for fill.

When you want to photograph people outside in the sun set the White Balance to Daylight. On sunny days use the Fill Flash (Single Bolt) to fill faces better. Yes good photographers use flash in the direct sun. When cloudy are in shade turn flash off. If the subject has a bright background get close to them and have the flash on.

This camera makes red eye. In most cases when you are taking a photo of people in low light, when the flash supplies most of the light, you will get horrible red eye. You have to edit these later to remove the red eye.

on Mar 04, 2014 | Nikon Coolpix S4000 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Don't know how to take close-ups of objects.


Don't go too close to the object, since the lense works similar to the eye. EX if you put something mm. away from the eye it appears blurry and hard to see.
You need a certain distance and then use the zoom untill you have the desired image.
In SCN there is a special option for close up pics.

Pls. rate me good if any of these tricks have been useful for you.
Good luck

Nov 24, 2009 | Kodak EASYSHARE Z1485 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

TAKING NIGHT SUNSET PICTURES


this is becouse your not setting the "white balance"
up in the camera first,,,some digital cameras have a manual set up for "white balance" what the camera is doing is trying to put the color cast thats in a sun set right so it looks like day light,,,and you wont that color cast in the pitcher to give it that feeling,,,unless you over ride this white balance you will never get the color you are after,,, i use 35 mm film for sun sets
it will wip a digital camera every time here,,
but its horses for corses,good luck with your sun sets,,, but over ride that white balance first if you can

Nov 16, 2009 | Kodak EasyShare Z712 Digital Camera

1 Answer

DSC-H7 camera, getting red eye or white eye spots


First, here is why they are red or white spots:

The red is the reflection of your flash on the retinas of your subjects. The white are generally animal eyes reflecting back.

You will notice this on flash shots only and mostly when you use the zoom. The zoom uses a "narrow" field of view so the light that reflects back is "direct", instrad of at an angle.

The fix: Change the ISO setting (it is set too high). It is probably near the maximum sensitivity (3200?)... set it to 400 or so and try that for a while. 800 is probably the best general setting, but try 400 first.

Try not to use the flash unless you really have to, but only if the subject is less than 12 feet away. If no people are in the picture, you may use the flash for subjects greater than 12 feet.

this should work for you...

Sep 11, 2009 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-H7 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Z740 cannot focus on long-distance indoor shots


Have you tried changing the mode? ie portrait, closeup, macro etc?

Jun 19, 2009 | Kodak EasyShare Z740 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I get eyes that glow white in my pictures


bubba41, You didn't mention using the built-in pop-up flash that's when you get the "red-eye" and you can set the flash for redeye reduction when it's used.  If you are taking an indoor photo without the flash, if the redeye reduction is on turn it off that would eliminate the zombie or X-men eyes you are describing. randy320sgi

Jan 10, 2009 | Nikon D70s Digital Camera

1 Answer

I have a canon powershot 750


An ideea would be pressing the button a little bit harder and a little bit longer.Most of the cameras have that orange light before the flash(that appears when you press harder on the button) to reduce the red-eye effect in the pictures.
If this doesn't work, look carefully in the manual or the settings of your camera and try to find an option that turns on the flash.Also the type of the picture(indoor, sunny, night etc) can automatically disable the flash.
As a last resort, here is the camera's manual

Sep 02, 2008 | Canon PowerShot SD550 / IXUS 750 Digital...

2 Answers

Optio X visual defects


I've not seen any such defects on my Optio X, although I don't use flash much. The some-300 photos I've taken so far are completely clean. Sounds like dust on the CCD. Might warrant a return to Pentax.

Sep 08, 2005 | Pentax Optio X Digital Camera

2 Answers

Animal Eyes


I've seen some of those white eyes photos. Some are down right scary. I'm sure you have encountered red-eye when taking flash photos of people. With some animals, it is not red - but white. .... Try to catch the animal looking away from the camera when you take that flash picture. Have someone distract him/her. ............ Fixing Demonic Pet Eyes http://graphicssoft.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?zi=1/XJ&sdn=graphicssoft&zu=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.myjanee.com%2Ftuts%2Fpeteyes%2Fpeteyes.htm http://graphicssoft.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?zi=1/XJ&sdn=graphicssoft&zu=http%3A%2F%2Ftlbtlb.com%2Ftlbimages%2Fmax2.html

Aug 31, 2005 | Canon PowerShot SD400 / IXUS 50 Digital...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm Lens Logo

114 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Nikon Digital Cameras Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

96576 Answers

Steve

Level 3 Expert

3287 Answers

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17129 Answers

Are you a Nikon Digital Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...