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Possible toilet leak or doesn't stop running...

The plastic tube (bowl refill tube?) that sends water into the vertical standpipe (overflow tube?) keeps running and the floater (mounted in the corner of the tank) almost sounds like it is hissing. The metal tube that leads from the wall pipe to the bottom of the tank has a plastic screw fitting and turning it one way or the other and water leaks from the bottom of the tank. Also, the flush handle doesn't work either. The rod attached to it and the flapper via chain hangs all the way down to the bottom of the tank. Think that covers it. Appreciate your help. By the way, I am not very mechanically inclined but can understand and follow instructions pretty well.

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  • bench1023 Dec 18, 2008

    Richie, Thanks for chipping in with the advice. Went to the local hardware store and purchased a new valve and flapper as well as a new handle assembly. The whole thing took less than an hour and ...viola! Leak fixed! Much easier than I thought. I did such a good job that my wife is looking around the house for other things for me to fix! Gee, thanks!!

  • Beth Mitchell
    Beth Mitchell Apr 19, 2009

    My well pump died and had to be replaced. AS a result the water when turned on initially was very gritty. Now my toto toilet won't stop running when flushed. The manual syas that is caused by dirt in the fill valve seal and the fix is to open the fill valve cap and clean the fill valve seal. Unfortunatley, I don't see any part that comes off and could be the fill valve cap. What am I looking for?

    mitch21131@gmail.com

  • Anonymous Mar 20, 2014

    Absolutely NO WATER comes back into the tank after flushing. NONE. The float moves up and down the tubes; the seal is fine on the flapper; the skinny tube that moves water from the IN Tube into the fill tube is unobstructed... what if I dump vinegar and baking soda around the in-valve to remove any deposits?

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  • 44 Answers

This sounds like the ballvalve needs replacing & the hissing is the sound of water as the valve is not shutting off properly.
The valve at the bottom of the tank is possibly just a half turn valve so try that & see if it stops the water.
The water leaking could be thatthe water level is too high & leaking around the handle assembly & running down, so it kinda looks as though its leaking below?
The handle assembly may of come adrift so thats whay the handle may look loose ?

Solution sounds quite straight forward, a new ballvalve assembly needs to be fitted & the handle assembly sorting.
The leak will be rectified when you replace the old ballvalve, as you will need to turn off the water to the unit to remove the ballvalve, whilst the water is off a service valve should be fitted so as any future probs or servicing needs doing then it can be isolated without the need for turning the whole house off?

This work should be carried out by a registered plumber & is as i said a straight forward job.Price approx £65.00 subject to a survey by the plumber.

I hope this has helped

kindly

Richie

Posted on Dec 17, 2008

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Our toilet systern is constantly running it won't shut down


Faulty flush valve or leaky flapper

Nov 30, 2017 | Home

Tip

How to adjust a toilet


  • Your toilet tank may simply need a good "tune-up." Here are some adjustments you can make.

  • Refill valve. If your tank has a conventional ballcock refill valve, the water level is adjusted by bending the float arm. The level should be high enough for complete flushes, but the water should not be to the top of the overflow pipe. Your tank should have a colored or molded water level mark. It should never be set so low that the bowl does not refill with trap sealing water. The rule of thumb is to set the water level about 3/4" below the top of the overflow pipe.

  • If the float rubs on other parts, simply adjust the float arm sideways. If the float lacks buoyancy, unscrew then shake it to determine if it is waterlogged. A waterlogged float should be replaced. The float arm can also be replaced, if needed.

  • In tanks using modern plastic refill valves, the tank water level is adjusted in other ways. If your tank uses a hand nut, turn the nut clockwise to raise, or counterclockwise to lower, the water level. Or, your tank may have a sliding pinch clamp on an adjustment rod.

  • Flush valve. Replacements for a flush ball and its actuating mechanism are available, but it may be possible to stop a leak with minor adjustments. Check the following mechanisms before purchasing replacements.

  • See that the guide arm is centered directly over the seat. The guide arm should drop the flush ball directly into its seat. If the flush ball is not seating properly, make the adjustment shown.

  • The guide arm should allow the flush ball to rise enough for a complete flush. If not, raise the arm. Be careful that it isn't too high–then it will prevent the ball from closing completely.

  • Check that the upper lift wire pulls the flush ball high enough. To adjust it, simply bend the wire for a higher or lower lift.

  • The lifting hardware on a flapper-type flush valve should raise the rubber flapper to start a flush, but should not hold the flapper up off its seat. If this is occurring, the hardware is adjusted too short. Some types allow you to slide the flapper itself up or down on the refill tube to ensure that the flapper meets the valve seat squarely. The lifting hardware and flapper height adjustments are the first things to check when flapper problems arise.

  • Refill tube. If the bowl-refill tube is out of place, water is routed directly into the tank, rather than replenishing water in the bowl. When this is the case, you will likely hear splashing sounds during tank refill. The refill tube should aim directly into the overflow pipe but should not reach below water level. If the tube extends too low, it will siphon tank water silently away. Fix it by repositioning as shown.

  • Defective refill tubes on some valves can be replaced with new plastic ones. Simply place one end of the plastic tube over the serrated plastic lug on the body of the valve, and place the plastic holder in the top of the overflow pipe.
  • on Jan 16, 2010 | Plumbing

    1 Answer

    Water keeps filling in toliet even after full


    hi Patricia.
    Overview Toilets haven't changed much in the last 80 years. After a flush, water still fills a tank, lifting a float that shuts off the water when it reaches a certain level. A lever still opens a flapper to cause the flush, falling back into place when the water level drops. So it's no surprise (nor any consolation) that we face the same flush problems today that our grandparents did. Sometimes the flush is too wimpy, sometimes the toilet keeps running, and sometimes the bowl doesn't refill.
    Our ace plumbing consultant has a simple four-step strategy to solve 95 percent of these problems. You can complete the first three steps in five minutes. That'll solve most problems. The fourth step is usually easy too, but not always. More on this later. These steps work for most toilets but not for pressure-assist models.
    Check the fill tube

    Overflow tube problem

    Push the fill tube firmly onto the fill valve. Make sure the fill tube sends water into the overflow tube.Remove the tank lid and find the fill tube. It's a small flexible tube that runs from the fill valve to the overflow tube. While the tank refills, this tube squirts enough water down the overflow tube to refill the bowl after the completed flush. If this tube falls off or the water stream misses the overflow tube, the bowl won't fill and your next flush will be wimpy (that is, won't develop a strong siphon). Reattach the fill tube and make sure it perches about 1 in. above the rim of the overflow tube. Flush the toilet and watch the water stream to make sure it goes down the overflow tube.
    Adjust the fill height

    Check the float

    Adjust the float to set the water level. Pinch the clip and slide the float up or down on the rod. Keep adjusting the float until the water shuts off at the proper level.The water level in the tank is controlled by an adjustable float. A float that's set too low produces a weak flush; if it's set too high, water spills into the overflow tube and the fill valve won't shut off. The toilet keeps running. Look for the fill level mark on the inside back of the tank and mark it on the overflow tube so you can see it more easily. If you can't find it, measure down about 1 in. on the overflow tube and make a mark. Then flush the toilet and see if the water reaches and stops at that mark. If not and the toilet keeps running, adjust the float up or down. If you have an old toilet, you'll have to bend the brass rod that connects to the float ball to make adjustments. But with newer toilets you usually turn a screw or slide a clip along a rod. Flush the toilet after each adjustment.
    Also make sure that the water level is at least an inch below the C-L (critical level) marked on the fill valve. You can adjust the height of many valves to raise or lower the C-L.
    Occasionally the fill valve simply won't shut off, which means that it's defective. If so, turn the water supply off at the shutoff under the tank. Buy a replacement valve (sold at hardware stores and home centers). You don't have to match the old one; many, like the one shown, fit most toilets. It's a 15-minute change-out.
    Adjust the flush handle/flapper chain

    Flapper chain fix

    Adjust the chain to leave a little slack with the flapper closed. Then cut off the excess, leaving about an inch.A chain that's too short or tangled won't allow the flapper to close and water will continue to leak into the bowl. This causes the fill valve to cycle on and off to refill the tank. A chain that's too long, or a flush rod that hits the the tank lid, won't open the flapper wide enough to stay open for the full flush. You'll find yourself having to hold the lever to complete a good flush.
    To avoid these problems, adjust the linkage in the chain to leave only a slight bit of slack when closed. Cut the chain at the rod to leave only about an inch extra to reduce the potential for tangles. Then put the tank lid back on and make sure the flush rod doesn't strike the lid when you press the lever. If it does, bend it down slightly and readjust the chain.
    Replace the flapper

    Change the flapper

    Unsnap the old flapper and take it with you to the store to find an exact replacement. In addition to the closest replacement, pick up a "universal" type.If you've completed the first three steps and your toilet keeps running, chances are you have a worn-out flapper. Turn off the water, remove the old flapper and take it to the store to find an exact replacement. (Hardware stores often carry a wide variety.) Most flappers snap over ears on the overflow tube. Others have a ring that slips over the tube.
    Now here's the catch. You may not find an exact match. The range of flapper styles has mushroomed over the last 15 years, and you may find 15 to 20 flapper options on the store shelf. Some packages include specific brand and model information (so note yours before you leave home). Others have a "universal" label. If you can't find an exact replacement, try the closest one and pick up a universal type as well. They're cheap, and the extra one just might save you a second trip to the store! (Avoid the "adjustable" types unless you're replacing an adjustable one.)
    Install the new flapper and make sure it opens and closes freely. Then test it. If the toilet keeps running or runs intermittently, you're not getting a good seal. Try a different flapper if the toilet won't stop running.
    If you just can't find a flapper that seals, consider replacing the entire overflow tube/flapper. On most toilets (two-piece), this means removing the tank. It's not difficult and you don't need special tools. It'll take you about an hour, and you'll avoid that expensive plumber service call.
    if you go to this link it will show you step by step on how to fix it. How to Stop Running Toilet Family Handyman

    Nov 27, 2017 | Home

    1 Answer

    When toilet is flushed and refills water leaks into the cistern.


    Are you saying that water is running into the toilet bowl? If so, check the rubber flapper at the bottom, and the valve (tube standing up).

    Mar 29, 2016 | Caroma Home

    1 Answer

    Loosing water from insulated crane toilet tank


    The fill tube may have a crack in it. I am referring to the plastic tube where the water runs in from a small rubber tube connected to the fill valve to refill the bowl after you flush it also serves as an overflow tube in case the water level gets too high. a crack will allow water from the tank to run into the bowl bypassing the flapper. checks this and replace if necessary. hope this helps.
    Bob

    Jul 24, 2014 | Crane Plumbing Home

    1 Answer

    The water in the tank continues to leak out and the tank has to continue to refill. I have replaced the flapper, I have taken the tank off the toilet and check gasket alignment. The tank does not leak...


    There are only a coulple of places that the toilet could leak or, overflow and give you this problem. When you replaced the flapper valve, did it have an extra piece of rugger on it? Universal flappers have a round piece on them that are designed to fit over the overflow tube. If you flapper had this piece and you don't have need for it, you need to cut that out, if the flapper "hooks" to the overflow assembly. Leaving that piec on can contort the shape of the flapper and make it so it won't seal. If you are noticing constant movement(slight swirl) in the bowl, make sure the back tank is not constantly overflowing into overflow tube. If this is the case, your water level is too high. You will either need to adjust the water level and/or replace the fill valve. If you can hear the toilet running or leaking, push down on the flapper, if it stops, you have a problem with the flapper and/or the chain adjustment. When you install the flapper, you have ton make sure the chain is long enough to let the flapper fall and seal but, not so long that it can tangle or get between the the flapper and it's seal below it.

    Jun 19, 2011 | Jacuzzi Home

    1 Answer

    Replaced the seals because it was running. Water is still leaking from the tank somewhere so it keeps refilling....it's constantly leaking and refilling. how can I repair this.


    You say you have replaced seals. I assume that you are refering to the flaper valve that controls dumping water from tank to bowl to flush. To make sure you have a good seal put a dozen or so drops of food coloring directly into tank when it's full and observe for a hour or so to see if water in bowl is discoloring. If it is then you are still leaking there. You can shut off water supply off or flush toilet and manually hold flush valve closed. Check to see if there are any rough spots on flapper seal that could stop flapper from sealing good. If you find rough spot then make sure the surface is dry and sand lightly with medium grit sandpaper.120 grit or finer.
    One other thing to check is if your toilet has the plastic or rubber tube that goes from the flush valve into the overflow. Make sure that this tube does not set below water level in tank when it is full as this can create a suction or syphon,
    Hope this helps you. Thanks

    Jan 10, 2011 | American Standard Home

    1 Answer

    The refill water in the toilet bowl is low ever since installation. How can I add more water?


    Most toilets use less bowl water. But to check yours, be sure that the little plastic refill hose goes down the overflow tube.

    Sep 14, 2010 | Eljer & Titan Elongated Toilet Bowl

    1 Answer

    The water will not refill! The inner plastic part doesn't work and it's only one year old! I must pour a bucket of water into the bowl to flush waste.


    Does this tank have the plastic bucket around the flapper inside the tank. If so this is a water saver toilet. A few tricks to increase the water. I have had to remove the bucket by cutting it maybe half into to increase the gpm.
    This will increase it to more than 1.6 gpm's. It can be cut down just be careful in doing it if this is the problem.

    Next make surethe fill valve has line running and attached to overflow tube. This will fill the bowl with the needed water for it and the tank.
    Next make sure the water is set to the mark either on the tank or the overflow tube. If no mark to within 5/8" to top of overflow tube .

    Jun 27, 2010 | Jacuzzi Bath Perfecta EZ33 959 White round...

    1 Answer

    When I flush the toilet not enough water comes back into the bowl


    There should be a small plastic tube (about 1/4 inch in diameter) running from the fill valve (at the left side of the tank) to the overflow tube (about 1 inch in diamter) located near the centr of the tank. The small plastic tube is supposed to have water flowing when the tank is refilling. This is the water than helps refill the bowl. The little plastic tube some times gets knocked off from its position at the top of the overfill tube.

    Jun 11, 2009 | American Standard Home

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